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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a dog that has been x-rade came back with both in elbows and hips with mild dysplasia, devasted me had really high hopes for this dog. He has so much energy very agile leaper too, came from very good breeding program. Now here the kicker since dog came with a guantee the breeders seem to be give a runaround not wanting to me a replacement puppy. I dont want another dog from the same parents after this, I asked for different puppy now I have been waiting almost 10 months now for a new puppy. ??? is this dog has been getting worse if he gets to much exersise starts limping around legs get real stiff. What can i do for him he sometimes cries he hurt so bad, and should I keep him when the puppy comes or give him back to the breeder?
 

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You really have two issues here:

The first dog and then the replacement puppy.

What you do with the first dog is dictated (or might be) by the contract. If you dog is having issues already, some serious discussions need to be held. Seeing as he is symptomatic already, its really about pain management.

The replacement puppy is the replacement pup. Has the breeder had litters that could provide a replacement pup? If so, I'd discuss with the breeder a timeframe. If not, be patient. Not every breeder always has puppies.

WRL
 

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I would simply ask for a time frame for a new puppy or ask for the return for my money. Some breeders may require that you spay/neuter the dog and then allow you to keep them or may say the only way they will refund money is if you return the dog. the breeder may require that the dog be examined by their vet. did you send in x-rays to OFA to be graded? if not I would. You really have to look at your contract AND know the laws in your state (look them up online). In some cases the laws actually give you better protection and will over ride the contract.
If all else fails it is very easy and cheap to file a small claims court case.
 

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I have a dog that has been x-rade came back with both in elbows and hips with mild dysplasia, devasted me had really high hopes for this dog. He has so much energy very agile leaper too, came from very good breeding program. Now here the kicker since dog came with a guantee the breeders seem to be give a runaround not wanting to me a replacement puppy. I dont want another dog from the same parents after this, I asked for different puppy now I have been waiting almost 10 months now for a new puppy. ??? is this dog has been getting worse if he gets to much exersise starts limping around legs get real stiff. What can i do for him he sometimes cries he hurt so bad, and should I keep him when the puppy comes or give him back to the breeder?
I would have your vet write an informative letter to the breeder about the joint disease. I assume the dog is at least 2 years old. To be clear you are saying that the elbows are not normal and the hips are dysplastic which means this young dog already has arthritic changes to the joints. Your dog is already on the road to arthritis and joint disease so you need to put up road blocks to delay the changes by joint supplements, stretching, and short but frequent walks. As you said your dog is worse after too much exercise which is normal with dogs that have degenerative joint disease. Do short 10 minute walks on leash 4-5 times a day. Your have to keep arthritic dogs moving frequently. Supplements I recommend are Dasuquin with MSM and Adequan. Also If it's severe which it sounds like because he cries out in PAIN which most retrievers are pretty stoic when it comes to pain I would consider stem cell injections. Most importantly you need to control his pain through medications like and NSAID, Tramadol, Gabapentin. Talk to your vet about these things. Also if there is a rehab vet close, you can do laser therapy, water therapy, ect. Further more I am angered to hear what this breeder is doing as far as honoring the contract of a refund or new puppy. They should not be breeding the dogs that produced a puppy that will now have a rough road ahead for the rest of his or her life with lots of Expenses! This is a great example of irresponsible breeding that only hurts the breed. I hope I have been helpful, and feel sorry for your dog and your situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This dog that I have I thought was very good breeding grandpa was riptide star numerous others though I think this is comming from the mothers side. Breeder told that this is first time that they had or heard of a problem in this breeding. I have the option of returning this to the breeder, just that i have grown really attached to him. I fear the worst for him, curbed the training and exercise way down but he is so active that is hard to do. As mentioned in other post I have tried supplments but that don't seem to have any effect. ??? Is swimming to much? I am afraid that here real soon be forced into making a hard decession about him. Yes the results were OFA sent copies to the breeder.
 

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If you've contacted the breeder and they have guaranteed you a pup from an upcoming litter, they are trying to uphold their part of the contract. If it's a smaller breeder, they'll probably only have maybe 1-2 litters a year, If your waiting for a particular match without this or that dog it might take time. Breeders do not breed all the time, a lot of planning goes into it, even setting up the framework can take months-years. Then you got to wait for dog to go into season (6-18mt), and hope the pregnancy takes (2mt. until whelp + 8-12weeks aging). The chosen stud dog has to be accessible (not campaigning), or arrangements have to be made (everything shipped), testing has to be done so the timing is correct. If the female is a campaigning dog, and it's not convenient to breed her, they'll wait. Also the breeder will have ~8 more puppies to place, aside from your replacement pup, they'll want to ensure a market for those pups, perhaps even a list of interested parties prior to the setting up the breeding.

If it worries you contact the breeder and ask for an approximate time period or a refund, (You can always ask ;)), They may not give you one, or may ask you to wait until they sell another pup from a different litter. Still it sounds like the breeder want to work with you and that's half the battle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes this bad situatuion can anybody identify what gene the parents are carring to have dysplasia? Vet told me they do not know the parents had good to excellent hips too. I wanted to post this baised on my experience, not wanting hurt or harm anybody.
 

