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Banx - Boykin Spaniel
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Discussion Starter #21
Might have to try that. Dont have a dog right now that needs them but what ever happened to black bumpers??????? Cant find them anywhere.

Jordan I commend you on your dedication to your project and he looks like a very nice little pup. There are quite a few things I would do different but there is more than one way to skin a cat. I need to ask about doubles though. Even though he goes for the memory bumper first does he remember the other after he picks up the memory? In any case I would stop doing doubles. I will generally test a puppies aptitude for the concept and will occasionally throw doubles but not much until the dog is steady. I think most important is to let the dog tell you where he needs to go in training. Your communication with the dog is the most important part of training. Training books and videos dont tell you what to do if things dont go right. It is up to you to figure out how to make things work. You seem like a smart guy so learn the basic concepts for training from your book and videos then think for yourself on how to communicate and teach the dog those concepts.
Will be looking forward to your next video. Looks like fun, makes me want a new puppy
Steve, Definitely appreciate the input! I really have no clue what I am doing 馃槀 Just trying to take it day by day! In one of the early portions of the Smartwork Puppy Program, Mr. Graham shows a young pup doing short doubles to start working on his memory. I figured I would give it a try, not knowing what to expect. Definitely will be postponing any more of that! Excited to meet up with NateB here in the near future. I think watching someone in person working their dog will be a huge help and I will learn a ton. I have so many questions that I know videos just can't answer.
I think right now I am just so anxious to get to training. I know I have a longggg way to go!
 

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Banx - Boykin Spaniel
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Discussion Starter #22

Hey everyone! After all the help from my post last week, I decided to take it back to the basics and just run simple single marks for the week. Having tons of fun, but you can see that Banx still doesn't want to come back to me upon retrieves. Just trying to keep my consistency up from this point forward and make sure he is always on the check cord when using bumpers. Also talked a little bit about resource guarding that has been happing.

Enjoy!

Jordan
 

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Don't compare your progress with videos of dogs being trained by people that have trained many dogs. I think you said in another video that this is your first dog. You're doing great. A couple of suggestions.

1) Bring a rolled up newspaper with you when you train. Every time you find yourself saying or thinking he's "hard-headed" or "stubborn," whack yourself upside your own head with the newspaper. There are undoubtedly stubborn and hard-headed dogs, but there are mostly dogs that don't know what you want from them.

2) He IS coming back to you part way. It's the last 6 feet or so when he starts veering away. I would not reel him in like a fish on a line for those last six feet. I'd approach the issue with two tactics: make him come that last few feet and make the experience of returning to you a lot more rewarding. Take up the slack as he returns, like you're doing now, but, as he runs by, stop reeling and take a step backwards opposite the direction he's running. Say "no, come" calmly. Keep stepping backward if he doesn't come. Don't drag him and don't reel in the rope. Give little tugs or light jerks as you step back. When you drag, it sets up an opposition reflex. Little jerks are much more annoying. You have a big field there. Keep stepping backwards. (Be careful not to trip and fall on your rear.) Whenever he relents and starts moving towards you, smile and praise quietly. Stop praising the instant he turns away again, say "no, come", calmly. You have all day and a lot of field. No reeling. Eventually, he is going to get tired of those irritating tugs and come to you. Do not give up and reel him in, even if it takes 30 minutes the first time. Just take in slack, as needed Your criteria for him getting "close enough" should be black and white. I wouldn't stop the backing up and tugging until he actually touches you. HE has to touch YOU. On his own, without you pulling him into you. If he drops the bumper at any time in this process, ignore it. This is a recall lesson, not a hold lesson. The next part of the lesson is making the return a LOT more rewarding than you're making it now. When he does return and touch you, do not yank the bumper from him. You're young and probably still have good knees. Crouch down and PRAISE him WHILE HE IS HOLDING THE BUMPER (assuming he hasn't dropped it). If he has dropped it, praise him anyway. If he has the bumper, rub his sides and let him hold it for a while and tell him what a handsome dog he is with that bumper. When you feel like he's gotten the message that he is a GOOD DOG, do not yank the bumper away. Gently hold his collar and say give or release or whatever. If he doesn't release, you might lightly squeeze his lips, but hopefully he will give it up.

3) He's a puppy, but it's past time for him to stop jumping up and down before you throw the bumper. No need to be mean, no need to whack him with your rolled up newspaper. (That's for you when you blame him for not knowing what he hasn't been taught.) Just say "sit." And don't throw it until he is sitting. If he keeps doing his pogo stick routine, wait him out. At first, require only that he sit still for the count of 3. Start asking for more as he gets it through his little excited Boykin brain that No-Sit means No Bumper.

