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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks,

I've got that empty in the stomach feeling after using my dog as a test dog at a weekend hunt test. To keep this short and sweet this dog should be running a level above where she is now based on SH training when the collar is around her neck. Collar comes off and I wouldn't trust her in a JH test let alone finishing her SH and moving on... What I saw this weekend makes me think we won't even run this year. Definitely a case of collar wise/test wise. Never been in this position. I'll talk to some local pro's but it is not doing me any good just thinking about it. Hate to give up on her as such a gifted marker, runs great straight lines, hard charging style, handles well, and a wonderful disposition. Tons of potential, but a total SH** during game days. Blows off whistles and cast refusals mainly.

Before I have a cocktails tonight and grab the heeling stick throw it at me, please.
 

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All I'll say is I don't really believe in "collar-wise." Your dog is probably "test-wise." Try going to a training day or go train with a pro when several clients are out. Recreate the test atmosphere and maintain the same standards you do in training. There's no reason to give up on the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've done it, not the amount of distractions going on as you would find on a weekend of course and she is ok. But then again she knows I'll correct with the stick. Gotta find a way to replicate the real deal and get those competitive juices turned on so I can get these points across.
 

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Charles C. said:
All I'll say is I don't really believe in "collar-wise."
I have a big boy that likes to bark at the other dogs when I let him out. If I put the collar on him, he doesn't make a peep.

Believe -- "collar-wise" exists. :wink:
 

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AmiableLabs said:
Charles C. said:
All I'll say is I don't really believe in "collar-wise."
I have a big boy that likes to bark at the other dogs when I let him out. If I put the collar on him, he doesn't make a peep.

Believe -- "collar-wise" exists. :wink:
I don't like bark collars for that very reason. I think there is such a thing as being collar-wise, but I think it's fairly rare.
 

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I doubt you'll find many trainers believe "collar-wise" and "test-wise" to be mutually exclusive.

BUT HEY....sounds like fodder for another poll, Kevin.

UB
 
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Charles C. said:
AmiableLabs said:
Charles C. said:
All I'll say is I don't really believe in "collar-wise."
I have a big boy that likes to bark at the other dogs when I let him out. If I put the collar on him, he doesn't make a peep.

Believe -- "collar-wise" exists. :wink:
I don't like bark collars for that very reason. I think there is such a thing as being collar-wise, but I think it's fairly rare.
I don't like them either... Nothing more meaningful than a hands on correction even if it takes a lot of effort on your part (going outside in the middle of dinner or the night to make a correction, i.e.).

As far as Robert's dilemma... Take a LONG break from tests, even though it's frustrating. It could be test-wise, could be collar-wise, could be both. Both are very bad... And if you get it fixed, you'll need to stay on top of it within a millimeter... And run tests 3-4 weeks apart (no back to backs). But take the rest of the spring/summer off, train, train, train. Require a high degree of accountaiblity on her part, always have the collar on when training, and I'd keep it on randomly in the rest of her life so there's no clear signal about what the collar means.

You CAN do it, it just takes a LOT of patience, consistency and WAITING -- which is the hardest part. If you keep running tests, it will only get worse. I have one that I ran this weekend after a not-long-enough break and I was really disappointed. Some dogs are just SO high. and they'll have problems all their lives, but you can keep them in check enough to get through the tests if you carefully manage it...

-K
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Some dogs are just SO high
- - Groaning on this end...tell me about it. I really though the recent signs of maturity would help this to some small degree. But I hear you guys loud and clear. Thanks.

We missed you this weekend Bill. Hope the leg is on the mend.
 

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Robert said:
Folks,
Collar comes off and I wouldn't trust her... Definitely a case of collar wise/test wise.... Blows off whistles and cast refusals mainly.
.
Go back to short drill type handling situations first with collar on but don't use it, make your corrections "in person". Then remove the collar and still make our corrections in the same manner.
Dogs were taught to handle before collars. It takes longer and more energy is expended but it can work. Like many things in training there are alternative methods to the same end. The collar wise dog needs to learn that you not the collar maintains the control.

Tim
 

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Charles C. said:
AmiableLabs said:
Charles C. said:
All I'll say is I don't really believe in "collar-wise."
I have a big boy that likes to bark at the other dogs when I let him out. If I put the collar on him, he doesn't make a peep.

Believe -- "collar-wise" exists. :wink:
I don't like bark collars for that very reason. I think there is such a thing as being collar-wise, but I think it's fairly rare.
It is not an anti-bark collar. It is my regular old TT Pro500.

He knows when he has it on. Plain and simple. He also knows what a transmitter looks like and apparently what it can do.

(We bred and sold the puppy, he was pro trained, and we got him back as an adult. We believe the pro was too hard on him with a collar.)
 

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There is such things as collar wise dogs!

If I could JUST run tests with a collar on my beast, She would be impressive!!

I agree that it does help to not run alot of tests in a row. The quicker in succession I run them with my Bailey the more the problems rear their ugly head.

I try and attend as many training days as I can that has a good group of people, and get in good corrections to a stiff standard. Then I MAY sneak in a test when she least expects it!
It has helped, but not perfect by any means!

Gooser
 

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