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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to the world of labs (as a kid I had a beagle and Irish setter) but it seems like Halle's not handling the heat all to well. The past couple days of high 70s and low 80s is putting a hurting on her. I can only imagine how the heat of summer will affect her. What do you guys do to keep your dogs cool in the heat? I'm giving lots of water and trying to limit heavy physical exertion, but it's only March...
 

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I am one who has one that will go until he drops like most, he has done it twice. Like ourselves, you have to gradually work your dog up to tolerating the heat and/or humidity. What I do is limit the retriever training or upland training times, give lots of water, and fans, I have 4 in my truck, if it does get bad, then in the cab he goes for some AC. I also try to do my work outs early in the morning while it is still cool if my schedule allows it. Al this now applies to my 10 month old pup who is also Black.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice. I get to take her to work with me and I normally air her out every few hours, but this week has been noticeably harder on her. We just went for our evening run (little over a mile) and she's DONE! I gave her ice and it seemed to help. I guess we'll transition to morning runs and do longer sessions earlier in the day (vs a few during the day).
 

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Even though I have yellows, they are conditioned physically which helps them tolerate the heat. I gradually increase their run times and water them while they exercise. I do all this once the sun starts to fade.
If your going to be running HT they have to be able to handle the heat.
Little word to the wise if you do water work, don't put a hot wet dog in the dog box tie him out in the shade till he cools off.
 

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I follow the 85 degree rule about training. I stop any rigorous training when it reaches 85. I will do some ob in the shade when it is hotter. I'm not a jogger but I'll bet that 85 would be a good stopping point for jogging also.
 

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I agree with Wayne about the 85*. When we lived in SC our days training was DONE by 8:30. It also helps to keep the dogs out of the AC if you have a shady sheltered spot for them. Ours had kennels in a daylight basement that generally ran about 10* cooler than the outside temp. It really helped them acclimate to the heat and they did much better than when they stayed in the house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess she'll get used to the heat. It just seems the switch from 60 degree to 70 degree weather has hit her (at least enough that I've taken note). Early morning jogs and sessions will be the trick during summer. I figured a black dog during the heat of summer would be rough but I had no idea; her coat's hot to the touch at 70 degrees...
 

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Wayne is there a humidity cutoff with that 85 degree cutoff? I've trained Alaskan dogs out in the desert of CA both at Niland and Lost Hills (Bakersfield area) True, they had had a couple of months to acclimate but in Niland especially, they did well when the temps got to right around 100. We put water in every setup and the dogs were in the shade. The water was cool and the humidity was very low.

Little later edit. I almost had one almost collapse on me in right at 70 degrees and muggy here in Alaska. Big triple with a big hunt and he was done in. I wasn't as observant as I am now and that could have been bad.
 

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Howard, There is always humidity in the south, some days worse than others. So, I guess in the western arid states where the humidity is much lower then the 85 degree rule would not be as valid.
 

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I don't believe in this 85 degree limit. I guarantee you the humidity in WM is wayyyy higher than north TX ever thought about. If I can train my EIC affected dog in higher temps with high humidity, then I don't see why you have to abide by some mythical 85 degree limit. Obviously you have to stay on top of things, but I'd get 0 training done for half the year or more if I went alone with that rationale.
 

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In Pa. I train when I can. If it's hot on the weekend you can't wait for Monday or Tuesday to train. If the trial is on a hot weekend they still have it.

If you train a couple dogs you can start and quit early but if you go with a group for the day you can't. You run your dog and by the time it's his turn to run again it's a couple hours later.

It's not Texas or Louisiana I know it's much hotter there. I've trained on some of the hottest days we've had. 92 degrees or so. In tall cover like a hayfield the humidity can be terrible for the dogs.

You have to watch but, you run a dog on a triple and put him back in the "cooler" truck or the shade under the truck. Most places have some shade somewhere to park under. You have to be quicker to help if they go wrong finding the mark. If they mess up one of the marks you don't repeat it.

Some dogs are OK in the heat some have a hard time with it. You can run through the water on the way to a mark or blind. I know sometimes the water is as warm as the air too, but usually the water is cooler.
 

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I don't believe in this 85 degree limit. I guarantee you the humidity in WM is wayyyy higher than north TX ever thought about. If I can train my EIC affected dog in higher temps with high humidity, then I don't see why you have to abide by some mythical 85 degree limit. Obviously you have to stay on top of things, but I'd get 0 training done for half the year or more if I went alone with that rationale.
:eek:
Doesn't the dog have to collaps when exercised to "really" be EIC affected ?

john
 

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The thermoregulatory setpoint in the brain takes time to adjust to rapid increases in the air temp. It is not unusual for animals to appear heat stressed at the end of winter, when lows are still cool but the daytime temp jumps to the 70's and 80's.
 

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It affects individual dogs differently, just like it does people. You do have to acclimate them to the heat. Here in New England, we had temps in the 80's for 3 days last week. My dogs could not tolerate it as it had been in the 30's-40's just the week before. By summer, 80's won't bother them a bit.

Humidity is actually much more of a problem than heat as dog's shed heat by panting. When it is humid the air they are exchanging when panting does not help to regulate their temperature at all. That is why you can have dogs collapsing with high humidity and 70 degree temps. Also when it is very humid, a wet dog actually gets hotter than a dry one (think sauna) unless you have a fan running on them.

Back to the 40's this week. It was nice, but rather odd to be doing channel blinds in March here.

Dawn
 

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Just be sensible when it is hot. I train on a regular basis when it is over 90 and pushing 100. The dogs work in it just fine as long as they are in shape leading up to the summer. Year round work is the key IMO. Don't be scared of the heat, but pay very close attention to the dog and stop when you feel like you need to. Over the course of the summer you will be amazed at what temps they can do good work in. If I went but some crazy temp cutoff rule I would have dogs rotting from April until October. I can't believe people stop because of a number.
 
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