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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thought this would be a good one to discuss. I have one that Mark Smith, after going out in an Open with Buster, says" You don't send HIM on a blind.....you release him !! " He is very hard to thread a needle through a tight keyhole because he kicks dirt up on the casts. Those second and third series Opens are kicking his butt. Oh, Cosmo son,repeat of Ali.
 

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I'm probably all wet because I'm still a newbie, but a lot of the blinds I've seen seem much more suited to slow dogs that's for sure. I have one that comes back from blinds with the hair up in his back from excitement. I don't look forward to crashing and burning on all-age blinds with him.
 

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Probably in the minority of opinions, but asking any dog to hit a keyhole at a distance is like asking a golfer to hit the flag from the fairway, now asking the dog to make an angled water entry just a few yards off the pad seems reasonable
 

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I have a dog like that as well. If you wait to make your cast through the keyhole when the dog is right close to it, he'll flair the cover because it's easier to run around when their back is against the cover rather than turn super tight to go through it. Make your cast a lot earlier and teach the dog to carry the line through the keyhole rather than wait until they on top of the factor and hope they turn tight enough to get through. One thing that might work is to instead of battling that out in the field, go back to the yard and teach some key hole no/no drills. Just like running over or challenging objects in their path, teach the dog to split tall or seek out keyholes.
 

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Fast dogs need handlers with good reflexes and anticipatory skills, I ran one and as the handler you must be on your toes, just because they are fast doesn't mean they should not be under control.
 

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Fast dogs need handlers with good reflexes and anticipatory skills, I ran one and as the handler you must be on your toes, just because they are fast doesn't mean they should not be under control.
I'd also add, that it helps greatly if they will take a cast, especially a tight back cast! When they overcast it's a killer!!
 

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I've only run a few AA land blinds in trials so don't have much perspective but...

Blind #1- Line to blind is between hay bales 100 yards from line. Hay bales probably 7-10 yards apart. Didn't see this as a real problem.

Blind #2- Line to blind is tight to a thick hedge row on one side and basically open pasture on the other side. There is a small bush on the open side that most handlers believe you should be inside of. Hedge row starts 40 yards from line and continues for about 60 yards or so then it opens beyond hedge row. About 15 yards past of, but in line with the hedge row is a single tree, then more or less open for another 40 yards or so to the blind. I heard one handler say that you need to leave hair on the tree. Wind was blowing toward the hedge row. I tried to play it a bit safe and stop my dogs before they wrapped around the end of the hedge row. Went down in flames.

Blind #1 is simolar to those I have run in training. I will train on tighter blinds in the future.
 

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The high rollers are fun to watch, hard to handle.

I prefer a dog that the runs at a moderate speed, to one that runs at warp speed.
 

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The high rollers are fun to watch, hard to handle.

I prefer a dog that the runs at a moderate speed, to one that runs at warp speed.
No kidding... If only more amateurs would listen to this wisdom. They all want the "wild man"...

Be careful what you ask for....:cool:

Angie
 

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The high rollers are fun to watch, hard to handle.

I prefer a dog that the runs at a moderate speed, to one that runs at warp speed.
Very true. I have learned to like the methodical, thinking dogs. I love watching them self correct and get the picture while enroute.
 

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A couple of observations

1) Have your diaphragm "loaded", so you are ready to hit the whistle immediately.

2) It really helps to have a dog that consistently turns the same way.

3) With the faster dogs, you really have to anticipate. By the time you blow, the sound carries out there, you could be dealing with several extra strides that could spell your doom.
 

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Angie - not all of us amateurs want wild men (or wild women). I really do prefer the moderate dog that loves the work, but doesn't charge out like their tail is on fire. It makes blinds much easier on the handler. As you get older you have less breath, slower reflexes and your brain does not engage as fast either.

Dawn
 

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Angie - not all of us amateurs want wild men (or wild women). I really do prefer the moderate dog that loves the work, but doesn't charge out like their tail is on fire. It makes blinds much easier on the handler. As you get older you have less breath, slower reflexes and your brain does not engage as fast either.

Dawn
Amen!!! Age really has no relevance.. It's competency for the task at hand..

Angie
 

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But, but, but!!!! You have what you have. It has taken me how many years to figure out my best bud is too much for me? Anyway, I am enjoying the thread and taking a lot of advice from it. Indy now handles pretty well till he just goes plain ape [email protected] But I am still not fast enough if we get off a little before a keyhole. Had a great day yesterday, put him into a little tiny pond at about 300 yards and got the blind on the far side. Fun, fun, fun!
 

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There is nothing more pleasing to the eye than a fasssssst dog on a straight line to the bird.

john
 

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As long as they are biddable and not quirky, I enjoy some giddy-up.
 

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The test that you are speaking about I feel is the most difficult test in today's field trials if you prefer stylish dogs. I have one that you are talking about as most do these days, sign of the times I guess. Momentum is the enemy, pick 3 or 4 spots to stop the dog no matter how tight to the true line they are, if they gain any momentum getting them through the key hole is kind of a "hell Mary" cast.
 

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Jay:
I remember judging that dog when it was young and a drag racer.

I used to judge key holes as a mandatory situation. After more experience and realizing that too many of the racers were being dropped, I have changed my judging evaluations. I want to encourage the stylish and quick dogs.

You better give a good try at the key hole, but I'm not going to drop you if the tree is missed.
 

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The high rollers are fun to watch, hard to handle.

I prefer a dog that the runs at a moderate speed, to one that runs at warp speed.
After casting my dog away from a poison bird enroute to the blind plus not having the whistle in my mouth and finally stopping her oh, say maybe 40 - 50 yds offline, Ted mentioned to me she took off like a scalded cat, so true..............

I'd also add, that it helps greatly if they will take a cast, especially a tight back cast! When they overcast it's a killer!!
absolutely, oops, I'm late already, nope late again, damn late again.
 

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After more experience and realizing that too many of the racers were being dropped, I have changed my judging evaluations. I want to encourage the stylish and quick dogs.
As it should be. Too many tests the stylish get drop and the trotters without any joy in their job get carried. It's a damn shame. And that doesn't do the dogs justice.
 
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