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Is there any research center or school of veterinary medicine that is looking in to this?

I am aware that use of CBN is a growing trend in treating some of the worst seizure syndromes in children. A very well trained pediatric neurologist in our town is using it. It's showing some seriously good results.

Since legalization of medical marijuana, there are people cultivating strains of the plant that are very high-yield CBN and low THC. And I think this is a very hopeful trend.

Is anyone studying it in dogs?
 

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I used CBD oil for a seven-year-old corgi with seizures. It was the top ranked CBD oils and seem to be a reasonably good brand. It was 350 mg and the dosage was seven drops per day. He's been on it for about six months now and has not had another seizure
 

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Dr. McGrath at Colorado State is studying the effects of CBD oil on canine epilepsy. This was started 2-3 ? years ago. You can probably google it. She did have a presentation at one of the AKC Health seminars about what types of CBD oil to buy but I know there are no results for her epilepsy research yet.
 

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What about stress in dogs? Is it treated with cbd products or not? I've seen chicken sticks and CBD oil on sale. What will be better in terms of efficiency? My dog is very afraid of going to the vet and I would like to calm him down every time before visiting the clinic.
 

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I have a dog that developed early onset low thyroid which includes anxiety and aggression as symptoms. After getting his thyroid medication regulated, he still had “break through” aggression episodes which made living with him scary and unnerving. The thyroid doc recommended adding cannibus to his treatment. We now have a dog we—and our other dogs—can live with. Still have to keep an eye on him during episodes of extra stimulation, like company, change in routine, etc. But it kept us from putting him down.

We use the capsules from Canna-Pet. They also have biscuits if you just need it occasionally rather than daily.

Meredith
 

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I have a dog that developed early onset low thyroid which includes anxiety and aggression as symptoms. After getting his thyroid medication regulated, he still had “break through” aggression episodes which made living with him scary and unnerving. The thyroid doc recommended adding cannibus to his treatment. We now have a dog we—and our other dogs—can live with. Still have to keep an eye on him during episodes of extra stimulation, like company, change in routine, etc. But it kept us from putting him down.

We use the capsules from Canna-Pet. They also have biscuits if you just need it occasionally rather than daily.

Meredith
Thank you Meredith! My dog is also sometimes aggressive, but I think this is due to a disease of his joints. We often go to the doctor for a check-up, but I don't want to do my dog an operation, it can be a big problem when recovering. I should probably consult a doctor about choosing a cannabis product.
 

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Have you checked the dog for hypothyroidism? Has the dog gained any weight? Is he laying around a lot. Hypothyroidism can cause seizures, bacterial infections, exercise intolerance, coat problems, etc.
 

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Have you checked the dog for hypothyroidism? Has the dog gained any weight? Is he laying around a lot. Hypothyroidism can cause seizures, bacterial infections, exercise intolerance, coat problems, etc.
Our veterinarian diagnosed dysplasia. There are no other problems.
 

