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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A while back someone posted on here about a guy named Paul Billy. He hunted and ran dogs in HRC. He had Chessies, not Labs which is okay because everyone has got to have a flaw. ;) I couldn't find the original post, not very good at the search feature thingy on here. Anyway, the end of the post gave a link to his facebook page with a request for everyone to "like" his page. So I figured sure, I can do that. I followed the link and "liked" the page. He needed a kidney. He needed one bad, and time was not on his side. I hoped he would find someone to give him one.

I work as a federal meat inspector. I am on the slaughter lines every day. I see each animal alive and then I observe and palpate its body and all its internal organs after it is slaughtered to ensure it is free from disease. It's not a fun job but it does afford me a unique opportunity to see how the body works, and what it looks like when animals get sick. Every time I cut out a polycystic kidney I thought of this guy. That's what he had! " I sure hope he finds a kidney," I thought.

Then it hit me. Was I really that wrapped up in my own life that I wouldn't take the time out to at least call the number and see if I was a match? After all, it's not like they were going to come yank out one of my kidneys if i was a match. I would still be able to make an informed decision whether to be a donor or not. I called the number. And talked to a very nice lady who asked me some questions about my medical history. i answered all her questions and everything was looking very positive. I was the right blood type. I was a good age (43). No health issues that were red flags, until she asked me how my pregnancy had gone. I told her I had developed very mild toxemia type symptoms the last couple weeks of gestation, and just like that I was excluded from being a donor. The transplant lady said that they are very, very strict about only taking the healthiest of people who have no risk of problems that may develop in the future. I felt deflated and sorely disappointed that I could not help keep someone from dying. But I also felt at peace knowing that I had tried, and that I would never go to my grave wondering if I could have saved a life.

I talked to the lady for a little bit after that and found out some things. First, they are very careful about who they select as a donor so the chances of donating a kidney and then needing it back sometime in the future are practically nonexistent. Second, the recipient's insurance pays for the transplant procedure and fundraising efforts exist to cover other expenses a donor may have. Third, in many states federal workers are given 6 weeks PAID TIME OFF to recover from the surgery. That's right, you don't need to use your accrued annual or sick time! California is one of those states.

I told the lady that I was disappointed that I could not help. She told me that although I could not donate an organ, it would be a big help if I just spread the word about my experience with the process. Jeez lady, do you know what you are asking?? I HATE drawing attention to myself, i don't like the spotlight I like to be the one behind the scenes working my ash off.

So I am helping in the only way I can. If this post inspires even one person to pick up the phone it will be worth it. And please, go on facebook and "like" the page Paul Billy Needs A Kidney. It will help even if you are not a regular facebook user. I hope you get your kidney Paul Billy, and I hope to hear about you running in the Grand someday.
 

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A while back someone posted on here about a guy named Paul Billy. He hunted and ran dogs in HRC. He had Chessies, not Labs which is okay because everyone has got to have a flaw. ;) I couldn't find the original post, not very good at the search feature thingy on here. Anyway, the end of the post gave a link to his facebook page with a request for everyone to "like" his page. So I figured sure, I can do that. I followed the link and "liked" the page. He needed a kidney. He needed one bad, and time was not on his side. I hoped he would find someone to give him one.

I work as a federal meat inspector. I am on the slaughter lines every day. I see each animal alive and then I observe and palpate its body and all its internal organs after it is slaughtered to ensure it is free from disease. It's not a fun job but it does afford me a unique opportunity to see how the body works, and what it looks like when animals get sick. Every time I cut out a polycystic kidney I thought of this guy. That's what he had! " I sure hope he finds a kidney," I thought.

Then it hit me. Was I really that wrapped up in my own life that I wouldn't take the time out to at least call the number and see if I was a match? After all, it's not like they were going to come yank out one of my kidneys if i was a match. I would still be able to make an informed decision whether to be a donor or not. I called the number. And talked to a very nice lady who asked me some questions about my medical history. i answered all her questions and everything was looking very positive. I was the right blood type. I was a good age (43). No health issues that were red flags, until she asked me how my pregnancy had gone. I told her I had developed very mild toxemia type symptoms the last couple weeks of gestation, and just like that I was excluded from being a donor. The transplant lady said that they are very, very strict about only taking the healthiest of people who have no risk of problems that may develop in the future. I felt deflated and sorely disappointed that I could not help keep someone from dying. But I also felt at peace knowing that I had tried, and that I would never go to my grave wondering if I could have saved a life.

I talked to the lady for a little bit after that and found out some things. First, they are very careful about who they select as a donor so the chances of donating a kidney and then needing it back sometime in the future are practically nonexistent. Second, the recipient's insurance pays for the transplant procedure and fundraising efforts exist to cover other expenses a donor may have. Third, in many states federal workers are given 6 weeks PAID TIME OFF to recover from the surgery. That's right, you don't need to use your accrued annual or sick time! California is one of those states.

I told the lady that I was disappointed that I could not help. She told me that although I could not donate an organ, it would be a big help if I just spread the word about my experience with the process. Jeez lady, do you know what you are asking?? I HATE drawing attention to myself, i don't like the spotlight I like to be the one behind the scenes working my ash off.

