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OK - well I have read your 10 posts to date and am thoroughly confused about what you're doing. Good luck.
 

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Jessicakay,

I don't know if this is universal, but I use the term English Lab to denote Labs from the UK with show backgrounds and British Lab to denote Labs from the UK with field backgrounds. I'm sure people have used Labs from both genepools in the field. I prefer to hunt with Labs from British field bloodlines to Labs from English show bloodlines.

Swack
 

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Isn't the proper terminology in most of these cases, bench (English) and field (American)? Of course there are English born labs, but people use the term for dogs with a show focus. Being new to this, this seems to be the case in my experience.
 

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Actually, bench is bench and field is field. There are "American" bench dogs and "American" field dogs. There are "British" bench dogs, and "British" field dogs. Typically, in the US, "English" is slang for any bench dog from either side of the pond, and "British" indicates a field bred dog from lines recently imported from the UK. Its a lot easier IMHO just to say "bench" and "field."
 

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Actually, bench is bench and field is field. There are "American" bench dogs and "American" field dogs. There are "British" bench dogs, and "British" field dogs. Typically, in the US, "English" is slang for any bench dog from either side of the pond, and "British" indicates a field bred dog from lines recently imported from the UK. Its a lot easier IMHO just to say "bench" and "field."
Agreed!

In the USA when breeders use the term "English line lab" I think they nearly always mean the bench/show lines. But over here when the term "British lab" is used, it typically means a hunting/field line of more recent British stock.

But you can always ask the breeder what they mean and to prove the hunting ability of their dogs. People definitely hunt with British field line labs and are very successful at it.

Jennifer
 

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Interested in why you (plural 'you', not directed at any one person) would want a Show Bred dog (from anywhere in the world!) to work in the field?... Surely, it is better to buy one 'bred for the job'?
 

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Interested in why you (plural 'you', not directed at any one person) would want a Show Bred dog (from anywhere in the world!) to work in the field?... Surely, it is better to buy one 'bred for the job'?


HaahahHAHAHahhahahHAHhahahahahHHAhahahahahaha

Don't no body shoot nobody till I get back with popcorn and beer.

Ringside seats regards

Bubba
 

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Sometimes it works out well for the individual. Remember, field bred dogs in the US are often (not always) "hotter" than those bred in your neck of the woods. When I went shopping for my older show line guy, at the time I wanted a dog who would assuredly be calm in the house and be a calm greeter at my busy dog boarding facility. I also wanted a dog I could hunt with on the occasional weekends in the fall. So I got a sporty model show line dog.

A few years later, I decided I needed a "hotter" dog to pursue competition and so bought a field line dog. Luckily I'm able to be with her all day with access to several fields 24/7, so she gets worn out and is calm in the house by the time we get home. There are a lot of responsible show line breeders here who don't create the freak show body styles. There are some who do, but luckily there's a choice.

Jennifer
 

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Interested in why you (plural 'you', not directed at any one person) would want a Show Bred dog (from anywhere in the world!) to work in the field?... Surely, it is better to buy one 'bred for the job'?
You are spot on.
 

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Ah okay, I think US show and working dogs are different to British (English/Scottish/Welsh/Irish?!!!!!) show and working dogs perhaps?! Here, yes a show bred lab might be a bit more ploddy, but they also often don't have much of the working ability left in them, can be obstinate (self pleasing), vocal and generally not up to the job. A MASSIVE generalisation, as there are some which are slightly more 'dual purpose', BUT as far as I know in recent times NOBODY has won a UK FT with a show bred dog. And there are no longer any Dual Champions and haven't been for several decades. In labradors at least, they are virtually separate breeds...
 

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Ah okay, I think US show and working dogs are different to British (English/Scottish/Welsh/Irish?!!!!!) show and working dogs perhaps?! Here, yes a show bred lab might be a bit more ploddy, but they also often don't have much of the working ability left in them, can be obstinate (self pleasing), vocal and generally not up to the job. A MASSIVE generalisation, as there are some which are slightly more 'dual purpose', BUT as far as I know in recent times NOBODY has won a UK FT with a show bred dog. And there are no longer any Dual Champions and haven't been for several decades. In labradors at least, they are virtually separate breeds...
I completely agree with what you have said including no longer duals, separate breeds, and never won an advanced All Age FT stake. That is the majority of opinions on this board of working retrievers. Again, your observations are spot on. Some people just want to do things the hard way to prove a point.
 
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