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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Upon seeing a curly up close, I must admit that it was a really nice looking dog. I had not seen curlies before, only in photos. Some questions:

What are their characteristics?

How many curly owners are using them in the field?

I have never seen anyone hunting with one. Where are they most popular?
 

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Curliest at one time where the most popular. They were considered the " gameskeepers" dog.
I've seen a few and a good friend has one. The ones ive seen are typically softer and have a bit less drive than my labs. But also calm quicker around house , kids etc and was very steady at a young age.
My buddies dogs coat can get a but oily when in the water alot but the dog never seems to stink.
If I could find a well bred hunting line litter I'd be interested in one. But believe it or not the litters I've looked into as soon as I said I'd try to train to ft I was cut short quickly......
 

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I don't even know where to start with your first question! LOL Perhaps it would be best to go to www.ccrca.org and read a little more about us.

Curly-Coated Retrievers are loyal, ready for almost anything, tenacious and, as our standard says, wickedly smart. They seem ready to go when you need it, but can also sack out on the sofa with you in a heartbeat. They don't respond well to repetition, so you have to keep training fresh and varied. You also have to accept that they may have their own way of doing things. It will get the job done, but it may not be precisely what you were expecting. Our standard also says that they might be aloof, but that is because they think, clearly, they are the best thing around. Just ask them!

The number of Curlies in the field grows every year. You are starting to see more and more of them at hunt tests. But our bread and butter are the hunters you never see. We have hundreds of dogs placed with people who would tell you a Curly is the only breed they would ever hunt over. You will notice that I said hundreds because our numbers are small and we kind of like it that way.

There are concentrations of Curlies in various parts of the country, but probably not very many if you live near NYC.

Our National Specialty is being held in September in Ohio. Specialties showcase all the various activities at which Curlies excel. It might be worth a trip!

Ellen Manes
President
Curly-Coated Retriever Club of America
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
...
If I could find a well bred hunting line litter I'd be interested in one. But believe it or not the litters I've looked into as soon as I said I'd try to train to ft I was cut short quickly......
What's the problem---people who think their dogs shouldn't be worked?
 

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A curly named HRCH UH UCH PODUNK'S BETTER DAYS AHEAD was entered at the Spring Grand by Sarah Shull. Her dog went out after the 2nd call back.
 

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Tough question to answer.....
How do you answer it when it is asked about labs or goldens, the characteristics can vary widely between lines and litters and what one person/breeder finds the most desirable, the next person finds the least.
We have curlies, and as a breed, I would say a safe generalization is we still have a breed that looks like it is supposed to while getting the job done.
Some run field trials, some do best at upland, some would be happy to never work a day in their lives, as with any retriever breed. We train ours just like any retriever, as individuals. The gene pool is small, the deck is stacked against you if you are looking for the hottest field trial prospect, but you could easily find a good family dog that is not over the top that will hunt with you every weekend at whatever speed you'd like to go.
Go see them, spend some time with them. And if in Michigan, you can come throw birds for ours anytime!
Sarah
 

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If you like curlies and that is the dog that you want then get one and be happy with your choice. Know that if it is performance and trainability that you want then get a lab, but everybody is not wired like that so go for what will make you happy.
 

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Years ago, there was a well-known CCR breeder near where I live. I think their prefix was "Windpatch". I visited one of their litters and got to meet their outstanding dog, "Limey". He was a magnificent dog. I believe it was his photo that was used by AKC for their Standard of the Breed photo for many years. They had also imported a lovely bitch from Australia named Pamika Gypsy Moth, who was, unfortunately, sterile.

We were told that in Australia they were used to hunt all types of game, fur & feathers. The tight curls, we were told, shed just about every kind of debris.

I was impressed with their physical stature ... larger than the Labs or Goldens & very deep through the chest. Limey looked like he could take on any situation in the field; a powerfully built dog; a very impressive presence.
 

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I also like performance and trainability and I also train curlies.

I hate wide vague statements about a breed as a whole.....There are very few things that can be said that is true about every individual in a breed. Besides having 2 eyes, 2 ears, 4 legs, and a tail.................

Every dog in every breed is an individual and should be treated as such.



My first dog was a field bred golden. She was your typical go go go, fast, quick, birdy as all get out. Had a blast training her! She achieved many titles and honorifics and turned heads with her flashy style. I saw my first curly when my golden was a year old and 6 years later I had my first Curly-Coated Retriever. A sassy little Liver Bitch who keeps me on my toes.

