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Even better maybe their kids will see that being a tradesman is a great way to make a living.

Meredith
yep - there are many trades that are very lucrative, when it comes to salary. Don't have to have get a BS education to find a job - sometimes those degrees mean absolutely less than the paper they are printed on (when it comes to earning a living). Trade schools and careers offer lots of opportunity.

To get back on track... we still have our snow... the dogs are enjoying it, way more than the humans. I feel for the cattle ranchers around here... I don't know much about caring for livestock, but water has got to be an issue for those living in the Ozarks. Or winter calving......Many of the ranches rely on stock ponds that have been frozen over now for a good 4 days. Bull Shoals Reservoir has frozen over too (Theodosia arm) The first time since the early 80's I believe.

Wayne, you get your water back on yet?

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Even better maybe their kids will see that being a tradesman is a great way to make a living.

Meredith
I don't know, they will definitely see that one can make a great living in the trades, but down here, when their dad comes home soaking wet and freezing cold after crawling through mug and water under a house to replace broken pipes, an engineering degree may look pretty good (just hope they don't go for some liberal arts route).
 

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I don't know, they will definitely see that one can make a great living in the trades, but down here, when their dad comes home soaking wet and freezing cold after crawling through mug and water under a house to replace broken pipes, an engineering degree may look pretty good (just hope they don't go for some liberal arts route).
Yeah liberal arts degrees will get you to settle on a job as a wedding photographer
 

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Man, those pups look like they are having a blast!! I don't know about in the Ozarks, but here, we've been going out and breaking the ice on the water tanks so my friend's cattle can get a drink.


yep - there are many trades that are very lucrative, when it comes to salary. Don't have to have get a BS education to find a job - sometimes those degrees mean absolutely less than the paper they are printed on (when it comes to earning a living). Trade schools and careers offer lots of opportunity.

To get back on track... we still have our snow... the dogs are enjoying it, way more than the humans. I feel for the cattle ranchers around here... I don't know much about caring for livestock, but water has got to be an issue for those living in the Ozarks. Or winter calving......Many of the ranches rely on stock ponds that have been frozen over now for a good 4 days. Bull Shoals Reservoir has frozen over too (Theodosia arm) The first time since the early 80's I believe.

Wayne, you get your water back on yet?

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Yeah liberal arts degrees will get you to settle on a job as a wedding photographer
More likely flipping burgers or stocking shelves.

Don't knock being a wedding photographer. In the right market, good ones can make in the 6 figures (sometimes on a single wedding), and having photographed perhaps a couple of hundred weddings (with my science degree) I have to say that there are worse ways to make money than sharing a happy day with young couples. Even at the low end weddings, which are what the market in this area mostly is, the food is usually good, the folks mostly happy, I love mariachi music and pan de polvo, and all brides are beautiful. You also get to see how different cultures celebrate the joining of two families. We have done everything from Jehova's Witness to Greek Orthodox, Roman Catholic to Pentecostal. I shot a Filipino wedding where they served roast suckling pig, and a Chinese wedding on the beach followed by a sit down seven course dinner. I am not really a wedding photographer though, in a small town, if you are going to be a photographer, you better be able to photograph everything from beautiful brides to the local livestock show. If I could make a living only photographing nice dogs, I think I would be so happy nobody would want to be around me, I would probably have to live in a metropolitan area to do that, and I prefer the small town pace.


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Man, those pups look like they are having a blast!! I don't know about in the Ozarks, but here, we've been going out and breaking the ice on the water tanks so my friend's cattle can get a drink.
In places with RELIABLE sources of electricity they have these thingys called electric tank deicers 😉
 

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Your Grandkid goes to school to learn 5 axis programing and machining,, He will always work! Good money,.. and VERY gratifying work.

Good places willtreat him/her like a god.
Those machines /computors dont run off of windmills.. They require petroleum base lubricants so they can perform..

Nothing more gratifying than watching a Nasa video, and seeing an astronaught using a tool outside the space station, you made..
 
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Your Grandkid goes to school to learn 5 axis programing and machining,, He will always work! Good money,.. and VERY gratifying work.

Good places willtreat him/her like a god.

Those machines /computors dont run off of windmills.. They require petroleum base lubricants so they can perform.
.Nothing more gratifying than watching a Nasa video, and seeing an astronaught (astronaut) using a tool outside the space station, you made.

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Most folks would not understand the level of knowledge required, skills required & experience required to make that happen.
& if your skillful enough they forgive the occasional; spelling error :).
 

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In places with RELIABLE sources of electricity they have these thingys called electric tank deicers 😉
No power near the water tanks out in the pastures. Also not something one would have ever thought one would need down here. It takes a pretty hard freeze to put ice on a trough ten feet in diameter and two and a half feet deep. Eight or ten hours at 30 degrees or so won't do it, and we don't even get that every year, so it's a walk across the pasture with a sledge hammer. Does a person good to be reminded what the "good old days" were really like.
 

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No water yet. I'm.beginning to think I have a frozen line somewhere. I noticed I have 20 psi at pressure tank. So pump is working, I think. Yesterday afternoon it was zero. When I went in garage water was running very slowly from faucet and bucket under faucet was 3/4 full. Yesterday afternoon it was empty.
I opened garage doors to let in heat. Will close when temperature goes below freezing and put an electric space heater in garage.
 