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The AKC has an ongoing study on CBD and seizures. You can read the information on their website. No conclusions yet. My dog has Hypothyroidism we cured that with thyroid tabs. He has had light seizures once a month that I believe are caused by the thyroid problem. His blood test levels with the thyroid tabs are perfect. But I did research that some dogs with perfect readings need to be in the higher range of the normal readings to get rid of the last remaining symptoms. I've been researching CBD oil and you have to get it from a very good source. It's not cheap. My dog just recently started to have more of these light seizures. She ordered another round of blood test and a urinalysis. I went to a locally owned health food pet store where they are very knowledgeable about CBD oil and pet food. They sell Pet-Relief which owns their own farm and processing plant in Colorado. They are one of the first businesses to do CBD. Processing the hemp and all organic is critical. The Canna company looks good also. AKC has a recommended source as well. I just gave my dog his first dose yesterday afternoon. I will give him 2 half doses 12 hours apart with his thyroid medicine. My vet has been very helpful. She has consulted with brain vet and a specialist on seizures. The other research I read is to put the dog on a high fat / protein, low carb dog food. There are actual studies by dog food companies and universities on this helping 50% of the dogs. There are a number of different seizure disorders in dogs which makes it difficult in some cases for the vet and owners to determine the best treatment options. Researching dog food is just as complicated. I'll let you know what happens with my dog. He is on the Pet-Relief Hemp Oil 500mg. I will probably will buy some capsules for when he is kenneled. I train him in the water with a camo swim vest from Cabelas for longer retrieves. He's at the Senior hunt test level and no vest are allowed. By the way, 60 minutes did two shows on CBD and a young NE Ohio girl with severe multiple seizures 5 or 6 years ago. Colorado was the only state selling medical grade CBD oil. The parents researched it and took their daughter to Colorado and put her on CBD oil and she rarely has a seizure. They picked up and moved. The follow up show reconfirmed the results. There is a lot more human studies on CBD oil that works. Human and dog biology are similar in some respects i.e. we use a lot of the same drugs.
 

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Studies are ongoing. We don't have a good dose for dogs, nor a verified source of consistent product yet.

There was some evidence for the low carb diet with high medium chain triglycerides, but another study was more inconclusive. There is actually a prescription diet formulated. (Purina Neurocare)


The following is quoted from a veterinary neurologist.

"Regarding cannabidiol, have you see the study by McGrath's group at CSU? (2019)

Briefly, they looked at 26 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy poorly controlled with antiseizure drugs and randomized them to get either CBD oil or placebo in addition to their current medication. There was no clinically significant improvement in seizure control although there was a slight but statistically significant decrease in the number of seizures. Unfortunately, the authors did not mention anything about the statistical power of the study. I suspect it may have been underpowered so a larger study might detect more of a difference.

I've had a number of clients try CBD oil in their pet with epilepsy. Some think it helps, most don't.

Another issue is that unless you use the FDA-approved drug Epidiolex, you are using an unregulated formulation so there's limited assurance as to what's actually in the produce. "

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Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy.
Language: English
J Am Vet Med Assoc. June 2019;254(11):1301-1308.
DOI: 10.2460/javma.254.11.1301
Stephanie McGrath, Lisa R Bartner, Sangeeta Rao, Rebecca A Packer, Daniel L Gustafson


Article Abstract OBJECTIVE:To assess the effect of oral cannabidiol (CBD) administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.
DESIGN:Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial.
ANIMALS:26 client-owned dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy.
PROCEDURES:Dogs were randomly assigned to a CBD (n = 12) or placebo (14) group. The CBD group received CBD-infused oil (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb], PO) twice daily for 12 weeks in addition to existing antiepileptic treatments, and the placebo group received noninfused oil under the same conditions. Seizure activity, adverse effects, and plasma CBD concentrations were compared between groups.
RESULTS:2 dogs in the CBD group developed ataxia and were withdrawn from the study. After other exclusions, 9 dogs in the CBD group and 7 in the placebo group were included in the analysis. Dogs in the CBD group had a significant (median change, 33%) reduction in seizure frequency, compared with the placebo group. However, the proportion of dogs considered responders to treatment (≥ 50% decrease in seizure activity) was similar between groups. Plasma CBD concentrations were correlated with reduction in seizure frequency. Dogs in the CBD group had a significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. No adverse behavioral effects were reported by owners.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:Although a significant reduction in seizure frequency was achieved for dogs in the CBD group, the proportion of responders was similar between groups. Given the correlation between plasma CBD concentration and seizure frequency, additional research is warranted to determine whether a higher dosage of CBD would be effective in reducing seizure activity by ≥ 50%.
 

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A very informative article about the effects of cannabidiol on dogs, but as noted above, it turns out that many people already use CBD to treat their dogs. To be honest, I myself am very much looking forward to the results and will probably soon be using hemp CBD as well.
 
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