4) I know you took the ropes off the bumpers to keep him from carrying the bumper back by the rope. Opinions differ on whether the rope carrying will lead to bad bird handling. I worried about it with my first dog, didn't with my second. Neither carried ducks by their necks. My second dog still carries bumpers by the ropes and one of his favorite games is twirling and tossing the bumper as he bounds around. I know that lots of people would be appalled at the sight. He never slings ducks around. The point is, you would be able to throw the bumper a lot further if it had a rope, but that's up to you. At some point, you'll need someone to throw it for you to build distance or you'll need a winger.

Lastly: You are focusing a lot on your dog's flaws, and, of course, he's a puppy and he needs a lot of work, but maybe you aren't aware of how much you have to appreciate about your great little pupster, beside the fact that he's so adorable. His retrieving drive is fantastic. His energy is fantastic. His focus and memory, for such a young dog, are amazing. You were upset at his not doing doubles like you wanted him to. I was impressed at how he did not let himself get distracted from the first bumper and he didn't forget where it was. Of course, you'll need to train him to do doubles you way you want, but you will be grateful for that memory and focus later.

Enjoy the journey!
 

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Another great video Jordan. You are definitely in the running for the cutest pup on RTF at this time. Helpful rope tips for you. What you were doing in this most recent video is what many of us call fun bumpers or fun retrieves because you are not having your pup sit and then you are not releasing him on his name. This is hard to do when you are alone but it can be done because you have a rope. Notice how in some frames of your video the Rope goes from the collar of your pup to the ground and then up to your hands. With your pup sitting and the Rope going down to the ground step on it. This will hold the puppy place and keep him from bouncing up to your shirt pockets. Then with the pup secure you can toss the bumper Bend back down and hold your pup and then release him on his name. And when he is running out to the bumper the Rope does not need to pass through your hands at all that's just an excuse for rope burn as he gets bigger and stronger he can just drag the Rope. The only time you even need to pick it up is when he comes back or if he's not coming back. Then it's easy enough to just Scamper out a couple steps and again step on the Rope gain control and reeling back in. I could give paragraph and paragraph more but I don't need to overwhelm he's just a pup you're doing great . nice thumb.馃槑
 

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Banx - Boykin Spaniel
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Discussion Starter #25
Don't compare your progress with videos of dogs being trained by people that have trained many dogs. I think you said in another video that this is your first dog. You're doing great. A couple of suggestions.

1) Bring a rolled up newspaper with you when you train. Every time you find yourself saying or thinking he's "hard-headed" or "stubborn," whack yourself upside your own head with the newspaper. There are undoubtedly stubborn and hard-headed dogs, but there are mostly dogs that don't know what you want from them.

2) He IS coming back to you part way. It's the last 6 feet or so when he starts veering away. I would not reel him in like a fish on a line for those last six feet. I'd approach the issue with two tactics: make him come that last few feet and make the experience of returning to you a lot more rewarding. Take up the slack as he returns, like you're doing now, but, as he runs by, stop reeling and take a step backwards opposite the direction he's running. Say "no, come" calmly. Keep stepping backward if he doesn't come. Don't drag him and don't reel in the rope. Give little tugs or light jerks as you step back. When you drag, it sets up an opposition reflex. Little jerks are much more annoying. You have a big field there. Keep stepping backwards. (Be careful not to trip and fall on your rear.) Whenever he relents and starts moving towards you, smile and praise quietly. Stop praising the instant he turns away again, say "no, come", calmly. You have all day and a lot of field. No reeling. Eventually, he is going to get tired of those irritating tugs and come to you. Do not give up and reel him in, even if it takes 30 minutes the first time. Just take in slack, as needed Your criteria for him getting "close enough" should be black and white. I wouldn't stop the backing up and tugging until he actually touches you. HE has to touch YOU. On his own, without you pulling him into you. If he drops the bumper at any time in this process, ignore it. This is a recall lesson, not a hold lesson. The next part of the lesson is making the return a LOT more rewarding than you're making it now. When he does return and touch you, do not yank the bumper from him. You're young and probably still have good knees. Crouch down and PRAISE him WHILE HE IS HOLDING THE BUMPER (assuming he hasn't dropped it). If he has dropped it, praise him anyway. If he has the bumper, rub his sides and let him hold it for a while and tell him what a handsome dog he is with that bumper. When you feel like he's gotten the message that he is a GOOD DOG, do not yank the bumper away. Gently hold his collar and say give or release or whatever. If he doesn't release, you might lightly squeeze his lips, but hopefully he will give it up.

