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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all hear so much about the subject.
But the resulting problems explanation is usually vague (at least to me).
Could someone explain what some of the issues are that can result from an "improperly socialized pup?"

Thanks,


stan b
 

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There are a multitude of things that this could affect. Here are a few I can think of.

Improper socialization with other dogs:

shyness around other dogs
aggression
misunderstanding of dog communication, which could lead to a variety of confrontation type issues
and more...

improper socialization with people:
see above...
no desire to please people
total disinterest in people

I am sure there are a lot of other possible issues...
 

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Aggression or fear without apparent cause or reason are the two most common issues you will see in an un-socialized pup. Which one you see usually depends on the personality of the pup in question.
 

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Is growing up with other dogs in the same household considered proper socialization? I have never been a fan of the dog walks and parks, nor did I ever want to take young pups to tests/trials because of the risk of disease. So they have pretty much only had each other. Interesting, the oldest dog, who had the least dog companionship until pup number two came along when he was 3 years old, is the low man on the totem pole now. Yet he still "teases" and taunts them. Is it because he did not have a "mentor" dog?
 

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courage and conviction are the one's i've seen

Since the dog had not been introduced to everything that it would see in it's adult life when it was fearless (ie puppie) it will develop blocks towards things when it is older. I have seen this when a police dog wouldn't jump down into a crawl space when commanded to because he had never been introduced to it before.

I have found it's a lot easier with a hunting dog as you do not need to include everything in the indoor world as well to the dog but there are still lots of stuff to check off. Wild animals, cows, horses, vehicles, little dogs. Also getting the dog to go where ever you want them to go ie up on tables and benches, jumping over low obsticals. And People can't get them around enough people from 10 weeks to 4 months. then i found you want to taper it off so the dog realizes that your its main pack leader. except kids. Dogs should be able to be around kids all the time (supervised of course) This is because kids are the perfect prey item, quick movements, loud screechy sounds, dramatic movements.

I feel this is the one part of training I have been good with. Luckily i live in a town so I can take care of most of this on a daily walk. If i lived in the country it may be harder, or it may take a few trips to town.
 

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The responses so far as to the consequences of poor socialization are right on. 2Tall, my answer to you is that the first 4 mos are the most important for sure and no, it's not enough to just raise a pup around other dogs. There are places that are safe to take puppy, you just have to seek them out. The local Home Depot isn't very likely to have parvo on its floor, nor is the local oil/lube place, etc.

My 10.5 wk old co-owned pup spent the whole weekend at a competition obedience workshop and when not crated, was passed around to be held by several people. She also met several nice dogs. Sure, she could have been exposed to kennel cough or such, but I am not as concerned about her vaccination wise since she had 3 good parvo vaccines (and parvo is our biggie here) in her already. There is a risk/benefit consideration, no doubt about it, but so far, every one of my pups have gone to training workshops, puppy kindergarten, hunt tests, agility trials and even small dog shows and have not caught a thing. Socially, it's so important. Some of the older dogs there this weekend should have taken a lesson from the well behaved baby as a matter of fact.... :rolleyes:
 

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Fear of:
- People
- Dogs
- New Environment

Inability to learn

Aggression

Eating disorders
 

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just to add a random thought....I take all my puppies to kids' sporting events like little league baseball, peewee football, and so on. They get to see tons of people of all ages, and everyone loves a puppy. There's a lot of noise/commotion/etc. going on. And generally, there are few or no other dogs there.
I board dogs for a living, and you can tell right away which ones have been socialized and which have not. In a word, confidence. The ones who have been socialized come in, even if it's their first time, fearless and happy, ready to explore a new place. The ones who have not been socialized are much more likely to pull back, be timid or hesitant, and often times show fear aggression.
 

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I take my puppies to puppy socialization class. Then to obedience 1 and 2. Then off to the pro.
 

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I take my puppy to a puppy class, but more importantly, they always get to spend time at Auntie Mar's and Uncle Thom's auto repair shop! :D They get handled by a multitude of people, they get used to loud noises, and in a pinch, they can chane a tire and perform a quick oil change. :D After work, they get plopped in a x-pen in the front yard for supervised petting by neighborhood hoodlums (I mean children) with other dogs walking by. They learn to play in a sprinkler, learn respect for the elder dogs in the household, etc.


