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Was wondering if someone could tell me what the cost is to have a litter checked for EIC. If I chose a stud dog that was a carrier would getting them checked be the best thing to do. Are breeder's charging the same to carrier versus clear? Looking for info Thanks,
 

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I believe the University of MN still charges $65/test. Check out their website for more info.

Some folks test the litter to check for carrier/clear status others sell pups as non affected with limited registration.

It is kind of up to each breeder and would depend on the caliber of the pups most likely in terms of the homes they are going to. A family gun dog buyer would likely be indifferent once they understood that a carrier is not going to have symptoms. A breeder on the other hand may only want a clear. Very dependent on your buyers.
 

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You may want to see if there is a "litter" cost for the test. We recently tested a litter for CNM and it was $50 per pup to a max cost of $300 for the litter regardless of how many more pups than 6 were being tested.
 

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This gentleman is right. I had my dog tested by the place in MN. It cost $65.00, I believe there is a litter cost where the make the detemination from the puppy's dew claw. I would be courious to see if the rumor is that if you breed a EIC carrier to a EIC clear, you should have puppys that are EIC clear.
 

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I just recently had my litter of eight tested. Clear sire to carrier bitch. Sent dew claws to U of MN (the only place IMO), $65 per pup, no 'litter' discount. I have four carriers and four clears. My pups are sold for the same amount. Being a carrier is not a health issue. Being a carrier does not affect the dogs talents or abilities.
 
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I would be courious to see if the rumor is that if you breed a EIC carrier to a EIC clear, you should have puppys that are EIC clear.
You may have puppies that are EIC clear. There is a 50/50 chance that each puppy will be clear. How the dice rolls is another story. You could, in theory, end up with all clears or all carriers but it is not likely according to the odds.
 

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University on minnesota is 65 per test no volume discount.
DDC is 58 per test up to 4 or $48 per test if 5 or more submitted.DDC also does 2nd genetic tests on same sample for $20 so if you wanted to test CNM or something else also that might be the cheapest route.
Animal Genetics incorporated offers the EIC test for $45 per dog.
 

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I just recently had my litter of eight tested. Clear sire to carrier bitch. Sent dew claws to U of MN (the only place IMO), $65 per pup, no 'litter' discount. I have four carriers and four clears. My pups are sold for the same amount. Being a carrier is not a health issue. Being a carrier does not affect the dogs talents or abilities.
This is correct. Just had my litter of 8 tested @ $65/ea. I had 7 clear/1 carrier.
 

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You may have puppies that are EIC clear. There is a 50/50 chance that each puppy will be clear. How the dice rolls is another story. You could, in theory, end up with all clears or all carriers but it is not likely according to the odds.
You are such a sweet girl Felonie.:confused:
 

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It is the breeders choice whether to test all pups, some pups, or no pups. Some breeders do, Some breeders don't. A few breeders will do the test but require that the buyer pay the cost (akin to color testing). A breeder is obligated to produce healthy puppies, clear/carrier both are healthy puppies. EIC status only comes into play when/if client plans to breed, the vast majority of dog owners do not breed, and the status can easily, be bred around. Much easier than hips, elbow, temperament, lack of talent, etc. JMO it seems a tad ludicrous to paint one individual as inferior for a single gene mutation, when the pup might be the most talented in the litter. To me, It seems like that is what breeders do when they post EIC results on pups, or charge less for one or another. Clear is nice, but I like color (Blue, Orange, Camo, etc.)
 

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I believe U fMN originated the test and charges $65 per pup, no volume discount and requires vet certification on dew claws, blood samples or cheek swabs.
DDC ([email protected]) offers a volume discount and provides a cheek swab kit. They charge $58 per test up to 4 animals, or $48 per testing on 5 animals or more (i.e., testing a litter). They also also offer to provide results for a 2nd genetic test on the same sample for an additional $20 per test, so if you wanted to test for CNM or DNA ID, etc., this is less expensive than U of MN but does not register the individual dog w/OFA. UofMN also provides VPI (verified permanent identification) level registration, which requires a permanent ID (chip, tatoo, etc.) that must be verified and signed off by the attending veterinarian on the submission form.
Breeding clear-to-carrier offers a 50/50% chance of producing carrier pups, but will not produce any affected animals. Morally, I've asked many vets, breeders, and UofMN lab personnel and all have said that the EIC gene is so wide-spread across Field Labs that to NOT breed carriers would eliminate so many great dogs that it would be destructive to the current gene pool. Not to breed a great [carrier] dog seems a waste.
Good breeders do the homework before breeding and continue to produce great dogs.
 

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I believe U fMN originated the test and charges $65 per pup, no volume discount and requires vet certification on dew claws, blood samples or cheek swabs.
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Where are you reading it reqiuires vet certification for dew claws blood samples or cheek swabs? It does not. You can do the dews yourself and send them in. They just require a vet for VPI. Most dews are done for preliminary identification and the buyers should follow up with a an official vet certified one if they want. Iknow I would and I would also use U of M because there have been errors when done elsewhere.

The bottom line is unless you have a really top notch breeding with an an advanced title such as an FC female and want to identify carriers and price them differently than clears, it is not worth the extra expense. The general public continues to have difficulty understanding that a carrier is a healthy dog and not a lesser defective dog, and most of them never intend to breed anyway, so IMHO it is not necessary to identify the status of the litter as long as they will never have the condition. Many of us sell them on limited registration and explain why to the buyers before they buy that the test is needed along with hips eyes elbows and CNM before they breed and to convert the limited registration to a full to breed. So far I have had only one buyer do the conversion, and she said she intended to from the beginning. Her female tested clear but she will sell her pups on limited also. It serves to educate the buyers before they decide to breed just because they can. I am approached by so many people for stud service who want to produce puppies with no certs or only hips who I of course refuse.
 
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