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The vitreous is part of the back in the inner eye (behind the colored iris that we see) that is composed of a gel like material that is between the iris and the retina (visual struture) in the back of the eye.



There are different types of vitreous degeneration, and syneresis is a type of degeneration. It occurs when the the vitreous changes from its normal gel like consistency to a more liquid consistency. This change predisposes to detachments of the retina, which can lead to blindness. It is often seen in young Shih Tzus, greyhounds, italian greyhounds, and whippets, as well as a few other breeds, and can be seen in any breed. The fact that it is seen in some breeds more commonly would support a heritable nature of this disease, however, the genetics of the disease are not completely understood.



This is a relatively uncommon disease, though I do not know exact statistics on the percentage of dogs affected. If your dog was recently diagnosed with this disease, i would strongly recommend talking with a veterinary ophthalmologist as soon as possible if you haven't already, since there are potential surgical options (retinopexy -- attaching the retina to the back part of the eye, usually with a laser) to help prevent vision loss in dogs diagnoses with syneresis.

Was this diagnoised on your dog or were you just reading the codes on the cerf certificate and wondering what it meant?
 

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Breeder option means exactly that- while CERF does not nor cannot control what a breeder does with his/her dogs, they can make suggestions and they have a list of conditions that may warrant a second glance so to speak when breeding. The conditions that merit the option varies from breed to breed because some conditions are prevalent in some breeds which leads to the conclusion that they may be genetically inherited (but no DNA test is available to prove/disprove) and in some cases/breeds, they are rare and could possibly be the result of either an injury or could be a congenital fluke which will/should not be passed to future pups. They recommend that the breeder should not breed two dogs with either the same or similar eye issues as a "just in case" precaution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So there can be issues that are noted as breeders option that can be inheritable traits in one breed and not in another?

I am learning a lot about the eye stuff lately, thought I was getting things figured out after getting all the EIC and CNM squared away...
 
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