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This dog is nearly (If not) over a year old. My mom and brother bought him, and did.. well absolutely nothing with him but lock him up outside and pay little 52 second "Oh hey boy" moments a day. I was against getting a dog, but they insisted. Now that they have him they won't put money into getting him trained or anything of the sort. So I guess I have to do it.

I want him to be able to come in and out of the house, but he is an over active dog. My mom says I have to train him outside, because she doesn't want "Dirty dog and waste everywhere" and don't see the reasoning in wanting to bring him in.. -_-, so what do I do? I have no money as I'm 15. or anything. I need tips ways to do it
 

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Is there a local obedience club around where you live... sounds like you need a little help. Our local obedience club has inexpensive classes that are really great. The folks who run these classes have a lot of experience with dogs just like yours.

After you do that, get some time in with your dog and walk him a LOT. You will probably need a prong collar and know how to use it (herm-sprenger makes a great one). 30-45 minutes a day of walking and taking in everything is good for both of you. Don't yell at your dog and never chase him.

He will need to be crate trained. It makes keeping them inside the house a lot easier

After that, you will need to teach him to sit. I mean SIT really well, no matter what else is going on. If you do that, your dog will be welcome just about anywhere.

Good Luck.... this is not an impossible task, it just is going to take a little time.
 

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Good for you that you are concerned and willing to work with the poor guy! The situation you describe is exactly why many dogs end up at the pound - they sure don't train themselves.

Crate training is essential, I agree.

Check the library. A book such as "How to raise a puppy you can live with" will give you a plan. If they don't have the book, use interlibrary loan and they can get it for you.

Even though he's 15 months, the same training you'd use on a 3 month old will work.

As you have discovered, retrievers are smart, social athletes. They need company (dogs are pack animals), structured activity, and plenty of exercise. Without those things, they will find ways to keep themselves busy that you won't approve of.

Although I've offered few specifics, I really recommend hitting the library and borrowing a book or two on puppy training. The book I mention is a good one.
 

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Lots and lots of exercise, you need to drain his energy. If obedience classes are out of the question because of money, see if you can find someone locally that has some expereince with dogs and is willing to help you out. You might also think of rehoming him, it might be in his best interest. I`m not talking about taking him to the human society, but if you could find someone who wanted and was willing to take him on as long as they have experience training.
deb
 

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Exercise that dog and then train him. You will need to be patient. As has been suggested, train just like any other puppy. Use the NILIF method. You control all his resources. Crate training is a must.

I got the springer in my avatar at 6 mos. He was a kennel dog and the biggest problem was socializing him. I suspect that you will have the same problem.
 

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If you find the need to rehome your Golden, one suggestion is to contact your nearest Golden Retriever Rescue. They specialize in finding new approved homes for Goldens.

Another thought would be to contact them and see if they have somebody in their local group that would be willing to volunteer some of thier time to help you, so that you can keep your dog.
 

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First off you need to burn off some of that energy your dog has. Take him on daily walks for 30-40 minutes. This may be a chore to start out with as he is going to want to run. Over time should settle down and realize that he his going to get out again latter.

For your obedience training look into your Local Petsmart store. They have free or cheap obedience training that would help you get control of your dog. In addition to the OB he will also start to get socialized with other dogs and people.

What ever you decided to do consistency is the key!

Oh I almost forgot. Crate training is a must for a house dog.

Mike McArthur
 

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When you work with him, you may find that he isn't an over active dog. With the type of isolation that you describe, it wouldn't be unusual for the dog to be so excited with human interaction that he seems hyper.

Why not take this slowly and build trust with the dog first before you buy a crate, stuff him in it and expect him to be a house dog?

If you don't have the money for training or for an obedience class, there are some options.

Consider:

1) Watch an obedience class. Observe how the instructor interacts with the dog.
2) Go to the library and check out the dog training books there.
3) There are online resources that can help. Check out this site...it has incredible videos. A ton of them are free. Training Videos
4) Spend tons of time with your dog. IMHO, the best thing you can do (once you get a lil' pre-work done with the previous 3 steps ) is to walk the dog and don't allow it to pull you. You don't have to do perfect heel training at first, just walk the dog and correct it (with the correct collar) so that you are leading him and not the other way around.

IMHO, after you establish things well enough to get to the point where your dog can calmly go for a walk without pulling you, you're getting closer. Then, the other elements of dog training can happen.

You'll learn a lot from observing a trainer as well as the books and video that you watch. Most likely, as you spend more time with the dog and give him some consistant leadership, what you perceive now as being "over active" will fade.

The critter just may be sooo happy that someone is paying attendtion to him that he can't control himself. Keep a leash or a rope on him. Become his friend and learn how to be a calm, assertive and most importantly, CONSISTENT leader and you may have a good canine citizen on your hands before you know it.

IMHO, that is the first step before you try to bring him into the house, see him run and jump over everything and really make your mother grumpy.


Oh yeah...there are some AMAZING things you can do with your dog with reward training. Schutzhund (protection dog) trainers have figured some cool things out. This video is an example: Reward Training
 

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This dog is nearly (If not) over a year old. My mom and brother bought him, and did.. well absolutely nothing with him but lock him up outside and pay little 52 second "Oh hey boy" moments a day. I was against getting a dog, but they insisted. Now that they have him they won't put money into getting him trained or anything of the sort. So I guess I have to do it.

I want him to be able to come in and out of the house, but he is an over active dog. My mom says I have to train him outside, because she doesn't want "Dirty dog and waste everywhere" and don't see the reasoning in wanting to bring him in.. -_-, so what do I do? I have no money as I'm 15. or anything. I need tips ways to do it

Depending upon where you live.....my hunt test club is always looking for young folks to work and we pay them to do so....It might be a good place to start and find some friendly folks to help you out. A training group might also trade you throwing birds for them/helping out to start helping you with your dog. Give you some homework each week? just a thought?
 

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If you let us know where you're located, we may be able to put you in touch with people who can help. Goldens are people dogs and don't do well left alone in the back yard. Good for you for trying to help this dog!
Barb Branstad
 

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See if a local trainer will give you a discount on training since you are a junior handler. A lot of clubs give junior rates of half off for events and if the trainer sees that you are serious, many will be willing to work with you at a reduced price. Good luck and good for you for stepping in and helping the dog!
 
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