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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not to far away from starting the collar conditioning process with my dog. I'm following Fowl Dawgs and when he does collar conditioning he gives the command then gives a nick the gives the command again. I have only done collar conditioning one other time and I did it following the book by Tom Dokken and he teaches collar conditioning by saying the command then giving a nick while also giving pressure from the collar. What are the reasons for giving the command twice with a nick in between rather than just once? It seems like the way Tom Dokken does it follows more with the way formal on is taught. I'm just trying to figure out which is the best way to do collar conditioning. Thanks
 

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Lardy has an excellent DVD on CC worth the purchase in my opinion.
 

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I am not familiar with Fowl Dogs. However, on ecollar conditioning I do not say the command twice. I follow Lardy's program mentioned above. Are you possibly talking about the forcing to the pile procedure? Where the force on back is given with two backs? Back, nick, back.
 

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Definitely worth buying lardy DVD. But I would go with the command a nick and pressure. To show the dog the relation between the two. That the nick will eventually take over the pressure
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am not familiar with Fowl Dogs. However, on ecollar conditioning I do not say the command twice. I follow Lardy's program mentioned above. Are you possibly talking about the forcing to the pile procedure? Where the force on back is given with two backs? Back, nick, back.
On Fowl Dawgs he sandwiches a nick in between the command. He does it with sit, here, and heel, not just during the forcing to pile.
 

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I don't think the two commands are necessary but if you are using Fowl Dogs I would stay with his program because I don't know how this step interfaces with the rest of his program.
 

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In my interpretation of Mike's material, he does the same.
Mine as well. Hillman also uses command - nick - command. The second command encourages stability. Remember that the dog has no idea what that nick means. If you "Sit" - nick and dog jumps or spins, the follow up "Sit" is logical IMO.

Regardless, if you have chosen to use Rick Stawski's program, I'd follow it to the letter unless I came to something that didn't work out as planned. Later in training when using indirect pressure the nick is usually sandwhiched between command such as toot-nick-toot.
 

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Know what? I was wrong. I went back and reviewed the manual and the video and Mike's not sandwiching the command! (on the e-collar conditioning)

Chris
 

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Know what? I was wrong. I went back and reviewed the manual and the video and Mike's not sandwiching the command! (on the e-collar conditioning)

Chris
But he does sandwhich when introducing indirect pressure.
 

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But he does sandwhich when introducing indirect pressure.
Yes, absolutely he does. I personally had confused the "back" - nick - "back" and the "toot"- nick - "toot" with his also doing it in Total E Collar conditioning. Then I checked the manual this AM and found it nowhere....so I pulled out the old VHS (a neighbor had the DVD) and sure enough, it was just :

"sit"-nick, or "here"-nick...no sandwich!

It's all good.

Chris
 
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