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First time training a retriever puppy and she's now 5 months old. CC on sit is going well, teething so hold isn't being forced, pretty 'steady' using Bill Hillmanns training program so traffic cop is going very well, she still breaks sometimes but she's still young. Heel is going well.

What have you found to be the best method to train HERE (check cord/ecollar). I've done what Hillmann has with the HERE command and she listens very well in the house and backyard. However she has started to very discreatly ignore me. I have to call her 2 or three times before she decides to come around. Very good on the whistle (3 blasts).

However I can't whistle naturally and if I forget it I'm afraid she'll ignore her recall when she needs to come back. She has become more independent and runs farther from me, I need her to be closer in range so tips for this would help a lot too.

I want to get working on this quickly before she decides it's ok to come back only when she decides. Thanks!
 

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Sometimes you have to do an early ecollar here session. My experience has been about 50/50. I had to do an early here session with Rowdy. Lardy doesn't include in his DVD but acknowledges the need sometimes.

Ill look up at what age I did this with Rowdy. It only took three sessions and it was done.

Rowdy was six months and wore the ecollar for three weeks while turned off for three weeks prior.
 

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I like a light line I can step on and drag them back. I prefer a physical approach with HERE, simply because a dog does not wear a e-collar all the time, and here needs to be a command that is obeyed all the time. With a proper light-line they don't know they're dragging it, learn pretty quick that they can't get away, and that they better pay attention. For a young pup get two people in the yard, throw the light-line back and forth inbtw both of you, taking turns on who's calling. ~30min and the pup will know to come to both of you, then start letting the pup drag the line around, and testing recall with yard distractions. No light-line? Dogs always wear their ears, however you better be able to catch them to enforce the command ;).
 

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This is one of the times I use treats. I keep kibble in my pocket. Start by working the pup in a fenced area. Let the pup bounce around and do her thing. When she comes to you to check in, praise and a piece of kibble. When you reel her in on the long line, praise and give kibble. Then start putting in the "here" when she is loose in the fenced area and reward with kibble.

Amazing what a little kibble can do.

Meredith
 

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The problem with "here" is two fold... it doesn't always generate a positive result for the dog. They get pressure for something else (like heel) at your side, or they are called into the house when they'd rather be outside... They have to give up whatever they have and not get it back... blah blah blah you get what I mean often the result is inconsistent for the dog. Second problem is timing of reinforcement. If you call your dog from 10 feet away and reward them when they arrive the reinforcement, many times is not close enough timing wise to the command to make reinforcement possible.

I do several things do address this. First, I start with a pup and just say "here", let them move 1 foot and get a treat from my hand. I do this over and over and over again. The treat has to happen within 1 second of the command in order to reinforce it. Then I move to two or three person "doggie in the middle" drills with the added twist that when the dog arrives at whomever called it they repeat the "here" command just as they feed the dog. They say "here" to prompt the dog and then "here" just as they feed it in order to insure that "here" = food.

I generally keep this scheme up using Bart Bellon's "ne po po" procedure once pressure is added. In that case we add pressure to the prompt, like "here, nick, here" but I also make sure to reward the dog with a "here" - "reward" sequence when they arrive.

My clients report and demonstrate very solid results when pairing "here" directly to the reward and being careful about timing, as well as making sure there is ALWAYS a reward when the dog recalls properly.

I often put clients on variable reward schedules for all their other commands and maintain 100% reward schedule for "here" several weeks into their lessons.

It's too important not to put the time into it.
 

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A rope goes a long way on alot of things....always have control of the dog...here and reel em in....give a treat when young and less when they get a little older.....collar condition on here when they're ready not because the DVD says to.....Randy
 

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"solid results when pairing "here" directly to the reward and being careful about timing, as well as making sure there is ALWAYS a reward when the dog recalls properly"

"maintain 100% reward schedule for "here" several weeks into their lessons"

It's too important not to put the time into it.

Thanks Darrin.

I would add, much of what determines a pup's initial responses to "here" is based on how "other things" in training have progressed. An upbeat, happy and willing pup "nurtured" to focus with fair presentations is much more likely to respond favorably to new expectations. It is often obvious when a pup likes you and wants to be with you because "here" becomes just another lesson.

Contrast this with a "story" from another forum from several years ago. I still chuckle when recalling it. A relatively new forum member had a very talented pup....doing all kinds of retrieving skills beyond his age. The training process used was rather unorthodox (to be kind), but the pup was progressing rapidly.

One Monday a post appeared expressing great anguish over his pup's continual, taunting, keep away. He was "not happy" and said an e-collar order was placed that morning using a speedy delivery option.

Thursday's post was (and I don't remember the pup's name)....."The collar worked like a charm. Charlie was coming to me like a bat out of hell." The pup proceeded to train well and earned a rather rapid HRCH title.

Which reminds me of another dog training technique...."Do you feel lucky?"
 

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When I start "here" with a puppy, I don't give it a verbal cue right away. I don't say anything. It's pretty easy to get a puppy to run to you, and when they are in the act of doing that, I will say "here"...I don't say it before they are starting to come to me. And reward when they get to me, always. I find with a lot of things it's easier to get the dog to physically do something first, then give it a name/use a verbal cue after the dog is doing it/is in the act of doing it.
And a light rope is always good for when they hit the teenager stage and figure out that there are options other than complying, but I find I need less of that by doing what I described above.
 

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What have you found to be the best method to train HERE
I want to get working on this quickly before she decides it's ok to come back only when she decides. Thanks!
I start earlier than some ?
My approach has been conditioning rather than teaching when it comes to pups ,but every one that has left here and every one that is still here has total recall.
This may not help you in your current situation?..But the question was ''What have you found to be the best method to train HERE '' :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vbZz_iHEug
 
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