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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Used to have a very square sit to whistle. Had a very, very long wait over winter and have not trained long blinds until this week.

Dog is bonkers. She no longer sits square to the whistle but sits facing in the direction she thinks the blind is.

Drill to fix this, including any special gestures, corrections, etc., please. She has always been pristine in being square to a sit whistle until this week.

Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I will go back to rope in the yard to square her sit there, to begin with. She is CC'd. I will work on that but do you think I should still run her on blinds while doing so?

What we are doing is Danny Farmer's method of 3 cold blinds of 3 bumpers each in a different field each day. These are somewhere between 150 and 200-yard cold blinds. It is after she has retrieved the first 3-bumper pile of the first blind she wants to face that pile when I whistle sit her when she gets offline for the next pile.

She hasn't refused to sit on the whistle the first two days of total cold blinds. A friend said don't worry about her facing the wrong direction as long as she displays momentum, sits every time, and takes a cast. Farmer says not to correct on anything in these drills for 5 days.

But I would like to work on it in the yard to help her understand to sit straight. I will do the rope Darin suggested. If that doesn't work or doesn't start to translate into the cold blinds in the field, I will update.

The only field I could get in today required me to place the 3 blind piles within a 90-degree quarter--so 3 blind piles from 12 o'clock to 3 o'clock. Is that too close for training? Trying to train for senior level.

Thank you.
 

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I solved this problem with an unconventional approach.
Every day after training, I let the dog quarter out in front on the walk back to the truck.
Then whistle sit, throw a bumper in front of me, toot-toot for long come-in cast.
Then transition the routine to dog quartering, throw a bumper in front with the dog not seeing it,
whistle sit, toot-toot come in cast. Repeat after every training session almost as a game on the
way back to the truck. Dog learned long come-in casts and as a side benefit
the sits were square to the handler. If not square, I would insist of the square sit with a silent bowing motion with both hands out...then pup would be released for the come-in cast reward.
I taught this independent of blinds because I want momentum away from the handler on most blinds.

The ability to square the retriever with the silent bowing motion may be advantages
when running blinds with a dog that might auto-cast. Whistle sit, squaring the dog up,
promotes handler control and slows down the dog and handler before that first critical cast.
 
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