So I am helping in the only way I can. If this post inspires even one person to pick up the phone it will be worth it. And please, go on facebook and "like" the page Paul Billy Needs A Kidney. It will help even if you are not a regular facebook user. I hope you get your kidney Paul Billy, and I hope to hear about you running in the Grand someday.
LIKE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!-Paul
 

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dmccarty, your efforts are applauded. The world needs more people like you. That was a courageous and valiant effort to help someone in true need.

All of this hits very close to me because the company I work for makes the DNA typing kits for solid organ and bone marrow for transplants. This means that our kits will type the DNA of the affected patient and then do the same for the possible donor. There are varying levels of resolution needed for different types of transplants and my company covers them all. Depending on the DNA sequence of both the patients is where you start off with determining a possible match. There many other tests to run to ensure compatibility also. I am also a member of the American Society of Histocompatibility and Immunology in which I just got back from a continuing education workshop in Washington DC where I met living donors and recipients and the story behind it all.

It is a very touching to hear the impact of the products that we make could potentially save someone's life. For his sake and the sake of all those out there in need of a transplant I pray that they can indeed find that special someone to save their life like the folks that I met at the conference.
 

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I want to take this opportunity, on behalf of my family, 3 Chessies and myself, to extend a BIG Thank You to dmccarty! I am Paul Billy the person in her post who needs a kidney. What dmccarty did by calling and learning about being a donor was amazing true Hero stuff! Heros to me are not famous, but they are the people who like to work behind the scenes and step up in a selfless manner in a time of crises. That is exactly what dmccarty did. No worries that she could not donate. It was not meant to be, although I desperately need a new kidney, I would never want it to be at the expense of someones health.

Additionally, thank you for helping to spread the word! Finding a Living Donor is in part a numbers game - the more people who know the better chance I have.

So to my fellow dog people, please check out and Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Kidney4Paul

And if you would like to confidentially talk to a Living Donor coordinator to find out about donating (no obligation) - just call (717) 231-8751 and state you are interested in Learning about being a Living donor.

God Bless - Paul
 

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In 2007 I was blessed to receive a kidney from my wife. A one in 60,000 match! Her incision was less than two inches and her recovery was amazingly fast. In fact, two weeks post op she was moving kitchen appliances (against my and the doc's wishes,btw) please consider living organ donations. If anyone has any questions, feel free to PM.
 

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Very cool thread .... thank you.

There are GOOD PEOPLE in the world and here we read about a few; Sometimes life can shadow that.
 

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As a perent of a daughter that desperately needs a kidney I applaud your efforts to bring this to the forefront. My wife and I checked and as we are over the hill in our mid 70 and have smoked most of our lives so they won't even concider checking us out. That leaves our only son who is not compatible so its up to someone unknown to step up. I surely hope that happens and your post might help the process along. Thanks for posting it to the forum.
Clay
 

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Bumping this one up:)
 

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Thanks to all the support we are up to 431 Likes! How doe that help well 431 Like has lead to over 10,000 Facebook Users being exposed to my story! An amazing number. So if you haven't yet please take a second to like: https://www.facebook.com/Kidney4Paul

Clayton - my thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

Lee - Thank you for putting yourself out there as a resource.
 

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To be honest, the thought of being a living donor scares me. Many years ago, though, I had to think very seriously about it. A mother and her daughter came to work for the company I worked for, and we became friends. The husband is a hunter, and we became friends as well. The daughter was the same age as I. However, she and her younger brother were both born with Cystic Fibrosis. If you don't know what that is, it's an auto-immune disorder that causes the body to attack itself. She received a double lung transplant at the age of 21, and he received the same at the age of 21. A few years after I met them, the daughter had to go on dialysis (sp?) 3 times a week, because the anti-rejection drugs killed her kidneys. So they started looking for donors. That's what really made me think about being an organ and tissue donor. It turned out that her mother was a very close match, and she was able to donate one of her kidneys to her daughter. However, the next time I renewed my drivers license, I indicated that I want to be a donor. She lived for another year, before she passed away of other complications, at the age of 26.

Recently, her brother caught pneumonia, and his body began rejecting the lungs he had received. He was placed at the top of the list to receive another pair, but he passed away before any became available. He was only 30 years old.

Even if you're not able to be a living donor, please seriously consider being a donor. You could potentially save several lives by doing so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To be honest, the thought of being a living donor scares me.]

I think everyone who thinks seriously about being an organ donor is scared, at least a little. I know I was. But to me, not making the call to inquire was the same as seeing a person drowning and not even attempting to dial 911. If by some chance I can help a person live, just by "liking" a Facebook page or by making a quick phone call to a transplant lady, I would feel awfully selfish if I didn't make the effort. So that thought won out over my fears and I picked up the phone.

Kudos to you for being a donor. I think that is a very honorable thing to do. I also have "donor" noted on my driver's license. Whoever thought of putting that little pink dot on a driver's license has probably saved thousands of lives by now.
 

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Bless you for trying to be a donor.
 

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When this topic was posted I was closing in on 400 Facebook Likes for my page https://www.facebook.com/Kidney4Paul. When I started this page I never imagined I could hit anything close to 400. Well as of this post we are at 447 Likes! Mostly do to support from the RTF family.

On behalf of myself and my family I want to say THANK YOU!

God Bless - Paul
 
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