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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, Happy Easter Everyone.

So my husband is working, and I had just hung up after telling him we were going for a walk with the dogs. My friend arrives with her dog and off we go. We have a park and lake right behind the house, so we get to the park and let the dogs off lead so they can have some space and free time. We were walking along the road next to the lake, and it has a very thin tree line beside it, mabey two or three trees thick in some spots near the park area. Riley runs ahead, as he always does, but then takes off further, so I assume he has seen another dog and is going for a visit. We get around the corner, with the lake at our left and Riley has done visiting with some friends of ours, and is heading back. Pyper stalks Riley all the time. So she is hunched down behind a snowdrift, and I tell her wait, wait......and as soon as Riley gets a little closer, I say, OK.... Well, she gets to him and she chases Riley back to me and just as I am wiping all the slobber off his face, out comes this HUGE FRICKEN WOLF from the tree line, only FEET away from us and just stands there looking at us, and then heads back towards the lake through the trees. Tracy grabs her dog, and Pyper goes a few feet and comes back. I put the lead back on and give her to tracy,and cut through the path the dogs took and go after Riley. The wolf and Riley are standing a few feet on the ice and the wolf has its tail between his legs, and they circle a bit and the wolf takes a few steps away. Riley causiously walks behind and the wolf turns around, this time his tail is not between his legs, and the teeth are bared. Riley bares his teeth, but is very causious around this animal, and they are nose to nose with both of the teeth snapping at each other, but not biting. I called Riley and my boy came to me. I wa so relieved. The wolf stood for a second and then walked a few more feet onto the ice and laid down. So now we all have the dogs back on their leashes and we head over to our friends who are standing in the open area with their dog Rosie. All of us are commenting on how beautiful this animal is and wishing we had our cameras, and wondering if its a male or female, or if there are any others out there.
Because of the way he put his tail between his legs when Riley came out, I thought mabey a female showing less dominance....something a scout might do. When it got out onto the lake and laid down, I thought mabey it was pretending to be wounded so another dog might come and check it out. The ravens were even landing beside the wolf. So it laid there while we stood and watched it. When we turned to keep walking, she/he got up and started to come towards us. We figure no matter where we go, this wolf is coming as well, so of coarse we shorten the walk and head back. We start walking on the back road to come home, and our friends are behind us with their dog. I turn around, and there's the wolf standing at the corner watching. He kept lookin behind, but we couldn't see any other animals anywhere. I was going to come and grab my camera and go back and see if I could get some pictures.... So we get across the main Penn Lake road,and I hear Angelina yelling at us to come here. so we run towards her and she's yelling "go call someone, go call someone". Her husband was coming behind her. We turn around and run home and make a call. I have the OPP coming. I shoo all the dogs into the house (5 of them) and walk back out of the house. Keith is at the corner, and I walk out to him to let him know that the OPP are supposed to be coming because the bylaw officer is out of town. There was the wolf. He was standing at the corner. We are both making noise to shoo him off as we back towards my house, and the wolf starts running towards us and his teeth are showing. Keith has a little stick and he is still yelling at the wolf, so I run to the neighbours two doors down who is an OPP, but he is not home. Now the wolf is at the corner of my house. This animal stands to my waiste...at least. The wolf walks down the side trail beside my home, and is peering through the bushes at us. Eventually he goes back over to the boom logs next to the road, and just stands there. I had gone into the house to grab a rifle, but was so snow blinded, I couldn't see anything. I came back outside and the neighbour had seen a little of what was going on, and brought out a little of his own persuasion, and scared it into the bush.

Whooooo weeee. That wolf was absolutely incredible. The size of him or her was unbelievable and the fact that he was out looking for food or a little bit of excitement at that time of day and that close to humans is also unbelievable. I called Rene and told him all about. I know I wouldn't have shot to scare it into the bush....
 

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Debbie,

I have been to Nipigon 3 times moose hunting. Of course I went past Marathon to get there. Beautiful country.

Once just outside Nipigon late at night we saw a wolf cross the road. The last time I was there was a couple years ago. We were calling for moose in the evening, and a wolf came within about 15 yards of us. The guide felt it was hoping a calf was there. He feels that the wolves get most of the moose calves in a year.

Your story reminded me that the guide and his brother have had wolves come out of the bush, and onto a logging road. Then the wolf would lay down and act submissive. They said they have had wolves follow them in plain sight for awhile too. No explanation other than curiosity.

It is a beautiful area but it looks like a hard place to make a living, whether you are a moose or a wolf...

John
 

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story

Quite a story. We now have coyotes around here. Someting that's happened in the past few years. My initial reaction is to "euthanize" it. I'm sure others have opposing veiws. I'd like to hear them. I know the coyotes kill an amazing number of deer. Mostly fawns in the spring.
 

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wolf

Debbie, what a story!!! Very well written, you should send to readers digest. A good story to share with all.
 

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Wow , what an exciting story.
Wolves,coyotes usually do not kill unless it is for food, or to protect themselves/young. Coyotes are more scavenger-type animals rather than hunting. If they do kill something, it's usually a small animal or rodent(mice,moles,Mrs. Jones poodle? :shock: )Wolves usually hunt in a pack or with another if the prey is large.And then they will kill the weak and/or the young because they are easier prey.
While deer hunting in the great North woods of Wis. I have seen both.Also have had the unfortunate pleasure of also seeing packs of wild dogs running deer. They kill for sport(and love the chase) and think nothing of killing anything in their path. My dad and I were run up trees yrs. agoby a pack. We each shot as many as we could before they scattered.Very scary!!
Thanks for sharing your story on Easter!!
Sue
 

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Debbie
Great story -- and certainly topped my Easter
 

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Anyone think maybe the wolf was someone's pet who was let loose. Some people, not the brightest individuals own wolves as pets. It is weird that it followed you and lurked around the houses with no fear.