Dogs who are not well socialized may bark their heads off, be aggressive at the airing yard gate due to fear of being in the midst of a herd of dogs, be independent and not a team player, and be fearful of upside down canoes and firehydrants.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I take my puppy to a puppy class, but more importantly, they always get to spend time at Auntie Mar's and Uncle Thom's auto repair shop! :D They get handled by a multitude of people, they get used to loud noises, and in a pinch, they can chane a tire and perform a quick oil change. :D After work, they get plopped in a x-pen in the front yard for supervised petting by neighborhood hoodlums (I mean children) with other dogs walking by. They learn to play in a sprinkler, learn respect for the elder dogs in the household, etc.


Dogs who are not well socialized may bark their heads off, be aggressive at the airing yard gate due to fear of being in the midst of a herd of dogs, be independent and not a team player, and be fearful of upside down canoes and firehydrants.
That actually kinda describes me........:rolleyes:


RK
 

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While certainly under-socialization can cause these problems--it is not the only cause. I hate it when people assume that a dog is not well socialized based solely on behavior without knowing its complete history.

I've known people with pups who have put forth lots of effort in socializing but even from the get-go the puppy has fear and doesn't recover well. When the dog is full grown people are so convinced that the dog must have not been well socialized or that the dog surely must have been severely abused because of its behavior. Not always the case...sometimes its just genetic.

Kind of reminds me when I was younger and people used to assume my parents were abusive because myself and my siblings were always quiet and withdrawn individuals.
 

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While certainly under-socialization can cause these problems--it is not the only cause. I hate it when people assume that a dog is not well socialized based solely on behavior without knowing its complete history.
The question was "what issues can be caused by under socialization"

No one said that the only cause of the behaviors was under socialization. Obviously, many of these behaviors can be caused by other things as well.
 

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While certainly under-socialization can cause these problems--it is not the only cause. I hate it when people assume that a dog is not well socialized based solely on behavior without knowing its complete history.
Thank you GoldenSail. Some pups are born spooky and no amount of socialization will/would ever fix them. Still, if you have one, the more you can do with him the better he'll be.
 

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and be fearful of upside down canoes and firehydrants.

for once I'm the one checking the urban dictionary..... I'll report back with my findings...
 

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closest I got was the, "Upside down Buffalo Jerk"..... better not share the definition here..learn something new everyday...
 

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The question was "what issues can be caused by under socialization"

No one said that the only cause of the behaviors was under socialization. Obviously, many of these behaviors can be caused by other things as well.
You are right but some posts suggested that they know when an adult dog has been under socialized based on behavior. I've seen people say it before too and it is a HUGE pet peeve of mine. My sister has a dog that has fear aggression toward people and everyone wants to constantly blame it on under socialization or past abuse...but she's had this dog since it was 6 weeks old and knows the history. The dog had fear problems pretty early on despite puppy classes and lots of socialization. She's not the only person I know that has had this.

Just wanted to throw it out there as food for thought whenever someone encounters an adult dog with these behaviors before they start making assumptions.
 

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While certainly under-socialization can cause these problems--it is not the only cause. I hate it when people assume that a dog is not well socialized based solely on behavior without knowing its complete history.

I've known people with pups who have put forth lots of effort in socializing but even from the get-go the puppy has fear and doesn't recover well. When the dog is full grown people are so convinced that the dog must have not been well socialized or that the dog surely must have been severely abused because of its behavior. Not always the case...sometimes its just genetic.

Kind of reminds me when I was younger and people used to assume my parents were abusive because myself and my siblings were always quiet and withdrawn individuals.
While very true, but, the OP in this case asked what do you see in an improperly socialized pup... it can certainly have other causes. And you are correct, the assumption would be unfair.

I do think our performance dogs are required to "go with the flow" in kennel, training, and competition environments. Some dogs just can't handle it.

Oh Stan, you made me think of another one..... submissive urination. :D
 
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