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I have always had to deal with Algae/Primrose/Hydrilia

SePro is a manufacturer of Fish/Wildlife/Animal safe products. Below is a link to their website. I might also suggest using their product,Sonar RTU. It keeps you from having to always do a massive kill or treatment for seasonal outbreaks.

Their website has plenty of info and their tech department is excellent. Remember treatment can only begin when the water starts to warm. Good Luck.

It's also 600 dollars a quart.
Pete
 

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I’m fairly sure Sonar is the proprietary name for aquatic glyphosate, same product costs more.
The lesser and more efficacious evil. But you gotta stay on top of the vegetation like, you know, minute to minute.

Tobi, you got a couple options on a small vegetation-choked pond - rent it out to the NAVHDA boys for their "duck search" (they - er, we - love them continental breeds egg-beatin' their way through a lily pad, right, Pete?) or get after it the minute growth starts, which may mean you're "harvesting" it by rowboat or in your waders if the pond ain't too deep. In my custodial duties, mostly on aquatic primrose, I get in the water with it like I do with puppies, and have myself a picking party and upper body workout - bringing up the whole "raft" of roots for each plant without breaking it off which encourages more (and instant) growth. Easy enough to do the weeding water ballet if you've got uniform depth in your pond.

MG
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The lesser and more efficacious evil. But you gotta stay on top of the vegetation like, you know, minute to minute.

Tobi, you got a couple options on a small vegetation-choked pond - rent it out to the NAVHDA boys for their "duck search" (they - er, we - love them continental breeds egg-beatin' their way through a lily pad, right, Pete?) or get after it the minute growth starts, which may mean you're "harvesting" it by rowboat or in your waders if the pond ain't too deep. In my custodial duties, mostly on aquatic primrose, I get in the water with it like I do with puppies, and have myself a picking party and upper body workout - bringing up the whole "raft" of roots for each plant without breaking it off which encourages more (and instant) growth. Easy enough to do the weeding water ballet if you've got uniform depth in your pond.

MG
Yes - a duck search in this little pond would be pretty ideal for the NAVHDA people LOL.... Unfortunately a vast majority of the pond is too deep. I'd guess between 5-9 feet, except around the edge to try to remove them physically. The weeds were there when we bought the property nearly 4 yrs ago and they have only gotten worse, not better. I look at this video a couple of years ago (ED A, she is a 9 month old daughter of Joe (Knockout Punch II). The weeds were not nearly as bad then as they are now, even though we tried to manage them chemically the last 2 years.

If I could talk my husband into cutting a few of the trees surrounding the pond I'd be happy. hahaha!

Thanks again to everyone for the information! Oh, this area has Zero agriculture - ozark hills cattle country.
 

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The weeds were there when we bought the property nearly 4 yrs ago and they have only gotten worse, not better.
That looks like my swim by pond before I started using copper sulfate. It doesn't take very much if I start in the spring before there are many weeds.
 
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Dave Kress has the best long-term solution, if you control the adjacent land. Try to prevent sources of nutrients (livestock manure, crop and grass fertilizers, etc.) from flowing into the pond. Roads with loose soil near the pond are also a source of nutrients. If livestock drink out of the pond, try to limit their access to only a part of the shoreline. If possible, a swath of un-mowed vegetation ringing the pond (doesn't have to come right up to the edge, if you want a clearer shoreline) can capture part of the runoff from adjacent fields.
 
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Our club has had luck with a mixture of grass carp and Tilapia. The Tilapia need to be in before seasonal growth begins. Don't know the ratio.
 

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Dave Kress has the best long-term solution, if you control the adjacent land. Try to prevent sources of nutrients (livestock manure, crop and grass fertilizers, etc.) from flowing into the pond. Roads with loose soil near the pond are also a source of nutrients. If livestock drink out of the pond, try to limit their access to only a part of the shoreline. If possible, a swath of un-mowed vegetation ringing the pond (doesn't have to come right up to the edge, if you want a clearer shoreline) can capture part of the runoff from adjacent fields.
What if the land around the ponds are used for land application of the entire winter storage of dairy waste which makes the grass grow for silage that requires zero commercial fertilizer? Ugh... which the grass growing is what has paid the bills to keep the place open for people to use for the last 50 years??? It's not an easy balance.
 

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Our club has had luck with a mixture of grass carp and Tilapia. The Tilapia need to be in before seasonal growth begins. Don't know the ratio.
Mike, thanks - do tilapia overwinter over in Ohio? Unaware of any such success couple states over from you.

Always looking for a symbiotic deal that pays off for the bipeds (us) - say like harvesting your tilapia in the fall "if they're biting" and don't overwinter. Or in re DrEdA's broaching pulling a rake behind a boat for lily pad removal, doing essentially same for watermeal (another pond plague) with a dragline and composting it for garden use.

MG
 

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I tried tilapia in S Ala. It worked well as reproduce every 14 days at 70 degrees water temp however when the water temp falls below 48 degrees they die and make a mess. Tilapia did a good job but the mess. After 3 years of effort I went to chemicals and grass carp.
I have a friend that used a cable and 2 large tractors. Was more work than initial thought but it worked.
it’s not easy Or cheap to keep ponds clean
 

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Could you bring in some of those big aquatic rats from Louisiana that eat vegetation? Or is that illegal?
Wouldn't do that, Chef Niles Bora, unless you put 'em on an armored cable leash that their big orange choppers can't chew through, and force-fetch them to take "back" and "over" and "out" commands in dispatching aquatic vegetation. But, yes, nutria is an invasive species in a couple dozen states and any retriever trainer especially a landowner with ponds, should quake at the sight of them and warm up their trigger finger.


So that's what happens when you have them go unchecked - a technical pond, when nutria got through with it, would a real nice giant mud puddle. However, I do have in mind a plan to trap a dozen or so and turn them loose on the Frozen Tundra of Lambeau Field so that the Green Bay CHOKERS and their special (needs) teams are never able to play a postseason game there ever again...

MG
 
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