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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, so I'm curious as to how many of you have experience with running british labs in field trials or hunt tests? do you like them better or about the same? I realize this is a ford vs chevy kind of discussion and I'm not looking to stir any pots just want some good opinions and direction, i have had 3 american labs and very excited about just putting a deposit on my first british lab.

Thanks in advance!
 

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So to be upfront, I have a "British" Lab. Born in America, not from a "British" breeder, but he fit the bill for what we wanted at the time. We weren't looking for a British Lab, but everything else seemed to fit in place. Personally, I think so much of it is going to be on you. Historically, British Labs have not done well in American Field Trials. But, on the HRC/AKC Hunt Test side of the house, they are a ton that have reached MH and/or HRCH status. For me, when I get my next Lab, it won't be a British vs. American debate, but rather, does the breeder/parents/lineage cater to what I am looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So to be upfront, I have a "British" Lab. Born in America, not from a "British" breeder, but he fit the bill for what we wanted at the time. We weren't looking for a British Lab, but everything else seemed to fit in place. Personally, I think so much of it is going to be on you. Historically, British Labs have not done well in American Field Trials. But, on the HRC/AKC Hunt Test side of the house, they are a ton that have reached MH and/or HRCH status. For me, when I get my next Lab, it won't be a British vs. American debate, but rather, does the breeder/parents/lineage cater to what I am looking for.
I can definitely understand the personal fit standard. I guess I'm not so much looking to go crazy with FT or HT, rather asking to see what can be accomplished with them. But glad to know yours is working out for you!
 

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I have to get some clarity. The term "British Lab" is often used synonymously with show-style lab. Broad head, thick coat, otter-like tail, shorter legs, squarer build. I think there was a British import who was a very productive stud sometime back in the 80's or 90's and he racked up a lot of Show pointage and threw those traits to his off-spring and pretty soon... everyone was breeding a "British Style Lab" when what they meant was they were breeding Labs for the show ring.

(Someone here might be able to nail the history down better than I can.)

If this is how you are using the term "British Lab" then... yeah, you might have a problem. Some of these dogs hunt and can do the work at HT's. (Forget about FT's.) A lot of these dogs are hard to watch at hunt tests. (Not all... some.) They don't really appear to want to be out there.

The other usage of the term "British lab" is to refer to a dog that is loaded in the near pedigree, if not sire and dam, with lots of British Field Champions. If that's how you are using the term, you'll be getting a dog that very likely can do the work. And they look pretty much like our field labs.
 

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I thought the RTF experts had decided it was the "English" Labs that were show type. And "British" Labs now had to be whelped in Great Britain to meet one of our resident Brits' rigorous standard. It's all so very confusing.
 

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Well... you might be right. I just want to know how the OP is using the term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have to get some clarity. The term "British Lab" is often used synonymously with show-style lab. Broad head, thick coat, otter-like tail, shorter legs, squarer build. I think there was a British import who was a very productive stud sometime back in the 80's or 90's and he racked up a lot of Show pointage and threw those traits to his off-spring and pretty soon... everyone was breeding a "British Style Lab" when what they meant was they were breeding Labs for the show ring.

(Someone here might be able to nail the history down better than I can.)

If this is how you are using the term "British Lab" then... yeah, you might have a problem. Some of these dogs hunt and can do the work at HT's. (Forget about FT's.) A lot of these dogs are hard to watch at hunt tests. (Not all... some.) They don't really appear to want to be out there.

The other usage of the term "British lab" is to refer to a dog that is loaded in the near pedigree, if not sire and dam, with lots of British Field Champions. If that's how you are using the term, you'll be getting a dog that very likely can do the work. And they look pretty much like our field labs.
For the purposes of this thread, when I say british, I mean british/irish hunting lines...I have always thought that the show dogs were "English" not British, but a quick look at a pedigree can differentiate. But I am very much talking about British Field Champion dogs!!
 

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Good deal. I visited with a pro in Ireland. His dogs had lots of drive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have only seen one of the British Field Trial dogs in person, this had so much drive but so much composure it was unreal, very impressive.
 

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A bunch do well in HTs, can't say I've seen overly many in FT, but then again; who knows by the time you get to the advanced titles, and obtain the degree of insanity necessary to keep on running FT. Most usually give up stating "my dog is British, or this or that"; and focus more on my dog is going to the 2nd 3rd 4th series. Most owners of a AFC or FC; really don't care their dogs background, color, etc. They care that their dog is an AFC-FC, because blue looks good on all dogs; regardless ;).
 
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