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Yes this bad situatuion can anybody identify what gene the parents are carring to have dysplasia? Vet told me they do not know the parents had good to excellent hips too. I wanted to post this baised on my experience, not wanting hurt or harm anybody.
I didn't quite understand your wording on this, the vet said the parents had good to excellent hips that are OFA certified? An INSAID is an anti-inflammatory medication. It's like us taking Ibuprofen. Examples of Canine INSAIDS are Rimadyl, Metacam, Deramax, Previcox. They all work the same in relieving inflammation within the joint thus reducing pain. You should notice a difference once he is on an INSAID. Your vet can evaluate him or her and prescribe the appropriate dosage.
 

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Despite some of the comments, having the Sire and Dam hips and elbows OFA'ed as good or excellent does NOT mean any pups will never have a dysplasia issue. It only helps with the odds.

So the parents may be OFA good or excellent, but there is still a chance of throwing a dysplastic pup.

I have seen a lab grow old with hip dysplasia. It sucks! We try to avoid it, but it can happen. You can still love your pup, enjoy, and make it comfortable and happy as possible.

The breeder should honor the gaurantee, I know I would!


Best of luck to you and your pup.
 

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Despite some of the comments, having the Sire and Dam hips and elbows OFA'ed as good or excellent does NOT mean any pups will never have a dysplasia issue. It only helps with the odds.

So the parents may be OFA good or excellent, but there is still a chance of throwing a dysplastic pup.

I have seen a lab grow old with hip dysplasia. It sucks! We try to avoid it, but it can happen. You can still love your pup, enjoy, and make it comfortable and happy as possible.

The breeder should honor the gaurantee, I know I would!


Best of luck to you and your pup.
You are right OFA of the parents does not guarantee the pups will have good or excellent hips but if both parents are good or excellent it should decrease the odds of having hip dysplasia. From how the OP described their dog crying out in pain, Both Elbows and Both Hips are abnormal which tells me that this dog has some severe joint problems at a young age. Which makes me wonder what the parents are like. This is why Penn Hip should become the gold standard for evaluating the Hips instead of OFA where you can breed a good to a good and have pups with bad hips.
 

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good luck with your breeder, I know how this feel's As i am going through, the same thing you are.But it sounds like your dog is worse than mine.I hope everything works out for you.
 

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You are right OFA of the parents does not guarantee the pups will have good or excellent hips but if both parents are good or excellent it should decrease the odds of having hip dysplasia. From how the OP described their dog crying out in pain, Both Elbows and Both Hips are abnormal which tells me that this dog has some severe joint problems at a young age. Which makes me wonder what the parents are like. This is why Penn Hip should become the gold standard for evaluating the Hips instead of OFA where you can breed a good to a good and have pups with bad hips.
I am not familiar with PH, but does this mean that 2 dogs with good PH ratings cannot produce a dog with bad hips? Seems they both rate hips, but in a different way.
 

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I am not familiar with PH, but does this mean that 2 dogs with good PH ratings cannot produce a dog with bad hips? Seems they both rate hips, but in a different way.
If you google Penn Hip they have a web site that explains the process. Bascially with OFA they take an x-ray of the dog's hips in an extended position when doing this they twist the knees inward and really pull the legs tight to make the Ball of the Hip joint fit as snug as it can in the hip socket. Obviously the dog is sedated. But they are trying to get the best possible x-ray.

With Penn Hip they take 3 different x-rays of the hips. They do a hip extended x-ray just like OFA. Then they use a distraction device where they actually measure in millimeters the laxity or the distance the ball of the hip is in relation to the socket it fits into. The last x-ray is a compression view of the hip. They have done studies on Penn hip and you can do it with as young as 16 weeks old and it will be accurate as the dog ages. With OFA you have to wait till the dog is 2 yrs old because that is a good time frame when the bones are done growing. Therefore OFA can underestimate susceptibility to osteoarthritis in dogs which may impede progress in reducing hip dysplasia in the breed.

Penn Hip is a more accurate evaluation. PennHIP's evaluation protocol quantitatively measures passive joint laxity. Based on the degree of laxity, the individual dog is ranked relative to other members of the same breed. This allows breeders to easily identify animals with tighter hips within each breed. Dogs with tighter hips are less likely to develop osteoarthritis (hip dysplasia). Note that the hip evaluation report is not issued in a subjective pass/fail framework.This approach was adopted because some breeds of dogs have few members with hips tight enough to be considered truly DJD non-susceptible. In such breeds, genetic progress can be made (while still maintaining adequate genetic diversity) simply by breeding dogs in the tighter half of the population. Of course, greater selection pressure equates to more rapid genetic change.
 

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What is NSAID?
Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug

Think Meloxicam,Advil, etc.... I have joint issues in my knees and take 2 NSAIDS.....I will say this. If your Pup is already in Pain you MUST try as many solutions as possible to alleviate this or put them down.

I myself have been in tears it hurts so bad and I was MLB on a Division 1 Football Team....Ive had many injuries,surgeries and am very pain tolerant..This Pup doesnt know why it hurts.....Dont worry with a replacement....Help YOUR Dog!!!! He deserves ALL OF YOUR EFFORT RIGHT NOW.

Robert
 

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There are several different surgeries that may help the hips. Hip Denervation, femoral head removal,hip joint replacement. Hip denervation would probably be my first choice for hips if surgery is warented.
 
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