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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just recently started myself as a trainer for my own dogs. i do not want somebody else to do it, i want that bond between me and my Lab. He is 9 months old, can sit, stay, place, laydown, kennel up, retrieve bumpers just fine and we are working on live birds as of this upcoming weekend. Do you think i should be pushing more things for him to do or is he right on track to becoming a good hunting partner ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes i am VERY happy with him. he is doing everything i am asking. I recently had a friend come over with his Yellow lab who is 1 year of age, and she just got back from a 10 week Professional trainging, and my lab does better than his with alot of the basic commands so i am very happy and eager to work him more and more and create one of the best dogs any of my friends have ever seen!! just a great boost of encourgement!
 

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Have you force fetched the dog or plan to? How is your pup's response to the whistle? Is your dog collar conditioned? The reason I ask is 9 months is the most exciting time to train, in my opinion. You can get into some really fun stuff and see results on a daily basis BUT without force fetch and collar conditioning, I believe it is much more difficult to achieve.
 

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It sounds like you are on the right track however what track do you want to be on? Do you plan on ever shooting a bird that your pup may not see? Maybe you should work on running blinds and your pup taking casts and hand signals. If you think you may ever need to do this the best advice I can give is find a program weather it is a book a dvd or working with a trainer and learning from them. I was in your same position not long ago my pup is 16 months now and all I wanted to do was have a good hunting partner and I wanted to train him my self. The short version I read "The Ten Minute Retriever" by John and Amy Dahl and then purchased Total Retriever training by Mike Lardy and Now I am a member of a Training Club. I love working with my dog as much as if not more than I enjoy my hunting. We are now entering Hunt tests and having a great time in the Off season.

But as Fowl Hunter said be sure you are happy dont let anyone talk you into anything you dont want to do however be open minded to new ideas. Welcome to the RTF enjoy your pup and keep up the good work.

BTW their are much more knowledgeable trainers on this site than me but I hope I helped a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I hopefully want him to be able to do sportdog trials and things like that. i always seen them on t.v. and loved watching this amazing dogs work with thier owners. I have a huge passion for trainging dogs now that i am working with mine and hopefully someday be able to start my own dog trainging buisness. But i am still very new to this retriever training. and reading alot of books and watching youtube videos. My book i am on now is "Tom dokkins Retriever trainging". it is a very helpfull book but want to better myself as much as i can so i can pass down my knowledge to my dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I want an all around dog that everybody is jelous of when i take him out. from going to game show's, to walking around town, to just playing with him when people are over. Knowing he has the potential to do so (due to his bloodlines) i am very eager and willing to do whatever it takes to take him all the way to his potential.
 

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Just be careful of getting yourself too full of how your dog is doing. Dogs have a way of "humbling" us as handlers!

Here are two words I have discovered a long time ago NEVER to say to anyone, especially in the retriever world, ...

"Watch this!"

Saying those words will immediately turn your dog into a mindless, untrained, jackwagon that nobody wants to be around!

Have fun!

BHB
 

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Just be careful of getting yourself too full of how your dog is doing. Dogs have a way of "humbling" us as handlers!
Here are two words I have discovered a long time ago NEVER to say to anyone, especially in the retriever world, ... "Watch this!"
BHB
Ha

TOO TRUE!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh very true. i do not want to go out and physically show people how good or not good my dog is lol i just want to be able to go out and do what we love to do and hopefully people will notice the passion we have together and the bond that is there. I am very greatufll for EVERYBODYS comments and tips so please keep them coming. i am very new at this and the more the marrier please!!!

p.s. how exaclty do you teach "force fetching", since my lab does very good at holding it until i reach for it from his mouth, is this a necisarry trait to teach?
 

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Just be careful of getting yourself too full of how your dog is doing. Dogs have a way of "humbling" us as handlers!

Here are two words I have discovered a long time ago NEVER to say to anyone, especially in the retriever world, ...

"Watch this!"

Saying those words will immediately turn your dog into a mindless, untrained, jackwagon that nobody wants to be around!

Have fun!

BHB
very good post!
 

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"force fetching", since my lab does very good at holding it until i reach for it from his mouth, is this a necisarry trait to teach?
It all depends on your goals for the dog. If you've read much here at all you've heard of dogs who are retrieving fand then stop for some reason or other. Here's two recent ones: http://www.retrievertraining.net/forums/showthread.php?t=82007
http://www.retrievertraining.net/forums/showthread.php?t=81711

A good modern retriever training program including force fetch might not cure these types of problems but give you a tool to fix them. Also, force fetch serves as the basis for continued upper level training. I absolutely wouldn't know how to train blinds without force fetch. 'Course, I've been ff'ing my dogs since my first gun dog I got as a puppy in 1983. Truthfully, I wouldn't own a dog who isn't force fetched.
 