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Most folks would not understand the level of knowledge required, skills required & experience required to make that happen.
& if your skillful enough they forgive the occasional; spelling error :).
I watched a fascinating documentary of the design, construction, and deployment of the small SUV sized Martian rover Perseverance. The technical challenges of getting an object to a precise location on Mars is daunting. Join that with an extremely complex machine with hundreds of functions able to survive the launch from zero to 30,000 mph or whatever it takes to escape the atmosphere and then decelerate from 12,000 mph to 2 mph to be deployed and still functional in extreme temperatures both cold and hot. There was a segment about the technicians who took years to assemble the rover and it’s companion delivery vehicle working in a clean room. One of the techs, previously a bicycle mechanic, described a day that he spent the entire day installing 6 screws and that the end of that dat he was exhausted. The tiniest mistake by anyone could have destroyed the entire mission. All truly remarkable and almost unbelievable. Thousands even tens of thousands of people, mechanical engineers, physicists, metallurgists, composite and electrical engineers, and people with the patience, manual dexterity, and knowledge of mechanics all working as a team for a common goal, what a glorious feeling they all must have had when the “seven minutes of terror” were over and Perseverance reported in mission accomplished.
 

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I watched a fascinating documentary of the design, construction, and deployment of the small SUV sized Martian rover Perseverance. The technical challenges of getting an object to a precise location on Mars is daunting. Join that with an extremely complex machine with hundreds of functions able to survive the launch from zero to 30,000 mph or whatever it takes to escape the atmosphere and then decelerate from 12,000 mph to 2 mph to be deployed and still functional in extreme temperatures both cold and hot. There was a segment about the technicians who took years to assemble the rover and it’s companion delivery vehicle working in a clean room. One of the techs, previously a bicycle mechanic, described a day that he spent the entire day installing 6 screws and that the end of that dat he was exhausted. The tiniest mistake by anyone could have destroyed the entire mission. All truly remarkable and almost unbelievable. Thousands even tens of thousands of people, mechanical engineers, physicists, metallurgists, composite and electrical engineers, and people with the patience, manual dexterity, and knowledge of mechanics all working as a team for a common goal, what a glorious feeling they all must have had when the “seven minutes of terror” were over and Perseverance reported in mission accomplished.
We saw a tiniest mistake with the space mission that blew up.

What you are describing is one of a kind work, never been done before. So they have to rely on comparators
to feel their way. The technical knowledge accrued is invaluable in application to to more mundane uses. I was
involved with the building of the 1st 747, 757, 767 & many of the models of the 737. This was mostly dealing
with knowledge gained previously with many of the manufacturing methods & materials used new in many
situations. A space mission does not have that luxury.
 
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I have machined parts for aerospace work,,and the diameter of the cutter (endmill) was .003 in diameter About the diameter of a human hair.. (Imagine grinding, making that carbide endmill)
When parts are that small, tolerences are very tight..you cant make mistakes.. I observed the cutter remove 6060 aluminum at .0015 each pass,, under a microscope, mounted on the mill table..

I worked programs for Hubble Space Telescope repair, N.i.c.m.o.s, Widfield camera, Orion,Juno,,and several Rover missions,plus their prototype begginings.. Incredibly long stressfull days, both in machine shops machining parts,,and then clean rooms assembling them,, but the gratification of the end result of the work made it worthwhile.

I will say though,, the most difficult task I, think I have ever done was to train a dog so it posessed a reliable "sit".. I needed a LOT of coaching for it to happen..

The trades are a great place for people who arnt the 4 year college types.. The skills you learn ,many times carry over to other areas that you will enjoy having for common daily activities..
 
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A perfect dead drift with a fly and flyline, on a trout stream is difficult to master also! The 'Q.C." depeartment that lives below the surface lets you know the quality of your work pretty quick..

Station 8 on a skeet field is enough to start you drinkin..
 

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After watching the nightmares Texas has gone through,, I spent the day today, draggin out my burried, simple, Huskey generator. Drained the old gas, pulled the carb,cleaned the jet,and passageways, new plug. put everything back together, new gas,,and she purrs like a kitten..
 
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We have water! I guess I need more insulation in well house or some hay bales over the buried line from well to the house.
 
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We saw a tiniest mistake with the space mission that blew up.

What you are describing is one of a kind work, never been done before. So they have to rely on comparators
to feel their way. The technical knowledge accrued is invaluable in application to to more mundane uses. I was
involved with the building of the 1st 747, 757, 767 & many of the models of the 737. This was mostly dealing
with knowledge gained previously with many of the manufacturing methods & materials used new in many
situations. A space mission does not have that luxury.
If this airs anytime it is more than worth watching, I will watch again and again
Built for Mars: The Perseverance Rover, Airs Thursday, February 18, 9/8c, National Geographic
 

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This was only 1 of the coldest spells we have gone thru in Texas. I remember coming home from the service in November of 83 on December 18th we have wave after wave of attic fronts. Dr. Ed do you remember that a lot of our lakes froze over , white rock lake had people walking on the ice !
 
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