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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is my situation,
I have a chocolate lab right now that is going on 8 years old and has always been an outside dog. I want to get another pup this summer and make it an inside/outside dog most generally a house dog unless we are training or hunting.

My issue is as follows; I work extremely long hours 5 or 6 days a week (6:30am-6:00pm) and do not live close enough to commute home during the lunch hour. With this being said; how would you contain your dog while being gone? (Although my wife does not work as many hours as I do, she could relieve the dog in a shorter amount of time than I can, if kept crated inside)

I realize keeping a dog contained for this extended amount of time is borderline abuse and really do not think it is a good idea. So that leads me to option two.

Would you crate train your dog to be in the crate at night and then put her in a run outside during the day?
How would this transition be when it is too hot to be outside or too cold?
Would the dog be able to hold itself on these days inside without having an accident?
Would the dog be able to decipher that would be acceptable to relieve themselves in the run but not in the crate?
Is this method of thinking even the direction I should be going?

Any guidance you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

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You didn't say where you were and weather is always a major factor. We're up north and our golden is in her run during the day when we're at work. I use 15 degrees as the point where I keep her inside, but my wife gets home around 3:30 to let her out if she's been inside all day. Daisy's house is a double walled, insulated unit. We always have the option of putting a heating pad in her house. At ten years old, maybe this will be year for one. No problem in training her to air in the kennel. They generally train themselves. She spends her nights inside our house. If being too hot is your concern, I'll defer to someone that has experience in that area.
With a pup, I believe in crating at ALL times except when you are in immediate contact with them. Once trained, we dumped the crate at night routine, not to say that using one is a bad idea. The indoor-outdoor scenario works great for us as well as the dog. Good luck.
 

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The beginning states of crate training requires 100% focus when the critter is out of the crate. If done well, it won't take the critter long to understand it gets praised for doing its business outside and that the opposite will happen if it attempts (remember 100% focus) to do its business inside your home.

Crate training is the way to go. But after the early stages of crate training, I've found that letting the dog sleep outside the crate at night can be done within 4-5 months. At about 4 months old, our Golden pup is 100% reliable (knock on wood) loose in my daughter's bedroom outside of the crate. (Of course, the hours leading up to bedtime are filled with training, exercise and pup/human interaction.) Pup sleeps all night and stirs only when the alarm clock rings. (My daughter is an extremely light sleeper and immediately knows when the pup starts to stir.) Mornings are filled with pup following my daughter around and being part of the family. Pup is crated during the day (without messing its crate) but is immediately free and part of the family right after school. I feel that this interaction is invaluable for a pup bonding with a family member.

So...with all that blathering...my point is that it doesn't take long to have a house trained pup. If someone can sneak home to let the pup out in a reasonable timeframe, it may work out faster than you think. In a few short months, you'll have a pup that will be reliable in the house and then also have the option to keep the critter in an outside run if the weather is nice.

No animal will soil its own den on purpose. So, once it has control of its bladder, it won't mess in its own crate unless it is crated for an unreasonable period of time. If loose within a big run, that's a different story.
 

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So...with all that blathering....


Brian,
A bunch of us are still waiting for the required puppy pics which in your case require they include your daughter.:confused::confused:
I need a cyber puppy fix!!!
 

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Would you crate train your dog to be in the crate at night and then put her in a run outside during the day?
How would this transition be when it is too hot to be outside or too cold?
Would the dog be able to hold itself on these days inside without having an accident?
Would the dog be able to decipher that would be acceptable to relieve themselves in the run but not in the crate?
Is this method of thinking even the direction I should be going?
If it were me, and spring going into summer, I would put the puppy in the run during the day and bring it in at night and crate at night. I'm not into crating pups all day long to potty train them because they need to be let out at least every 4 hours. If anything I would buy an ex pen and have a potty box. They figure it out that they shouldn't go in the crate unless you leave them in them too long. I would not start with a puppy outside in the winter though. I have some dogs that come inside at night and outside during the day. As adults they are fine and I think that is what many people do instead of crating them all day.
 

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My pup has been going into the kennel every morning about 6 a.m. and doesn't get back into the house sometimes until 6 or 7 pm and has not had one bit of a problem making the adjustment. 100% reliable by 3 mos of age.
 

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This is my favorite. It was taken during one of our visits to see the pups. Thanks for askin'!

[/quote]

Cute pup. Looks like you have one very happy daughter!
 

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My pup has been going into the kennel every morning about 6 a.m. and doesn't get back into the house sometimes until 6 or 7 pm and has not had one bit of a problem making the adjustment. 100% reliable by 3 mos of age.

Is your run concrete? Do you have any tile flooring or an unfinished basement floor? If so, you've answered a question that I had about leaving a pup in a concrete run during the first few months. Great! I had it in my mind that if allowed to relieve itself in a concrete run, a ceramic tile floor or a concrete floor in a garage or in an unfinished basement may cause it some confusion.

A few years back a friend brought his young dog over who had just been kenneled during his vacation. We were working out in my unfinished basement. The dog seemed to think my basement floor was equivalent to his kennel run.

That's why I formed my opinion. The first few months go fast. I figured why confuse the critter by teaching it that sometimes concrete floors are ok to relieve itself upon? Why not just wait until it totally gets that only grass/dirt is ok via crate training? But, if your pup is 100% reliable with a ceramic tile floor or a concrete basement / garage floor - wow! I was wrong.
 

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If anything I would buy an ex pen and have a potty box. They figure it out that they shouldn't go in the crate unless you leave them in them too long.
This is what I was going to suggest. Ask your breeder if they do the potty box training and if so, it'll be a breeze.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the opinions, to answer a few of the questions. I live in Kansas so yes it does get cold and does get hot. I have always used the 15 degree mark for being to cold and the 95 degree mark for being to hot.

So when I get my pup I will work on the transition from crating him during the night and out in the run during the day.

Thanks again,
 
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