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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello,

Im having trouble working on doubles with my 3YO male FCR. Super high energy dog, incredible drive.

He is 75/80% steady on a place board. When healed, I warm up with single bumper starting short, then out to 20 yards.

Now I'm trying doubles. I take a bumper and toss each out sideways 10 yards. Send dog on his name and he is amazing. back healing to placeboard every time. Now when I extend the doubles, farther out, and I send the dog, he grabs the first bumper, then runs over to the second, drops 1st, picks up 2nd and runs back to me. Of course when I put a check cord on him, to prevent him from doing this, he behaves perfectly.

Any ideas on how to work on this? I thought I could go back to basics, the close in doubles. Problem is, I can do those for hours with zero issues.

Any tips appreciated!
 

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try alongside two corners of a building... or a fence....

It sounds as if you are not using an ecollar... that is ok, but will mean you have to spend more time developing/conditioning the proper response....

don't give him the opportunity to make the wrong decision until you can properly recall him when he makes the 'switch'...
 

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You know, you can trick a dog that is Rock solid a check cord and not so solid without by running with a wee little rope on the flat buckle collar. Many folk call it a tab. Just about a four or six inch piece of rope going floppity flop as it runs gives the illusion of check cord. I enjoy training with the flat coat folks who come up to our lake Champlain retriever club area in the summertime just cool folks great dog work. Many use the tabs.

Ken Bora
 

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And don't be so hard on the poor Flat-Coated retriever folk for running retrieves before they have a solid recall. most flat coats don't have a rock-solid recall until they are about 8 years old. That's a lot of plan fetch those folks will be missing if they waited. 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You know, you can trick a dog that is Rock solid a check cord and not so solid without by running with a wee little rope on the flat buckle collar. Many folk call it a tab. Just about a four or six inch piece of rope going floppity flop as it runs gives the illusion of check cord. I enjoy training with the flat coat folks who come up to our lake Champlain retriever club area in the summertime just cool folks great dog work. Many use the tabs.

Ken Bora
Good idea Ken. Tx.
 

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You are better off getting solid on singles and forget the doubles as you are just confusing the dog by throwing too short of doubles.

We have a couple of very talented Flat Coats in our group running field trials including a 2 yo that ran a difficult qual and got to the water blind at her first qual, but they were trained with a sequential program. What program are you following? I suggest you follow a program rather than pursue short multiples and also do not let him switch.
 

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Advice about getting a good recall is good. Same with doing bigger singles. However, your question was about help with doubles. At some point you are going to have to start and it would be nice to have success and not frustration! I believe it would help you quite a bit to have someone at least throw your memory bird. They can help by throwing it from farther away and thus eliminating or at least greatly reducing your dog being able to easily run over to other bumper. If the dog does try to go for the other bumper before delivering the last one down/go bumper first, you can have the thrower pick it up before dog gets to it. Thrower can also help if dog forgets, hesitates or gets lost-confused on memory bird.

Good Luck
 

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. DUDE! 😃 No debate, everybody knows that the Flat-coated Retriever is the Peter Pan of the retrieving world. Our retriever club's treasure has a cool liver flat coat named Rusty. And some others. Rusty must be near 9? And is still a frolicking like a puppy!
Ken, you nailed it. They ARE known as the Peter Pan of Retrievers because they seemingly never grow old. Most representatives of the breed maintain that youthful exuberance well into old age. It's a blessing and a curse. They are fun dogs, but also fail to take much seriously, so the standard training programs have to be tweaked a bit. Of course you couple that with many owners who either don't know how to train, make excuses for not enforcing things or simply wait until the dogs show career is over to start training for field and its no surprise they struggle on basic concepts.

As for the original poster, based on what you described, it sounds like you haven't advanced beyond a long-line yet. You really need to work on a strong recall and when you do take the long-line off, you need some other means to reinforce commands. Most folks graduate to an e-collar. If you choose not to use one, then Ken had some good advice about using a pull tab and John also had very good advice on stretching out the memory bird and having a real person out there to help and/or pick up the bumper before the dog can "switch".
 
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