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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I met some folks that only run field trials a while back. Eventually a rain shower put us in the truck for a little while and as we waited it out the subject of the HRC came up. One readily admitted they had ran a few AKC Hunt Test but never seen an HRC test before. It was rather interesting and pretty eye opening to hear their perception of what an HRC finished test consisted of. A thread I was reading this morning that SouthBryanLabs started on the HRC message Board reminded me of that conversation.

So my Focus Group Question for folks that either run all AKC Field Trials, AKC Hunt Tests, or occasionally run an HRC Test but DO NOT consider themselves HRC Regulars or Members- What is your perception for the HRC Program including their regular Hunt Tests and the Grand? Thanks in advance.
 

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I started out in HRC and had to switch to AKC hunt tests when I moved to an area where there were no HRC clubs. At first I did not like AKC but it was just not what I was used to and over time I adapted. I found the HRC tests very similar to AKC in comparable levels but feel that HRC tries to make it more like a hunting situation. The whole wear camo thing in HRC while AKC handlers dress like Ninjas. ;-). Set ups were very similar but I thought AKC master was a little longer and sometimes more technical than HRC finished. When running HRC I always kept a set of waders in the truck and needed them often. They always used lots of decoys and I ran out of a boat, a blind and off a platform in the water and then there was the whole handling and shooting the gun thing in HRC that AKC does not have. I've never seen an AKC test where I needed waders and most judges just throw out a few decoys if any. Never run out of a boat either. No live flyers in HRC and I like that aspect of the AKC tests. Then there are the call backs in AKC but in HRC if you pay your fee you get to pick up all the birds even if you don't pass which I liked. The two organizations just have a different philosophy about their tests and I enjoy both of them. I just stick with AKC now because that is what is readily available and I like to qualify my dog for the Master National if I can so I have to stick with one organization. I am also starting to mess with the FT game which is AKC.
 

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I started out in HRC and am still a member of a local club but not active and rarely run an HRC test anymore since I've started running feld trials.

I have tremendous respect for the HRC hunt test game. Just as with AKC hunt tests, the test on a given weekend can vary greatly in difficulty. It depends on the judges, the grounds, size of field, etc. I will say that I've run a couple of series in AKC Master tests that were an absolute joke. A double in the third series that would be a very easy Senior double and have run Master land blinds at 40 yards with zero factors. I've never run an HRC finished test even approaching that level of ease. Many folks I know that run both AKC and HRC hunt tests run Started, Junior, Seasoned, Senior, Finished, Master because they feel the level of difficulty goes in this order. I haven't run a whole lot of hunt tests, and have run more HRC than AKC, but I don't really see a significant difference in difficulty between AKC and HRC at comparable levels. I think its more a function of the judges than the rules and requirements of the tests.

With regard to the Grand, and I've never run one and only watched one...
from the stories I've heard from both judges and handlers, the standard for line manners for both the dog and handler is so different between the Grand and a weekend finsihed test that a large number of dogs that get a Finished title rather easily, can not get through a Grand. From what I get from the stories, I'd think the weekend hunt test standard should probably be tightened, and the Grand standard maybe relaxed a bit. Bottom line of the Grand is that a smaller percentage of dogs pass the Grand than pass the Master National (these statistics were, like most, made up on the spot).
 

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Glen,
I am unsure about the pass rate at the Master National but can speak to the pass rate at the Grand. It seems to be that the pass rate hovers somewhere in the 15 -20% range however, of approximately 5,000 HRCH titles awarded since HRC's inception in 1984 there are only about 520 GRHRCH titles. That says only about 10% of ALL HRCH dogs ever attain the title! The Grand standard, while unspoken, is SIGNIFICANTLY higher than that of a weekend test.

I started out in HRC and am still a member of a local club but not active and rarely run an HRC test anymore since I've started running feld trials.

I have tremendous respect for the HRC hunt test game. Just as with AKC hunt tests, the test on a given weekend can vary greatly in difficulty. It depends on the judges, the grounds, size of field, etc. I will say that I've run a couple of series in AKC Master tests that were an absolute joke. A double in the third series that would be a very easy Senior double and have run Master land blinds at 40 yards with zero factors. I've never run an HRC finished test even approaching that level of ease. Many folks I know that run both AKC and HRC hunt tests run Started, Junior, Seasoned, Senior, Finished, Master because they feel the level of difficulty goes in this order. I haven't run a whole lot of hunt tests, and have run more HRC than AKC, but I don't really see a significant difference in difficulty between AKC and HRC at comparable levels. I think its more a function of the judges than the rules and requirements of the tests.