3) He's a puppy, but it's past time for him to stop jumping up and down before you throw the bumper. No need to be mean, no need to whack him with your rolled up newspaper. (That's for you when you blame him for not knowing what he hasn't been taught.) Just say "sit." And don't throw it until he is sitting. If he keeps doing his pogo stick routine, wait him out. At first, require only that he sit still for the count of 3. Start asking for more as he gets it through his little excited Boykin brain that No-Sit means No Bumper.

4) I know you took the ropes off the bumpers to keep him from carrying the bumper back by the rope. Opinions differ on whether the rope carrying will lead to bad bird handling. I worried about it with my first dog, didn't with my second. Neither carried ducks by their necks. My second dog still carries bumpers by the ropes and one of his favorite games is twirling and tossing the bumper as he bounds around. I know that lots of people would be appalled at the sight. He never slings ducks around. The point is, you would be able to throw the bumper a lot further if it had a rope, but that's up to you. At some point, you'll need someone to throw it for you to build distance or you'll need a winger.

Lastly: You are focusing a lot on your dog's flaws, and, of course, he's a puppy and he needs a lot of work, but maybe you aren't aware of how much you have to appreciate about your great little pupster, beside the fact that he's so adorable. His retrieving drive is fantastic. His energy is fantastic. His focus and memory, for such a young dog, are amazing. You were upset at his not doing doubles like you wanted him to. I was impressed at how he did not let himself get distracted from the first bumper and he didn't forget where it was. Of course, you'll need to train him to do doubles you way you want, but you will be grateful for that memory and focus later.

Enjoy the journey!
Hey Kelly, I really appreciate the feedback and help! Definitely learning patience I never knew I had before, and getting better every day. Really big thank you for the recall help. I will start doing that immediately and show how its been going next Sunday! I have SO much to learn and appreciate all the help from this great community!
You guys have helped me more than you will ever know!
-Jordan
 

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Hi Jordan.
I'll start by saying you do a great job with you videos. Wish I could do as well. Now if your dog training was as good as your videos you would have it made;):p:D. Just teasin a little.
You stated that he is a super stubborn dog. Well he is almost 6 months old and in my opinion it is time for him to grow up a bit. I also think a good bit of that is an inadvertently trained response. What I see is that he has been allowed to have his way a bit too much and it has become habit. He seems like a very nice little dog and has plenty of drive. I think he needs and can handle more discipline on your part.
Now on the retrieving part I would stop just tossing the bumper and letting him go. You need to start adding structure to your lessons instead of just mindless go go go. You want him to go but from what I see continuing on that path just creates neurotic behavior in retrieving. Ad structure I would no longer just let him go with out a release and I would use his name instead of the word fetch. Save fetch for force fetch. When you get to that point the word fetch needs to have special meaning. I would throw the bumper and hold on to him and only allow the retrieve when released on his name. Get down on the ground with him and hold on and judging by what I see from him I would not just hold him by the collar, he's just going to yank you around and lose focus on the bumper. I would put him between my legs with my left hand holding him behind and under his left leg and on his chest holding his front legs off the ground. Toss the bumper and release. Start by releasing him with his name before the bumper even hits the ground gradually holding him longer as his understanding of the game increases. I do this with puppies as soon as I know they have the drive and desire to retrieve generally around 12 weeks.
You are also waaaay better than I with a rope. To me a rope is the last resort and I only use it if I absolutely have to. I work hard to avoid it from the very start by teaching that coming back to me is just as fun as the retrieve and if he does he gets another. When I bring a pup home I am his whole world, I am mother! Bill Hillmans way is make him crazy for the retrieve and I say be careful what you ask for. In my opinion you have gone a bit far with that and need to gain some control. Balance is extremely important and should be kept in mind from day one. You now have issues that I believe could have been avoided and will be harder to correct. Not at all saying you have to be the a marine corp drill instructor (yet) but if you start out in the begining you can avoid that all together which is always my goal. It was mentioned not to reel him in like a fish and I agree with that method and with your rope skills it may work good for you. Me, I just get myself and the dog tangled. IF and I want to emphasize IF I ever do use a rope I do not even hold on to the rope just dont throw the bumper farther than the end of the rope, been there done that馃槕. He is coming back your direction but running past you. When he gets near I would just step on the rope so he cant get away and walk up the rope till I'm 3 or 4 feet away then get on my knees and coax him to me and if need be slight tugs off and on to get him too you then praise the livin crap out of him. Dont just chase him down and take the bumper get hi to come to you! Make coming to you as fun as the retrieve and teach him that bring it back gets him another retrieve. In your retrieves he is just mindlessly running fetching and keeping. When you REEL him in you just take the bumper and throw again with very little praise. Get animated and make coming back fun too! He need structure and discipline in his lessons but it need to be fun too.
To help with this I would start formal obedience NOW. I would go right now today and buy a prong collar. I have trained a good number of dogs and the prong collar is the very best tool I have if used correctly. In your last video you took a pretty good hike and you said he drug you all the way. I would put a stop to that asap! Put the prong collar on and use your rope when you go for a walk and let him learn by himself just where the end of the rope is. Never just let him pull on the rope. Let him feel the pressure of the collar then release the pressure on the rope. You really have to do nothing but let off pressure as he comes to the end of the rope then let him find the end again the release pressure he will teach himself. To me the prong collar is magical and takes very little pressure and training. Once he is conditioned to the prong collar you can start shortening up on the rope. I would probably make a new shorter rope for this, maybe about 10 feet then down to a 6 ft leash and start teaching him to heel. Actually lots of details to between the lines in a written post But it takes me for ever to write this. I hope this will help because I see a very nice pup and a guy that is excited about training him. I like an eager student in both man and beast and when I do I am eager to help. Keep up the good work!
 

