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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok Here we go I know this has probably been asked alot so if this annoys any I'm sorry I used search and google and akc rule book but did not find out what I'm looking for. I'm just getting started in hunt test and know if I will ever do field trials but might be looking for a pup lout of ft lines and need to know what I'm looking at on pedigrees so here is what I know ( or think I know)
NFC = national field champion
AFC = amateur field champion
FC = field champion
QAA = qualified all age
derby ???
I'm sure I'm missing some. My question is how does a dog acquire these tittles. What is open all age and amateur all age and owner quals derbys etc and also on the ht side of things how do you qualify for master nationals and does that go on the pedigree as well. Just thought it would b helpful down the road to know what all the abbreviations mean when looking for a well bred pup instead of the backyard breeding my current dog is from lol.
Thank you for your time
Jeremy
 

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QAA is not an official title, its more like a designation

and a Derby dog is one that has not reached the age of 2 at the start of the particular trial
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Start here
http://www.akc.org/pdfs/rulebooks/RFTRET.pdf
page 24.

Do the same for the retriever HT rules to get those details.
Thanks that helped a little probably have to read it 20 times to comprehend it
I guess I didn't read far enough down. Alot for my littel brain to absorb. Also How can I get a paper copie of both ht and ft rule books I looked on akc's website but can't see where to order one
 

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Or click "print"?

JS
 

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Do you have to be an AKC member to run in the FT even if you are CKC member?
There's no such thing as being a "member" of the AKC. They are a registry and a club of clubs. You can be a member of an AKC club, (such as the American Chesapeake Club or the Labrador Retriever Club, or a retriever club that puts on AKC hunt tests and/or field trials), but it's not required in order to run events. The dog does have to be AKC-registered though.
 

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You have to have 6 Master passes(even if the dog is already MH) in the year prior to the Master National to qualify. The pup gets a MNH to go on the pedigree.
 

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There is also NAFC National Amatuer Field Champion
And sometimes QAA is shown as *** after the dogs name
Derby List is dogs that got 10 points in Derbys
Master National Qualified is 6 Master passes in the 12 month period or Means they actally passed the Master Ntional
MNH usually means they have Passed the Master National twice or 3 times if it appears on an AKC title.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You have to have 6 Master passes(even if the dog is already MH) in the year prior to the Master National to qualify. The pup gets a MNH to go on the pedigree.
Thank you

Do they have to win or just qualify to get an MNH
As far as choosing a breeding goes is a dog with a MNH better than a MH or dose it mean they just went to more events ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There is also NAFC National Amatuer Field Champion
And sometimes QAA is shown as *** after the dogs name
Derby List is dogs that got 10 points in Derbys
Master National Qualified is 6 Master passes in the 12 month period or Means they actally passed the Master Ntional
MNH usually means they have Passed the Master National twice or 3 times if it appears on an AKC title.
Sorry I had started my post before lunch got busy then ate lunch and finished my post did not see your reply before I hit submit. Thank you you ansewerd my ?
 

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Thank you

Do they have to win or just qualify to get an MNH
As far as choosing a breeding goes is a dog with a MNH better than a MH or dose it mean they just went to more events ?
MNH is a hunt test deal. There is no winning in a hunt test. You pass/qualify or you fail. What is a pass vs. fail is up to the judges but the rule book and score sheet tells you whatthe judges are supposed to test for and evaluate.

There are winners and placements in field trials.

As far a choosing a breeding, you should not choose a breeding based soley on titles. Ideally you, or someone who's judgment you trust needs to have seen the dam and sire both at work and at play. Temperment is important. Maybe that high flying FC/AFC is too much dog for a first timer. Also good to see if the dog has produced quality (healthy, good temperment, quiet and clean in the kennel, trainable) pups in the past.

For hunt test titles, every MNH by rule must be a MH first. There are countless MHs that, for what ever reason, did not obtain MNH. This doesn't mean that a particular MH is not a better dog or won't produce better pups than a particular MNH. The same can be said of any title.

For FT dogs, the FC and AFC titles require a win and other placements. The percentage of dogs that set out to obtain FC/AFC and actually get it is very, very small (low single digits I'd guess). The NFC and NAFC titles require that the dog qualify to run either a National Open or National Amatuer and you win it. To further complicate things, there are high point open, high point amatuer, and high point derby awards given each year. And then there are total career All Age point totals to consider.

So what's best breeding... An NFC/AFC with 60 total ALL Age points? An FC/AFC that was also two time high point open dog with 100 AA points? Or maybe a Qualified All Age dog with no title, but has produced multiple FC/AFCs, High Point Dogs, and a National Winner or two?
 
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