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How long should a dog rest in between training drills?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in metro denver, It takes about an hour to get to my training area when the traffic is good. When we get out there to work I want to spend some time at the training grounds. I only have two dogs, a seasoned dog and one going through FF right now, so only one dog to work right now, soon it will be two. I will usually work him for like 30-45 minutes, and then put him up.

how long should I let him rest between workouts. Would an hour be enough? I just hate driving an hour to do a half hours work, especially with gas prices.

I will place a poll.
 

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How much recovery time is needed I suppose really depends on the dog and the work. Mentally strenuous work seems to require more time to recover. We run each of the older dogs on a set-up (marks and/or blind, about 15/20 minutes or so), then put one up and let it rest while the others run, which usually means a rest of 30 minutes to an hour depending on how many dogs we're running and the type of set-up. But we only get to run any one dog twice or maybe 3 times on any given day (if we are lucky). I think 30 minutes to an hour is probably enough rest after most 10-20 minute set-ups, unless there was a long swim, or protracted battle of some sort.

The obvious solution is that you just need another dog or 2. :D :wink:
 

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One factor to be considered is the heat. My Chessies will go without stopping in cold weather, but cannot tolerate much exertion in the heat. Train by the tail and not by the time. If the dogs tail isn't up and happy, let em rest a while and cool down.
 

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Too many factors involved to respond in a poll. As mentioned heat, type of work being done (water vs land, marks vs blinds vs drills), distance involved, fitness level, age???
 

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Flexiability is the key - know what you want to do but don't be upset if you don't get it done - read the dog. Some dogs can do back to back setups, some can not. Keep in mind a dog doesn't learn squat if its physically or mentally tierd.

I like the "Train by the tail...." comment.

FOM
 

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reconabe said:
...I only have two dogs, a seasoned dog and one going through FF right now, so only one dog to work right now, soon it will be two. I will usually work him for like 30-45 minutes, and then put him up...quote]

I am pretty much a novice myself. Could you give an example of 45 minutes of sustained work for your dog?

When doing drills with a young dog my times are considerably below that. Training a tune-up I might hit 30 minutes or so.

Just looking for an idea of how others train.

Joe Miano
 

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I imagine it depends on what you're doing. When I ran my dog on TT I figured he was running between 2 and 3 miles during a workout. I did it in the morning before work, then put him up in his kennel for the day. Then out to run 3 or 4 marks that night.

Right now I'll go run a few land blinds right after work, then I put him up for 20 minutes, air him, then do a 15-20 minute session of swim-by. Then I figure he's had it.

I think ya really need to read the dog both physically and mentally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am talking about running set up marks, then resting and doing casting drills, then working blinds. not all at once, resting in between. I know a poll is not the most scientific or the best way to get a response, but it is good to get an idea. I know about he importance of reading my dog, but sometimes I think I am being too easy on him, which if anyhting I know will ensure his health.
 

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Wow this is the exact topic that we (training group and others) have had a ton of conversations about.

I firmly believe that the best is at least 3-4 hours between getting the dog out of the box. Your window of oppertunity for learning is VERY short on these dogs - 5-10 minutes MAX they are attentive and ready to learn. You have to make use of that attitude and mental process of the dog when he is fresh. Doing difficult, mentally demanding things with tired dog is not advancing the dog as much as you think. You are better served doing two things a day Am and Pm than 10 things in two hours.

PLENTY of programs that back this up.
 

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Gerard Rozas said:
I firmly believe that the best is at least 3-4 hours between getting the dog out of the box. Your window of oppertunity for learning is VERY short on these dogs. . . .
I agree with you 100%, however I believe there are things you can do that are less cognitive that can be grouped closer together timewise. In example -- confidence blinds. Generally speaking, drills that relate to improving momentum.

But I do agree, when teaching concepts, you have to spread it out. It seems to me you can erase your own results by getting a dog out too soon following a lesson.
 

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In any given am or pm, training session IMHO a dog has about 6 good retrieves in them. After that the dog needs several hours of rest & relaxation.
I've had dogs pick up 70-80 birds at a circle shoot but that is not training.

Tim
 
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