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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This heat spell sure is hurting my training cycle . My hours at work are 530 a.m to 3 p.m and I refuse to work my dog in 82 degree Temps and high humidity in this texas weather. How do you deal with these high temps?
 

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When I lived in Iowa with high temps and humidity I simply didn't train. Unless you have access to a cool indoor space, it isn't worth it to possibly heat stress your dog. I had access to an obedience training facility so I could go do 3-handed casts, walking fetch, etc. or work on obedience in an air-conditioned space. Otherwise, no training.

Sucks to live in a wicked climate.

Meredith
 

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Many feel your pain and understand exactly the dilemma!
we live in Alabama and S. Georgia. So we can spell hot. So be heat prepared. A 50/50 mixture of rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. That would be applied to the belly, pads and ear area. Get schooled on how to hydrate a dog and your time windows ( I use Elements pre exercise and recovery ).
For the work - up early and in the field at first light. Done by 8. Be careful in the water as that envelope of water is heat they can’t escape from.
now a couple of days a week we train with others and we start at 730 and run 9 dogs and try to done by 10.
Your case with a morning work shift is tough.
do drill work and keep it short.
good luck.
dk
 

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Many feel your pain and understand exactly the dilemma!
we live in Alabama and S. Georgia. So we can spell hot. So be heat prepared. A 50/50 mixture of rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. That would be applied to the belly, pads and ear area. Get schooled on how to hydrate a dog and your time windows ( I use Elements pre exercise and recovery ).
For the work - up early and in the field at first light. Done by 8. Be careful in the water as that envelope of water is heat they can’t escape from.
now a couple of days a week we train with others and we start at 730 and run 9 dogs and try to done by 10.
Your case with a morning work shift is tough.
do drill work and keep it short.
good luck.
dk
excellent advice - training early is key. I try to get training done by 9 am -- it is more humid in the morning, but cooler. All in all I'd rather deal with 3 months of summer weather in MO than 6 months of Alaska winter. LOL

Jesus might be able to do some early training on the weekends or his days off. But that 5:30 am work schedule prevents him from training the other days.
 

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82?? Here in MS it was 82 before daylight several days this week. Will be 98 later today and a heat index of about 110. We train our normal schedule but just scale back what we are doing. Fewer long swims, less multiples especially in tall cover, and watch the condition of each dog very closely. Early and late as best we can, although my group all have full time jobs.
 

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Heat index here at 8:00 AM WAS 91. Actual temp 95 until 7:00 PM. No training ‘round here. Right now its 95 with 108 heat index.
 

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I trained two dogs this morning. Done at 7:20. Three marks and one blind each. I get to training site at 5:45 to 6:00 am.
I have been using BB as I don’t have reload. But I try to work one ZW duck in the setup. Sunrise at 6:20 or so. It’s tough.
Yesterday I trained in one of our development ponds. They are well fed and water is pretty cool.
 
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Ran 3 blinds @100 yards. Worked on taking good initial lines and punching cover. Dog was still fresh so threw one mark @50 yards in a point of cover. Probably 10 minutes of actual training and done before 6:30. Sorry you are working in the AM. Never seems to cool down in the afternoon.
 

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Everyone needs to remember that down here in Texas that we have a high level of humidity and be careful training your dogs .
Humidity takes it out of everyone. Human and dog alike. I just canceled a trip to the retriever academy in OK because the temps are going to be brutal during that time. Upper 90's which means heat index of low 100's. ( I could train in the morning, but running only one set up a day would not be my idea of getting the most out of the trip).
 

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And it’s not even July yet.
 
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In 15 day forecast, 14 day are at 100 or higher. I'm stressed.
 

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You know your training session is going to be short, so define your training goal for the day. Work on the specifics of a problem that you are having. Work in the water In order to keep your dog cool down as much as possible. There’s always something you can do to Either maintain or advance your dog. When I lived in the Sacramento area where the temperatures reached 110° I trained under the trees in the yard. To cool the dogs down After a session I had a horse trough filled with water that they eagerly jumped into on command. Common sense plays a big role when dealing with the heat.
 

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I agree with being very cautious in the heat as mentioned above. I also agree in extreme weather conditions to utilize different time frames available when the weather is more conducive to training. My question is, does anyone intentionally train in the heat of the day to mimic a test day?
 

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I agree with being very cautious in the heat as mentioned above. I also agree in extreme weather conditions to utilize different time frames available when the weather is more conducive to training. My question is, does anyone intentionally train in the heat of the day to mimic a test day?
NO!!!!!!!!!
To paraphrase Mike Lardy, if you were in a **** eating contest would you train for it?
Why intentionallyput your dog at risk of heat stroke?
If you're in a trial and it's dangerously hot you can scratch
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well we went and trained this morning at my trainers property. My younger dog Cinco did OK, Boo did OK, middle thrown left and retired , left bird thrown right and a wipe out bird thrown right to left . We had to call her back in when I sent her to the middle , she responded great . We ended the day on blinds and was very happy with the results ( land blind practice carried over) we ended the day at 1244 and she slept most of the way home.
 

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NO!!!!!!!!!
To paraphrase Mike Lardy, if you were in a **** eating contest would you train for it?
Why intentionallyput your dog at risk of heat stroke?
If you're in a trial and it's dangerously hot you can scratch
I don’t know if Mr. Lardy is the original author, I think I first heard it when he was a lad.
”if you see your name entered in a $hit eating contest don’t practice” author unknown and repeated by me often under just such circumstances 😉
 
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