Together we train in competitive Obedience, Rally Obedience, Agility, Dock Jumping, AKC hunt tests, HRC Hunt tests, Conformation and anything else we might want to! I wouldn't say she is lacking in the "Trainability" department. I enjoy walking to any line with her. I do not hunt with her. But she would be up for that if it was somthing I wanted her to do. Her biggest pleasure in life is pleasing me. To be told she is a good girl and a scratch on the head is good enough for her. She is independent but also likes to be with me and do stuff. She learns quickly and bores easily. She typically tests better than she trains. She is social but would rather hang with people she knows. She gets along well with other dogs. She can tend to overthink things and get herself in trouble. But Once she understands a concept things go rather smoothly. She loves water and would stay in it all day long if she could. Fun Bumpers make it all worth wile and she loves to retrieve.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSqItWLySRs&feature=youtu.be
Video of Qwiks Master Triple, Diversion shot and Blind



I also have had the pleasure of training my brothers personal hunting dog.

I would say he is one of the best family/hunting dogs for the average person. My brother hunts as much as he possibly can in his limited time. He is a self employed Rough Construction Contractor. But he takes a few weeks a year and goes out west or up to Canada to hunt with his friends. He hunts any early mornings he can squeeze in before work, or after work if he gets off early. In the off season, Diesel is the perfect dog. He will happily play by himself with a log or retrieve rocks off the bottom of the pond all day. If you would like to take him on a hike or throw a ball for him he would be more than happy to partake in that. He is calm around the house and may or may not bark when you come to visit. He plays well with other dogs and will honor another dog retrieving in his blind. He likes to greet strangers but is very loyal to his own family and inner circle of friends. He LOVES goose hunting as the challenge of tackling a cripple is right up his alley.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UU_sBkvosmY&feature=youtu.be
Video of Diesel Being Diesel



Here is Sarah Shulls(who posted above) Rhino in a challenging Master test last year. This was the first series and he went on to Pass and Finish his title.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fcVJYNun_w&feature=youtu.behttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fcVJYNun_w&feature=youtu.behttp://

Any more questions go ahead and ask. Like most dog people I LOVE talking about my dogs. Don't us curly people have a "Kinky but Friendly" motto????
 

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That was a good Video of a Curly. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Nice video.

I just want to say again that the curly I saw was a very handsome male. When I looked at him up close, the coat was different from what I expected. I hope that I get to see some more in the field.

What happens when a curly gets into burdock? For comparison, in a longer haired golden the hair just keeps wrapping around it and you have a big mess.
 

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Nice video, but a poor test set up, IMO. You could not see a big Curly, in the grass, on the right and left marks, so the judges would never be able to judge an AWS or Boykin (or Barbet). I know that AKC Retriever tests are a Lab's game, but now that all the other breeds have been allowed, the judges need to take that into consideration when setting up. JMO
 

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Nice video, but a poor test set up, IMO. You could not see a big Curly, in the grass, on the right and left marks, so the judges would never be able to judge an AWS or Boykin (or Barbet). I know that AKC Retriever tests are a Lab's game, but now that all the other breeds have been allowed, the judges need to take that into consideration when setting up. JMO
Maybe a good topic for another thread.
 

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I am a professional groomer so I can give good grooming advice! :)

My own curlies coat is very short. In general, their coat is very soft and silky and tightly curled. Most people think they are course and wirey and greasy. Being so soft the burrs typically don't stick. They fall off or are easily picked off. The little green burrs can be a pain. But a simple combing or slicker brushing they come out really easily.

Most curlies grow a little extra length on their ears, chest, butt cheeks and tail. For show, this is trimmed to create an even appearance. So a shaggy curly might pick up more debris due to the length but if kept tidy its not an issue.

With my golden...even though she has a short field type coat....a burr will create some grooming for me to brush it out and break up the burr. But the curlies are a breeze


 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
RetrieverLuvr

Thanks. My grooming tends to be no nonsense, down and dirty. Of course my dog can get to look like it has alopecia.

Nice pics of the CCR coat. Next time I see one I am going to touch it.
 

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I recently just picked up my first curly about 2 months ago. When I got him I wasn't sure what to expect.. His dam is a Ch. with a SH. and his sire just has his Ch. What I have found is that he is very observant and absorbs everything! He's very birdy and I can't keep him away from dead bird or wings. His nose is strong as I find him using it often to seek what he's looking for.

In terms of water here in Ohio the water isn't that warm yet but I've had no problem getting him in the water, although he does take a cautious approach when entering. I've also found that since his coat hasn't yet fully developed his chest gets noticeably cold even on warm days.

Others have mentioned how they're slow to mature and aloof. I'm quite impressed with the way he picks up on new tasks. He does the basic commands rather well. I only have to ask him once or twice and he performs them cleanly. He also tries to anticipate what I want by picking up on my physical cues.

As far as being soft, the curlies I know take pressure well and work through it. My little guy has had the "pressure on" "pressure off" routine practiced on him and he handles it well. Now I know this isn't collar conditioning or force fetch but if this is a glimpse of what's to come he'll be fine
 

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Everything Aubrey said about coats is exactly what find too. We consider them very wash and wear. They are single coated so as things may stick to them, they are easy to get off, there is no coat to bury in to. Very minimal grooming and maintenance especially if they are working in the field, swimming and running through cover takes care of most of it.
 
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