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I shot a buck rabbit in the garden the last night, but he's been around a bit. Not really sure of the best way to deal with him.

Normally I'm pretty selective about the ones I knock over, I take the three quarter grown ones or wee fryers, but this old bugger had to go. He's mostly composed of my young cabbage and spinach plants, plus a garnish of new clematis shoots; this is one bad bunny and a .22 air rifle slug in the ear'ole was the only way to negotiate.

Who has a really tasty recipe for him? He's a case for the slow cooker sure enough, but any suggestions as to how and with what side dishes are welcome.

Eug
 

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Cook low and slow for longer than you would the younins'. My mom would bread them up and fry them like chicken and in the oven to make them tender. The only thing you can't get rid of is the stringiness (is that even a word).
I don't eat rabbit anymore. I had my fill as a kid, we raised them for food.
 

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Wow there's going to be some mighty disappointed children around there when the Easter Bunny is a no-show on Sunday.
 

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We shoot alot of snow hoe hare ( Varrying hare) and they are tough to start with. I cook them up in a slow cooker with a can of sprite ( or 7UP) a package of onion soup mix, sliced onion and water. Leave it in all day while at work and the meat literally falls off of the bone, very tender! The broth can be used for many soups but I strain the broth and keep the onions and use the broth and onions for french onion soup, put a biscuit or piece of toast in the bowl and grate mozerella cheese over it, viola!
 

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Here's another that I found but havent used ( I've got the meat cubed and in the freezer )

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds rabbit meat, cleaned and cut into pieces
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 pound bacon, diced
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped shallots
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon chicken bouillon granules
  • 1 tablespoon currant jelly
  • 10 black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Directions

  1. Place bacon in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium high heat until evenly brown. Drain on paper towels and set aside. Sprinkle rabbit with salt and coat with 1/3 cup flour, shaking off excess. Brown rabbit in remaining bacon fat. Remove from skillet, along with all but 2 tablespoons of the fat, and reserve.
  2. Saute shallots and garlic in skillet for about 4 minutes, until tender. Stir in wine, 1 cup water and bouillon. Heat to boiling, then stir in jelly, peppercorns, bay leaf, rosemary and thyme. Return rabbit and bacon to skillet. Heat to boiling, then reduce heat to low. Cover and let simmer about 1 1/2 hours or until rabbit is tender.
  3. Remove bay leaf and discard. Place rabbit on a warm platter and keep warm while preparing gravy.
  4. To Make Gravy: Stir lemon juice into skillet with cooking liquid. Combine 3 tablespoons water with 2 tablespoons flour and mix together; stir mixture into skillet over low heat. Finally, stir in thyme. Pour gravy over stew and serve, or pour into a gravy boat and serve on the side.
 

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Bunny poppers just in time for Easter. ;)
Basically debone, cut into strips wrap around Jalapeno, with bacon, BBQ fast and quick, slather with teriaki sauce. Did this with the last tough scrawny rabbit that end-up in my duck bag. Poppers make dang ole duck taste good, Bunny popper are much tastier than that. I usually soak the meat in OJ the morning prior to cook, that makes them tangy
 

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My grandfather, an immigrant from Belgium, loved rabbit. As I approached my teen age years I would take the old double barrel out & knock off a young one. Very good :).

On a sadder note, some years later, I am working in Butte & the local paper notes an old rancher (84) who died of tularemia. He apparently liked rabbit better than beef as he left an estate valued @ over 8 million dollars.
 
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