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I need some help with delivery. I have a year old black lab male. Recently he’s started to swing about 10 yards behind me when returning from marks. He’ll skirt back behind me about 10 yards and slowly in his own time walk back to heel. He’s a stubborn dog and loves testing limits so I do think that is part of it. Light collar pressure doesn’t seem to help he just blows it off. What’s the best way to fix this? Thanks
 

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You have typed the answer in your own question. Light collar pressure is blown off. Take the retrieve out of this. Work on this in your yard without the retrieve. Put the dog on sit, walk away. Call dog to you to heal. Use the collar just as you did when collar conditioning. Get dog back in the habit of coming quickly to you to heal. When this is solid go back to playing fetch, and reinforce as necessary. It is actually simpler than it sounds when you take the retrieve out of the equation. And make it fun remember praise and saying Good Dog are a big part of this.
 

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I always tell my dogs heel about 6 feet before they get back to me on returns so when they wanna try the funny business i will give a Heel command then a Nick
 

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Post 1
The behavior your describing is called parading ! The pup is saying it’s mine and look at me. It’s cute for a moment
Ken in post 2 hit the nail on the head. Consider retreating to yard work and getting your obedience in good shape. Collar pressure is not normally a fix here however never say never.
also as a suggestion each time ( meaning every time) u get the dog out walk around at heel and do here and heel till the pup submits. It’s a conflict of wills u can’t loose.
your not the first with a hard head that wants to be in control.
good luck
Fk
 

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I keep reading the words "stubborn", "parading", "hard head", "must submit", "conflict of wills",
"funny business", "blown off", "testing limits" and "wants to be in control" coupled with emotional,
frustrations and a desire to fix things. Then I think back to a time when a pro friend of mine put things
into a blunt opinion....."It's not the dog."

I do spend quite a bit of time trying to figure out what I must do differently to teach and condition the
proper responses. I never seem to accomplish much by wanting and expecting things to magically
fall right into place unless it is presented correctly.....for the dog in question.

"Show me what you want me to do and give me a good reason for doing so" seems simple......but it
is not.
 

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The behavior your describing is called parading !
Maybe just sit your Lab in front of a mirror until he figures out he is not a Golden?;)

"Here nick Here" worked for me. Watch for the instant he breaks stride and or deviates from his line, that is the time to correct.

I agree with Ken, teach it in the yard first, separate from retrieving. He may already know it from past training but reinforcing the response in the yard will help.
 
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Now, now DP. Shirley you know. The Golden does not parade. It does "Victory Laps".😄
And it’s a beautiful thing. The off-breed retrievers just can’t do it right.
 

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I need some help with delivery. I have a year old black lab male. Recently he’s started to swing about 10 yards behind me when returning from marks. He’ll skirt back behind me about 10 yards and slowly in his own time walk back to heel. He’s a stubborn dog and loves testing limits so I do think that is part of it. Light collar pressure doesn’t seem to help he just blows it off. What’s the best way to fix this? Thanks
Perhaps another approach if you like or not to consider.
It transitions to ground easily.
Works with other breeds too.
They even want to give you it.
Of course, nobody knows your dog like you do, so there may be 100 permutations in your dog with you that can'y be covered on line, but I'm sure it has nothing to do with being a 1 year old black lab male.
 

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Something else I've found that helps me when I have a dog in for training and he or she like to swing behind me on the return is to use a prop like a fence or large object to block the dog from going very far past me. You can even use a holding blind (positioned properly) to accomplish the same thing.
 

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If the dog swings behind me I immediately start walking forward while applying appropriate pressure. Make the punishment match the crime. He's not committing murder but the behavior is unacceptable. I have a dog that likes to try this every so often.

Obviously, I only do this with a dog that 100% knows the command and is collar conditioned.
 
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