My other thought is that it might have been kicked out of its pack and was looking for a new pack to join. It could be a younger wolf. Dispersal is a common occurance in wolf packs and encourages genetic diversity.
 

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Wow, how scary,but exciting at the same time. My husband traps, and people are amazed at the size of the coyotes he gets each season. They are also surprised when he tells them where he got them, usually in their own back fields. I haven't heard much about wild dogs? In what areas of the country ? In PA, where I live, the coyotes are plentiful, and I know what happens to the feral cats most of the time. I wonder if you should carry a handgun with you in the future? I do. Thanks for sharing the story. I love the "look" of wolves, but would not consider having one as a pet. I know of several people who brag about owing wolf mixes, and don't think it is a good idea. Be careful next time you are out!! Maria
 

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I wonder if you should carry a handgun with you in the future? I do.
That's one difference between Canada and the US. Handguns are illegal in Canada.
 

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You may think that is scary. I can home from the Field Trial to find the wifes family with kids in tow and they are inside the house. They ate all the food and drank all the booze and left soon enough without the kids breaking to much stuff :wink:
 

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i didn't know handguns were illegal in Canada. It the anti's had their way, PA, and the USA would be the same. I am in favor of owing one,I just hope I really never have to use one. But I also believe in self - defense. I am sure the PETA people want us not to use live birds either.
 

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ginger69 said:
Wow , what an exciting story.
Wolves,coyotes usually do not kill unless it is for food, or to protect themselves/young. Coyotes are more scavenger-type animals rather than hunting. If they do kill something, it's usually a small animal or rodent(mice,moles,Mrs. Jones poodle? :shock: )
I disagree with the notion that coyotes primarily scavenge and only kill small animals like mice and moles.

On my dad's farm (Newnan, GA) we have witnessed:

1) Coyotes in a pack chasing deer.
2) Single coyotes chasing deer.
3) Single coyotes stalking turkeys.
4) Packs of coyotes surrounding cows with newborn calves.
5) A pack of coyotes surrounding my stepmother's Saint Bernard. He was in a chain link pen with a concrete floor and a roof on it, so they couldn't get to him or vice versa, but they had him surrounded and were making a heck of a racket. His pen was probably less than 30 yards from their house.
6) A dramatic decrease in the number of rabbits and stray dogs and cats on the farm that coincided with the arrival of coyotes in approximately 1992.

Also, I've heard of (but haven't personally seen) turkey hunters who have had coyotes stalk right up on them and/or attack their turkey decoys as a result of the turkey hunter yelping like a hen...understand this is at a time of year when there are no young polts and all turkeys are at least one year old. Several coyotes have been killed at close range by turkey hunters as a result.

Coyotes are extremely adaptable and that includes their diet. They will hunt deer (fawns and/or injured are most susceptible of course), turkey (I hear they do quite a bit of damage to the polt hatch in some areas), quail (much to the detriment of the quail population), cattle (calves), domestic dogs (for food or territory, I don't know), cats, rabbits, and anything else that presents an easy opportunity. I also think they may be responsible for the destruction of some goose nests on our property (and the eggs therein).

The one thing I have not encountered with coyotes is any kind of boldness with regard to humans. They are pretty darn skittish although I have had one recently that was not afraid of my truck until I stopped to look at him through binoculars (too bad I wasn't looking through a scope).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In a small town like this, the likelyhood of someones pet going stray or becoming wild is not likely. It was definetely a wolf, and I am hoping he goes a little deeper into the woods, because I am not going to be impressed if I can't walk in the bush trails with the dogs anymore...

I think I would rather come home to a wolf then "In-Laws" or their kids anyday. I like kids, I just don't want to keep them anymore.... :lol:
 

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Howard, handguns aren't illegal in Canada...they are classified as 'restricted' weapons, which means you can use them for target shooting, but you have to have a permit which allows you to carry the firearm to and from a gun range.
 

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Lot's of coyotes around here and getting bolder all the time.One yell used to scare them off easy.Now they stand thier ground more.My most memorable encounter was during a deer season.Long before sunrise I was sleeping in a lawnchair in a pit blind with my head just at ground level.I woke up with a feeling that something was looking at me.I looked up and in the dark it looked to me like a yearling deer was looking down at me.I could just see the silouette against the sky.It startled me and I jumped up to scare it off.That's when the "deer" began to growl at me.My gun was still in the case.I grabbed the lawnchair and started swinging it and yelling and a second coyote started growling.I just kept swinging the chair and yelling and they finally backed off and went away.I usually sleep with one eye open in pit blinds now.
 

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I believe that I said "Usually" are scavengers.
Like any animal (Humans included), they will adapt to whatever their environment offers them. Food "Is" their main objective with regards to "Huntdawgs'" last post.
I believe that I also said that they will hunt in packs when the game is too large for one animal to kill.
I also have coyotes behind the kennel that I have heard on occasions, I have also seen a glimpse of them on a rare occasion.
I am in a area that doesn't require me to be shooting coyotes just because they exist.They pose no danger to livestock,family pets or humans. So we just co-exist. I enjoy their voices on a clear night. :D
Sue
 
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