With regard to the Grand, and I've never run one and only watched one...
from the stories I've heard from both judges and handlers, the standard for line manners for both the dog and handler is so different between the Grand and a weekend finsihed test that a large number of dogs that get a Finished title rather easily, can not get through a Grand. From what I get from the stories, I'd think the weekend hunt test standard should probably be tightened, and the Grand standard maybe relaxed a bit. Bottom line of the Grand is that a smaller percentage of dogs pass the Grand than pass the Master National (these statistics were, like most, made up on the spot).
 

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Never saw a HRC test till the one I was Hunt Secretary for. We formed a club contacted HRC filled out paperwork, got a ton of help from different states because we were the first club formed in California. Found out we could shoot fliers in Seasoned and Finished and elected to shoot them only in Finished for our first weekend. I ran 2 dogs one in Started and one in Seasoned both days. Liked the setups liked the entry rules (day of, changing levels,etc) like that Finished is done in one day so you get two tests a weekend. like that the dogs should follow the gun barrel, like the line manners requirements. And I find that shooting the gun gives me something else to do instead of screwing up my dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies so far guys. Good responces. It's always interesting to me to find out what conclusions people have about something with a limited knowledge. For Example- My mother-in-law is convinced that Hooter's is a joint where the waitresses in skimpy outfits rub their boobs all over you and give lap dances while serving you beer and chicken wings. She's never been to one but believes that whole heartedly.
 

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I don't understand what you mean by the "HRC Program". I think you are asking for opinions on their hunt tests and the Grand but what exactly is the program part?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't understand what you mean by the "HRC Program". I think you are asking for opinions on their hunt tests and the Grand but what exactly is the program part?
Well, for example, around this region of the country we have several really active clubs that have monthly training days. They actively recruit the duck hunters and the one/ two dog amateurs to come and train and better their dogs. Tailgate dinner ribbon ceremonies are a big part of the weekend, not just the test itself. That is what I would consider the program.
 

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At an HRC test, everyone looks like the Duck Commander in full camo and face paint, the scheme of which they completely change completely between each series. They spend most of their time badmouthing AKC and NAHRA and talking about how what they do is exactly like hunting and that no other dogs could ever hunt besides HRC dogs. Passes are determined based on how well the handler dresses, rubs their stomachs and pats their heads while standing up in a canoe and how loud they yell 'safe' after spitting the popper out of the shotgun. What the dog does is irrelevant. If the handler passes muster, a ribbon as gaudy as the flowers at a mafia boss' funeral is handed out.

The grand is a big HRC test held every other weekend and is open to every dog belonging to a handler who has passed a started test at least once in the handler's lifetime. It is similar to a regular test except that extra points are given for wearing camo by Avery or other sponsors. To make it even more exactly like hunting, all handlers are required to attend a bitch check at 3:30 every morning. The biggest difference is that the dog is actually judged. If it moves a whisker, it is dropped. If not, it is awarded the Grand Master of Ceremonies Real Hunter Not Crappy FT Dog Champion title (GMCRHNCFTDCh)

Did I get it right? :)
 

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Thanks for the replies so far guys. Good responces. It's always interesting to me to find out what conclusions people have about something with a limited knowledge. For Example- My mother-in-law is convinced that Hooter's is a joint where the waitresses in skimpy outfits rub their boobs all over you and give lap dances while serving you beer and chicken wings. She's never been to one but believes that whole heartedly.
That's the way they work around here.:cool:
 

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Sounds like a guy that didn't pass...lol.
 

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At an HRC test, everyone looks like the Duck Commander in full camo and face paint, the scheme of which they completely change completely between each series. They spend most of their time badmouthing AKC and NAHRA and talking about how what they do is exactly like hunting and that no other dogs could ever hunt besides HRC dogs. Passes are determined based on how well the handler dresses, rubs their stomachs and pats their heads while standing up in a canoe and how loud they yell 'safe' after spitting the popper out of the shotgun. What the dog does is irrelevant. If the handler passes muster, a ribbon as gaudy as the flowers at a mafia boss' funeral is handed out.