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Banx - Boykin Spaniel
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Discussion Starter #28
Hi Jordan.
I'll start by saying you do a great job with you videos. Wish I could do as well. Now if your dog training was as good as your videos you would have it made;):p:D. Just teasin a little.
You stated that he is a super stubborn dog. Well he is almost 6 months old and in my opinion it is time for him to grow up a bit. I also think a good bit of that is an inadvertently trained response. What I see is that he has been allowed to have his way a bit too much and it has become habit. He seems like a very nice little dog and has plenty of drive. I think he needs and can handle more discipline on your part.
Now on the retrieving part I would stop just tossing the bumper and letting him go. You need to start adding structure to your lessons instead of just mindless go go go. You want him to go but from what I see continuing on that path just creates neurotic behavior in retrieving. Ad structure I would no longer just let him go with out a release and I would use his name instead of the word fetch. Save fetch for force fetch. When you get to that point the word fetch needs to have special meaning. I would throw the bumper and hold on to him and only allow the retrieve when released on his name. Get down on the ground with him and hold on and judging by what I see from him I would not just hold him by the collar, he's just going to yank you around and lose focus on the bumper. I would put him between my legs with my left hand holding him behind and under his left leg and on his chest holding his front legs off the ground. Toss the bumper and release. Start by releasing him with his name before the bumper even hits the ground gradually holding him longer as his understanding of the game increases. I do this with puppies as soon as I know they have the drive and desire to retrieve generally around 12 weeks.
You are also waaaay better than I with a rope. To me a rope is the last resort and I only use it if I absolutely have to. I work hard to avoid it from the very start by teaching that coming back to me is just as fun as the retrieve and if he does he gets another. When I bring a pup home I am his whole world, I am mother! Bill Hillmans way is make him crazy for the retrieve and I say be careful what you ask for. In my opinion you have gone a bit far with that and need to gain some control. Balance is extremely important and should be kept in mind from day one. You now have issues that I believe could have been avoided and will be harder to correct. Not at all saying you have to be the a marine corp drill instructor (yet) but if you start out in the begining you can avoid that all together which is always my goal. It was mentioned not to reel him in like a fish and I agree with that method and with your rope skills it may work good for you. Me, I just get myself and the dog tangled. IF and I want to emphasize IF I ever do use a rope I do not even hold on to the rope just dont throw the bumper farther than the end of the rope, been there done that馃槕. He is coming back your direction but running past you. When he gets near I would just step on the rope so he cant get away and walk up the rope till I'm 3 or 4 feet away then get on my knees and coax him to me and if need be slight tugs off and on to get him too you then praise the livin crap out of him. Dont just chase him down and take the bumper get hi to come to you! Make coming to you as fun as the retrieve and teach him that bring it back gets him another retrieve. In your retrieves he is just mindlessly running fetching and keeping. When you REEL him in you just take the bumper and throw again with very little praise. Get animated and make coming back fun too! He need structure and discipline in his lessons but it need to be fun too.
To help with this I would start formal obedience NOW. I would go right now today and buy a prong collar. I have trained a good number of dogs and the prong collar is the very best tool I have if used correctly. In your last video you took a pretty good hike and you said he drug you all the way. I would put a stop to that asap! Put the prong collar on and use your rope when you go for a walk and let him learn by himself just where the end of the rope is. Never just let him pull on the rope. Let him feel the pressure of the collar then release the pressure on the rope. You really have to do nothing but let off pressure as he comes to the end of the rope then let him find the end again the release pressure he will teach himself. To me the prong collar is magical and takes very little pressure and training. Once he is conditioned to the prong collar you can start shortening up on the rope. I would probably make a new shorter rope for this, maybe about 10 feet then down to a 6 ft leash and start teaching him to heel. Actually lots of details to between the lines in a written post But it takes me for ever to write this. I hope this will help because I see a very nice pup and a guy that is excited about training him. I like an eager student in both man and beast and when I do I am eager to help. Keep up the good work!
Steve, I really appreciate the input! Everyone on this forum just keeps surprising me with their willingness help teach! I am really glad that I have consistently heard 3 times in a row now that I need more structure and discipline! Time to step up my game, and really be consistent.
Again, thank you so much for the help!
 

