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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a very nice well bred male yellow lab. He's about 16 months old and is doing very good work. I don't have tons of experience in training, and at this point, I'm breaking new ground in my experience every day. I trained a couple other dogs before (Chessie and Lab) but not very seriously - just basic retrieving to hand.

My goal with him was to be a companion - to hunt with him, train him, learn to be a better trainer, and hopefully run him in some AKC tests.

At this point, I am almost positive he'd pass the JH tests clean. I plan to run him in SH this fall assuming I can get his blind work where it needs to be. He's a very easy dog to be around - happy, cooperative, loves to train, good marker, very good drive, fast and stylish, and very calm in the house, good line manners.

The conundrum - he has only one ball.

We are going to go in this summer and find and remove the other. At this point, we're not sure it's genetic or physical and I talked to the Vet about checking that when they do it. Regardless, we are going to leave the one purely because I think it's healthier for him to be intact.

I didn't get him to breed him - but I did want that option open - I didn't check for 2 balls when I picked him up from the breeder - didn't know to check.

I got him to have a nice dog that I could train and have fun doing it with and hunt with him etc, and see where that takes me.

He's got a good pedigree with some really strong dogs not too far back (Pin Oaks Texas Rex, Teddy's Ebonstar James, M D's Cotton Pick'n Cropper), and I like how he works etc. I've had a few pros see him train, and they like him.

But what if I was to get a MH on him - would it be good to breed him in spite of the one ball? Would people (responsible people) want to? (all assuming hips eyes, elbows, all good). Should I get his hips eyes elbows checked anyway or wait to see? Do you get him tested to make sure he's actually shooting live loads with the one he has?

What if he ended up AFC? What then?

In the back of my mind I wonder about these things - I'm not too worried about it, because that's not why I'm doing it, but on one hand it would be a shame to put all that work into a dog that can't be bred when the effort could be put into a dog that can be bred.

Kind of a hard thing for me to explain - I don't think it's a waste, because I'm learning and I like doing it and I really like him. I wish he had 2. I know it sounds like I'm getting ahead of myself since we've not achieved anything so far, but it's not that, it's just wondering.
 

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It's my understanding that this is hereditary, having had a dog with a retained testicle.....my researching plus veterinary advice. I wouldn't breed the dog. It's good that you're having the retained one removed...personally, I'd take 'em both, but that's just what I did with mine. I would not breed to a dog with one testicle either.
 

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Do you see yourself hunting without him (for his foreseeable lifetime)? I'm guessing NO. Why not put the training into him and see what he becomes? You're only making him and yourself better for hunting if nothing else. Perhaps I don't understand the situation though.
 

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You need to have both Seamus's nuts removed since a monorchid should never be bred, then you can continue to learn and have fun with him.
 

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My goal with him was to be a companion - to hunt with him, train him, learn to be a better trainer, and hopefully run him in some AKC tests.

I got him to have a nice dog that I could train and have fun doing it with and hunt with him etc, and see where that takes me.

I don't think it's a waste, because I'm learning and I like doing it and I really like him.
Read these words YOU wrote lots of times. This is what's important. There are thousands of dogs that cannot or should not be bred for lots of reasons. You have one of them. Quit worrying about it. He is still a nice dog. Even if he gets every title in the world, people will choose a stud with 2 testicles. That's just how it is.
 

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Whether it's criptorchid/monorchid the dog should be neutered. Both are inheritable as I understand it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Chapel Hill - where are you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Whether it's criptorchid/monorchid the dog should be neutered. Both are inheritable as I understand it.
I think criptorchid/monorchid dogs should not be bred. There are other health reasons not to neuter a dog besides breeding status. I do plan to have them find and remove the offending testicle because they are prone to cancer. I plan to leave the other.

Are there any FC dogs out there that have this problem? Do folks breed to them? At some point, the other outstanding attributes of a dog would outweigh the uniball situation in regards to breeding. I suspect there are few if any because folks who end up training dogs to that level knew to check for two, or because they wash them out.

There is another situation that can cause a testicle not to descend that is not genetic. It involves the cord being looped around the nut or something like that, which makes it impossible for it to drop. I plan to ask the vet to check if that is the situation - I don't think it is, but if that was the case, there would be no genetic reason not to breed.

In my personal situation it doesn't matter much, it' more of a hypothetical question. I don't expect him to be a field trial champion, and may never even run him there. I love the dog, and love working with him, and I'm going to take him as far as we go. In a way I'm glad I didn't check for two because I'd have taken his brother instead, and missed out on him.
 

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Perhaps the question will have more merit after you find out the condition or reason. I'm guessing your odds of the cord issue are low.
 

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I have had five intact Golden males in a row, all of them have been nice dogs with clearances and either MH titles, QAA or both, and until my latest dog, I never considered breeding them. Actually my first dog was eleven when Jackie Mertens stayed with us for a week and fell in love with him. We ended up breeding him three times, eleven pups each litter. We didn't keep any of the pups, but we received good reports about them. Point is I trained and ran my dogs for them, not for breeding, there are allways nice litters to chose from when it is time for another dog.

John
 

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There's been at least one NFC that had only one descended testicle. He was not bred much.

WRL
 
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