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As far as force fetch, run a search on here, and you will find enough to keep you busy for days!!! As for me, yes......in order to achieve maximum potential, I believe it is very necessary....no one will ever convince me otherwise. I could go on and on. I just completed ff with a 10 month old pup....she is a completely different dog (for the good) She is very typical of what you can expect if you do a thorough job of ff...ff is way more than teaching the trained retrieve....there are many, many intangibles as a result.....just do a search here...you will find a bunch!!! By the way, welcome aboard!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Does everybody work every basic command (sit, stay, laydown, place) into each training session or do you start a new trick and thats the only one you practice for a new session?
 

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Does everybody work every basic command (sit, stay, laydown, place) into each training session or do you start a new trick and thats the only one you practice for a new session?
all of those commands with maybe exception of lay down are foundational to all training and drills. getting your dog to sit and stay (though stay isnt in our vocabulary) and place are all part of everything. so to answer your question yes, basic OB is always being taught and worked on EVERY day.
 

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Does everybody work every basic command (sit, stay, laydown, place) into each training session or do you start a new trick and thats the only one you practice for a new session?
I wouldn't so much call them "tricks" as tools. As fun as training is and should be, there is also a bit of work ingrained in training. To me howdy and roll over are tricks, sit here heel and fetch are tools tools that you are learning in your training material tools that should be solid as a rock now and affirmed durring every training session. I learned the hard way because my dog knew sit here and heel however they were not SOLID and I mean solid an later when I wanted to move on to "the fun stuff" marks and casting and what not I found my self going back and having to review the basics. So get in your mind tools not tricks.
 

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Hi,
Sounds like you are having fun and interested in learning more. Have you ever been to a hunt test? If not, there is one in Glencoe MN on 5-12-2012. It is being put on by the Lake Country Retriever Club (www.lcretrieverclub.org). As I recall that is ~ 30 miles from you.

They are free to attend. Where dark clothes (camo is good), bring a chair, bug spray and a picnic lunch. These events happen rain or shine so a raincoat might be a good idea also. Your dog is welcome (unless she's in heat), but must be on a leash. Be sure to bring water for your dog.

I would suggest that you find the headquarters tent and tell them that you are new to hunt tests and would someone please give you an overview. Also ask for any ground rules etc... things that you should not do during a test. I'll bet you find someone that will spend some time with you to explain the basics.

There will be 3 levels of dogs being tested Junior Hunter (JH), Senior Hunter (SH) & Master Hunter (MH). Check out all three!

I think you'll find that this is an addicting sport and you may find yourself saying "wow I wonder if my dog could do that?" Next thing you know you will be a member of a training group and a new journey will begin for you and your dog.

There are many hunt tests in MN and WI throughout the summer. I only suggested Glencoe because its close. You can find more tests at www.EntryExpress.net. You can find hunt test rules at http://www.akc.org/pdfs/rulebooks/RHTRET.pdf

Some of the best advice I got is that dog training is a journey not a sprint.

John Buesgens
 

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Hi,
Sounds like you are having fun and interested in learning more. Have you ever been to a hunt test? If not, there is one in Glencoe MN on 5-12-2012. It is being put on by the Lake Country Retriever Club (www.lcretrieverclub.org). As I recall that is ~ 30 miles from you.

They are free to attend. Where dark clothes (camo is good), bring a chair, bug spray and a picnic lunch. These events happen rain or shine so a raincoat might be a good idea also. Your dog is welcome (unless she's in heat), but must be on a leash. Be sure to bring water for your dog.

I would suggest that you find the headquarters tent and tell them that you are new to hunt tests and would someone please give you an overview. Also ask for any ground rules etc... things that you should not do during a test. I'll bet you find someone that will spend some time with you to explain the basics.

There will be 3 levels of dogs being tested Junior Hunter (JH), Senior Hunter (SH) & Master Hunter (MH). Check out all three!

I think you'll find that this is an addicting sport and you may find yourself saying "wow I wonder if my dog could do that?" Next thing you know you will be a member of a training group and a new journey will begin for you and your dog.

There are many hunt tests in MN and WI throughout the summer. I only suggested Glencoe because its close. You can find more tests at www.EntryExpress.net. You can find hunt test rules at http://www.akc.org/pdfs/rulebooks/RHTRET.pdf

Some of the best advice I got is that dog training is a journey not a sprint.

John Buesgens
Great advice!! This will get you going down the right path faster than anything.
 
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