The grand is a big HRC test held every other weekend and is open to every dog belonging to a handler who has passed a started test at least once in the handler's lifetime. It is similar to a regular test except that extra points are given for wearing camo by Avery or other sponsors. To make it even more exactly like hunting, all handlers are required to attend a bitch check at 3:30 every morning. The biggest difference is that the dog is actually judged. If it moves a whisker, it is dropped. If not, it is awarded the Grand Master of Ceremonies Real Hunter Not Crappy FT Dog Champion title (GMCRHNCFTDCh)

Did I get it right? :)
Hope this is tongue in cheek. Otherwise I'd just say "Dog to the line".
 

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At an HRC test, everyone looks like the Duck Commander in full camo and face paint, the scheme of which they completely change completely between each series. They spend most of their time badmouthing AKC and NAHRA and talking about how what they do is exactly like hunting and that no other dogs could ever hunt besides HRC dogs. Passes are determined based on how well the handler dresses, rubs their stomachs and pats their heads while standing up in a canoe and how loud they yell 'safe' after spitting the popper out of the shotgun. What the dog does is irrelevant. If the handler passes muster, a ribbon as gaudy as the flowers at a mafia boss' funeral is handed out.

The grand is a big HRC test held every other weekend and is open to every dog belonging to a handler who has passed a started test at least once in the handler's lifetime. It is similar to a regular test except that extra points are given for wearing camo by Avery or other sponsors. To make it even more exactly like hunting, all handlers are required to attend a bitch check at 3:30 every morning. The biggest difference is that the dog is actually judged. If it moves a whisker, it is dropped. If not, it is awarded the Grand Master of Ceremonies Real Hunter Not Crappy FT Dog Champion title (GMCRHNCFTDCh)

Did I get it right? :)

I too hope this is a joke saw the smiling face so assuming...but you know what they say about asumming.
 

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At an HRC test, everyone looks like the Duck Commander in full camo and face paint, the scheme of which they completely change completely between each series. They spend most of their time badmouthing AKC and NAHRA and talking about how what they do is exactly like hunting and that no other dogs could ever hunt besides HRC dogs. Passes are determined based on how well the handler dresses, rubs their stomachs and pats their heads while standing up in a canoe and how loud they yell 'safe' after spitting the popper out of the shotgun. What the dog does is irrelevant. If the handler passes muster, a ribbon as gaudy as the flowers at a mafia boss' funeral is handed out.

The grand is a big HRC test held every other weekend and is open to every dog belonging to a handler who has passed a started test at least once in the handler's lifetime. It is similar to a regular test except that extra points are given for wearing camo by Avery or other sponsors. To make it even more exactly like hunting, all handlers are required to attend a bitch check at 3:30 every morning. The biggest difference is that the dog is actually judged. If it moves a whisker, it is dropped. If not, it is awarded the Grand Master of Ceremonies Real Hunter Not Crappy FT Dog Champion title (GMCRHNCFTDCh)

Did I get it right? :)
Joke or not, that's funny; I don't care who you are.
 

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At an HRC test, everyone looks like the Duck Commander in full camo and face paint, the scheme of which they completely change completely between each series. They spend most of their time badmouthing AKC and NAHRA and talking about how what they do is exactly like hunting and that no other dogs could ever hunt besides HRC dogs. Passes are determined based on how well the handler dresses, rubs their stomachs and pats their heads while standing up in a canoe and how loud they yell 'safe' after spitting the popper out of the shotgun. What the dog does is irrelevant. If the handler passes muster, a ribbon as gaudy as the flowers at a mafia boss' funeral is handed out.

The grand is a big HRC test held every other weekend and is open to every dog belonging to a handler who has passed a started test at least once in the handler's lifetime. It is similar to a regular test except that extra points are given for wearing camo by Avery or other sponsors. To make it even more exactly like hunting, all handlers are required to attend a bitch check at 3:30 every morning. The biggest difference is that the dog is actually judged. If it moves a whisker, it is dropped. If not, it is awarded the Grand Master of Ceremonies Real Hunter Not Crappy FT Dog Champion title (GMCRHNCFTDCh)

Did I get it right? :)
This is exactly why I quit running, any kind of test and have no desire to run FT. People have become so full of themselves, that one test is better than another and if you don't run FT you aint nothing.
People have started ruining this sport and it shows in a lot of the comments I read on here.
What ever happened to the people that just love training dogs whether they run tests or not.
As far as tests go, they all have their ups and downs. I'm going to be running tests this year just to give my dog something to do in the off season. If the dog titles great if not no big deal. I know my dogs abilities and that's all that matters to me and I don't need a ribbon to tell me that.
 
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