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Something you might want to try is using a platform to send and receive the dog. I used a platform to help teach stand-alones. (Leaving dog on a sit, walking away, and throwing a bumper). A platform helps clarify to a dog what you want. Connie Cleveland is a big advocate of platforms. She uses dog cots for platforms: fairly inexpensive, light-weight (easy to carry around), and available in many sizes. In this video, you will see her using platforms for puppies doing retrieves:
The video is actually an advertisement for her $97 performance puppy course. I've never purchased it and can't vouch for it one way or the other, and am NOT suggesting you buy it. However, just watching the advertisement video, I think, will give you the idea about using platforms in combination with a long line. Connie Cleveland has put AFC or FCs (field trial championships) and OTCHs (Obedience Trial Championships) on multiple dogs. She is one of the best dog trainers in the world. Unfortunately, she doesn't have a training series devoted entirely to hunt/field training. (Her "Obedience Road" training set advertised on the same site is for competition obedience training; it would have little relevance to hunt training.)
 
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Banx - Boykin Spaniel
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Discussion Starter #31

Hey Everyone,

Just finished my 4th episode with Banx! Taking everyones advice, I did start formal obedience this week and wow, am I having fun! Adding structure to his life has completely changed his behavior for the better. Still have LOTS to do, but extremely happy! I will admit that I need to be better on standards inside the home. If you watch the video from today vs. last week, I think you will notice that he is almost like a completely different dog.

Now it's just a matter of staying consistent, and keep having fun.

I appreciate everyones input, and really taking it all in without being overwhelmed.

-Jordan
 

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Banx - Boykin Spaniel
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Discussion Starter #32
I apologize for the video quality in this Ep. 4. Not a clue what happened in my editing process, but it completely trashed the video quality. Super disappointed because this has been my favorite video yet...

I hope you guys can watch it through the terrible quality and still enjoy the content!
 

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Another great video Jordan. You have a very smart dog. The sloppy sit you keep correcting with your arm. Is because your pup is so smart. In all of your healing in that video when you were walking you turned to your right. You did it so often that when you stop and your pup sits he sits in a fashion that he is anticipating you turning to your right. One time only at the 5:45 Mark in the video you turned to your left and said sit. This confused your pup and he actually sat perfectly and you praised him nicely good job. Doing your healing drills your turns must be both Direction and random to keep your pup from anticipating what way you are going because you have a smart pop his anticipation ability is high. And the part about forgetting your bumpers made me laugh. Over the years I have left ducks on the kitchen table forgot the shotgun 1 time one time only I forgot to put the dogs on the truck. That is something the Fellers in the training group don't let you forget.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Another great video Jordan. You have a very smart dog. The sloppy sit you keep correcting with your arm. Is because your pup is so smart. In all of your healing in that video when you were walking you turned to your right. You did it so often that when you stop and your pup sits he sits in a fashion that he is anticipating you turning to your right. One time only at the 5:45 Mark in the video you turned to your left and said sit. This confused your pup and he actually sat perfectly and you praised him nicely good job. Doing your healing drills your turns must be both Direction and random to keep your pup from anticipating what way you are going because you have a smart pop his anticipation ability is high. And the part about forgetting your bumpers made me laugh. Over the years I have left ducks on the kitchen table forgot the shotgun 1 time one time only I forgot to put the dogs on the truck. That is something the Fellers in the training group don't let you forget.
That is a very good observation Ken, thank you! I guess I started doing lots of right turns only because it was what would catch Banx off guard most of the time as he gets distracted looking to the left. I will definitely add more left turns and even it up. After a great conversation with Chris over the phone, he gave me some good arguments as to why I may want to consider heeling on both sides, and I just recently decided that is what I am going to do. I have not done any heeling on my right yet, only my left. How/when do I incorporate him heeling on my right side? Once he has a solid left side heel down? Or just randomly put him in heel using hand signals and walking him on left and right.
Thanks again
-Jordan
 

