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OK Everybody, heres the deal. 2 yr. YL is solid as a rock on all handling drills- single T, double T,wagonwhell,cheating drills, all/any drills that pertain to handling. we've done them all hundreds of times. THE PROBLEM: lately, it seems as if he thinks out past around 75-100yds that he doesn't have to do what's commanded of him. In other words, he,s solid at whistle sitting out in field but, has started to do what seems to be flat out refusals as in going back instead of over or vice/versa or just kind of doing i guess what he thinks is the right move. the dog is a heck of a hunter. and is being trained at master level training. which he typically has good success with. Is this a common bridge to cross? as i have read before that when some retreivers get "comfortable" with their handling they will sometimes fall off course with things. If so ,ANY advice? thanks so much!!!!
 

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I my own humble opinion, what has worked for me is that I started to follow the dog out during those blinds. Boy was he surprised that I was that close to him. He just never knew when I would be there. It has even worked with new girl.

Mary Beth
 

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there are a lot more experienced trainers/handlers than me but this is what I do. During training I usually give my dog one chance on a cast refusal. If I give an over and she takes a back it is an immediate whistle. I'll repeat the cast--if it is another refusal then she gets a tweet-nick-tweet. Wait a few seconds and give the cast again. Usually only one correction will clean up the cast--occasionally two. This should be a dog though that thoroughly understands what you want. If you are still training cold blinds then walking out and using attrition is a better option.

best of luck
todd
 
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Did you do the drills you mentioned in sequence, one to the next? That's first question...

Go to http://www.totalretriever.com/flowchart.htm

Part of having control at distance is building one thing to the next, one piece at a time. Early blinds should be long, just like the pattern blinds we would run according to Mike Lardy's flowchart above... Pattern blinds would normally be 150-200 yards each, and are TAUGHT piece by piece so dog learns control at distance little by little...

My FIRST guesses would be that you may have never run consistently things that are that long? I never run "short" blinds with young dogs. I know some people have the theory of starting out on short blinds and building up. But I start and stay long, beginning with those pattern blinds. Then you build the anticipation that, regardless of distance, the dog must remain under control.

Following the dog out to HELP is a SUPER idea. I would avoid pressure like the plague with a young dog unless you KNOW he UNDERSTANDS what you're asking and you're only enforcing go, stop and come. A correction for a sit whistle isn't a bad thing, but it should be used only when the dog knows to sit on a whistle as you've taught him... If you've only done short blinds, you need to start running longer, following him out, help him first by blowing a second whistle... Then a few sessions later, as he comes to understand to sit regardless, you maybe can use a correction. Just be careful where you choose to use one so you don't ruin his attitude on blinds. Don't get me wrong, I'm not against correction. I'm just against giving that option as a first course of action with a young dog involved in an internet discussion...

-K
 

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If your dog is breaking up on blinds at the 100 yd range, I don't think your training at the master level just yet. Move up on the dog to keep control. Run many looooong blinds around the 200-300 yd range so you can work on your control and casting. When your getting good casting at that range and your still back at the line I'd say your on your way. Blinds are all about practice and lots of it.

Angie
 

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You have never seen me handle a dog or you'd question my giving you advice, :oops: but...

..aside from the great advice i.e.given:-walking up, only correcting for missed sits, etc.-are you 100% you're being seen? I'm not trying to make excuses for the dog, but handling in white or at least a color that contrasts your background is key. Also-being slow & deliberate when casting & having clear casts. And.. ...don't expect the same finite results that you get on drills yet. i.e-literal casts come w/ time, so don't be afraid to give an angle back the second time & step into it when that first straight back wasn't taken.

Again-I'm just now running cold blinds w/ my new dog & these are things I'm trying to do because I think I expected perfection too soon from my first dog & really messed things up.

Also-don't deny your dog the confidence it gets from running pattern blinds. You need casting drills & cold blinds, but taking a straight line to the bird running 100 miles an hour is a good thing too!

M
 
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