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Discussion Starter #1
I want some opinions on this. I took a 3 yo BLF for an eye exam for certification. The vet said she had pupillary membranes (can't recall the type) which would cause her to fail certification. He explained her's was not and would not affect her vision, however with the type she has, she could pass it on to pups and it could be a more severe case in some pups causing vision problems. Thus he did not recommend breeding her. He even went over that there are different types of pupillary membranes and some are breeder options, but her type is not.

Well I sent it in to OFA to register on the open database (free for failures) and I got a bill. I called to see why I got a bill- the dog's eyes passed with breeder option. So I'm curious as to why he might have said do not breed her, confusion or difference of opinion from OFA.

Despite selling the dog due to what I thought was failing eyes, I'm not mad. I have learned a lesson though- don't sell until OFA confirms failure.

But I'm curious if some vets' opinions on some eye diseases different from what OFA deems passing and failing.
 

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OFA cannot interpret what is on the form. The doctor had to spell out what type of persistent pupillary membrane she had and then it is classified according to what the veterinary ophthalmologist association has determined. I have never heard of a persistent pupillary membrane being a breeding issue. As I understand things it is just something that didn't totally reabsorb during development and if it is not attached to a critical area of the eye it is not a concern.

Hopefully some of the veterinarians on this list will weigh in.

Meredith
 

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According to OFA site, some PPMs if marked by the ACVO are ineligible and certificate will not be issued

http://www.offa.org/eye_ineligible.html

there are also other eye issues that are breed specific which might pass in one breed but fail in another breed
 

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I always get a second opinion on any diagnosis that is unfavorable because what one ACVO sees and diagnoses may not be the same as another. This happened to us when it was still under CERF, just a different eye condition.
 

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I had my dog's eyes examined when she was a year old and was told something about a membrane. That vet did not say anything about it being hereditary, but CERF/OFFA gave it a code 11. That vet did not dilate her pupils.

I had her eyes re-examined this year, she is 4 now and her eyes were found normal. This vet dilated her eyes, when he told me they where normal I asked about the membrane. I was told that the membrane was probably still there. That with dilating her eyes it wouldn't show up, but it would allow him to see if there were any signs of other hereditary eye diseases. That exam did not go through CERF, it went directly to OFFA.

Both were ACVO registered vets.
 

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Always get a second opinion. I had an veterinary ophthalmologist tell me, "she won't sit still. Looks like folds. I can't give her a number." I went up the road and a more experienced eye vet looked and in about 15 seconds told me there were no folds and followed up with several of his peers to make sure. I also had a vet give me a breeders option code and the CERF folks didn't see it as significant enough to even have a breeders option.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here eyes were dilated. He is an experienced ACVO vet. I'm looking at the application and exam sheet: Right Eye, persistent pupillary membranes, lens pigment foci/no strands is what is marked. No other problems noted. He said that was failing. He also gave me a 2013 ACVO Ocular Disorders Report for Labrador Retrievers. It has a breeding advice column and the only persistent pupillary membrane type that is "breeder option" is iris to iris type- all the rest advise not breeding.
 
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