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One of the longest-running arguments here on the RTF is single side vs. two-sided heeling. A great many Folk who try to follow closely the Mike lardy system heel both sides. A great many hunters heel both sides too many advantages to bother typing.
And a great many old school, hardcore field trial Folk with more blue ribbons than a Pabst Brewery heel single side.
I use both sides.
I would start right now.
I would not tell Ted Shih.馃槒
 

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One of the longest-running arguments here on the RTF is single side vs. two-sided heeling. A great many Folk who try to follow closely the Mike lardy system heel both sides. A great many hunters heel both sides too many advantages to bother typing.
And a great many old school, hardcore field trial Folk with more blue ribbons than a Pabst Brewery heel single side.
I use both sides.
I would start right now.
I would not tell Ted Shih.馃槒



Dont tell me either ;) :). I believe there is too much to worry about one side and two just adds to the confusion. I have tried it and just dont like it. Dog does fine but I dont馃槚. Very observant of you Ken on the turns and agree.
I would not reach down and physically put him in the correct position when he sits crooked. I would somewhat telegraph your intentions by slowing down and slightly put pressure on the lead and say sit while he is already in the proper position, dont wait for him to turn out and look up at you. Use the tools (leash/collar) you have to manipulate him into the proper position before he sits. I would do this now and always. I also would incorporate a heeling stick. Chain it together with the pressure on the collar by just a tap on the chest if he gets out in front of you or when you come to a stop and want a good sit. Also can use it with a tap on the butt if he doesnt sit right away. Condition him to the stick until you can use only the stick with a loose lead. The stick will become your leash when it is time to heel off leash.
One more thing I noticed was once when you had him at a remote sit he came to you without being asked. You made him sit and that was good but I would take him back to the spot where he broke the sit command and sit him there and walk away again.
I think you are doing an awesome job!!!!! I also think you are very fortunate to have such a nice little pup to learn with. He is an excellent pup for being a non black male Labrador馃槣馃槈. The video quality was fine and you are correct he is a whole different dog. Keep up the good work!
 

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Having a 13 week old Boykin that I plan to train myself, I am enjoying your videos. Certainly show a side of things that the pro programs do not spend much time on. Keep up the good work!
 

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Steve said, "Will be looking forward to your next video."

I agree and from what you have done to start with places you way ahead of the curve for a "first timer". :cool:

He also said, "Training books and videos don't tell you what to do if things don't go right. It is up to you to figure out how
to make things work."

Keep in mind that once you have successfully taught a skill, precise practice with many "reps" is significantly important.
Your pup is a quick, smart student. I can see where it would be easy to be swept up into making it a race. Speed limits
are cool.
 

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Jordan, your earlier comment about doubles and Evan's program had me recalling that the particular stage
in his progression. It is often confused with marking when it is not. The pup is sent back to a spot that has
been already identified. It quickly becomes a longer three-legged pattern that can be revisited regularly.

Eventually, it can then be stretched to longer distances. As I recall back then there were many contrary
comments in forums about throwing doubles with a young pup.....when they aren't exactly marks and
involving memory. The "pattern" takes marking out of the equation and focuses more on all of the other
skills of picking up bumpers and bringing them back to heel and deliver.


Journal notes (excerpts) from long ago:

Archive from Daisy's Journal - the early months (February & March - 2006)

Feb 1, 2006 Daisy ran a 75 yard 3 legged-pattern (bumpers at 90掳 separation)
|

note: this is not what you start with.....it builds incrementally

note: she crushed the 75 yard 3-legged pattern (right side heel & used *dead bird/back"),
bumpers are visible - watch this (visible bumpers) as Taffey became too dependent on visible bumpers,
so start mixing multiple bumper piles with orange, work mini-piles first and avoid cover (at first)

note: Daisy loves this "stuff"
note: still using "Kwick Bumpers" and her fetch/hold habits have been exceptional


Daisy
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