RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner
21 - 40 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,393 Posts
How does one do that ? while attempting to turn the other way and trying to be more exciting or rewarding/luring with a tasty morsel , and the other dog off lead want's the same . How do you ensure others ?
If the other dog's offlead and coming for your dog, the suggestion is to sit your dog, get out in front, and keep the other dog from getting to your dog. While asking the owner to get control of his dog.

At least this is what works for me.

The being more exciting to your dog part while stepping off the path and facing away assumes the owner of the other dog realizes you're not interested in letting either dog invade the others' space and will keep on going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Really not sure anyone could help without an onsite evaluation. That said I've been familiar with a couple of Chessie's who some might call aggressive under certain circumstances. One that killed 2 dogs at 2 separate times who invaded his yard; never aggressive to his family but strangers in his space NO. Another who ran a UPS man up a tree, becuase said driver choose to enter a gate when "his" young children were in the front yard alone. Thing with both of them was they were never anything but loving and tolerant of their people-pact; outsiders watch out. So basically very good OB training and a strong handler that knew their dogs and were in charge all the time and never allowed their dogs to get into situations where something might trigger, the dog to have to act. Will say I trained with one of these Chessie's one time got into a heated interaction with an aggressive stranger at a gas station, Was glad to have that type of dog at that point.
Thanks for your response. I would love referrals for an onsite evaluation. As I mentioned, I'm in northern California but would travel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
[QUOTE="Chris Atkinson, post: 2270374, member: 45243"

The being more exciting to your dog part while stepping off the path and facing away assumes the owner of the other dog realizes you're not interested in letting either dog invade the others' space and will keep on going.
[/QUOTE]
Yea, but in the real world , ass- out -of- u- and - me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,945 Posts
Yes if you were going to use this approach, you would need a willing participant who understands what you are trying to do and can take direction. Then maybe after many times of practice with different dogs, you might be able to implement it on a walk with random dogs/people.

Meredith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,393 Posts
[QUOTE="Chris Atkinson, post: 2270374, member: 45243"

The being more exciting to your dog part while stepping off the path and facing away assumes the owner of the other dog realizes you're not interested in letting either dog invade the others' space and will keep on going.
Yea, but in the real world , ass- out -of- u- and - me
[/QUOTE]
Robert. Your reply has reset me. I was trying to keep out of public training suggestions. Your reply is a perfect example of why I don’t have time or tolerance for it. Thanks for the reminder. Sincerely and seriously.

I have used my advice to this person in the real world. It has worked for me and my dog.

feel free to offer this person some help if you can think of a productive suggestion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,393 Posts
Yes if you were going to use this approach, you would need a willing participant who understands what you are trying to do and can take direction. Then maybe after many times of practice with different dogs, you might be able to implement it on a walk with random dogs/people.

Meredith
Meredith. Is your comment referencing the suggestions I gave?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Please contact Michael Ellis at his school. He is based in Santa Rosa, California, and is considered to be one of the best trainers of dog trainers in the U.S.

He will probably be able to refer you to a reliable, certified trainer who can help you with your dog's issues.

Here is the link to his website: https://michaelellisschool.com/
Thank you!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
First, Sorry for you and dog-- for things. I do know there accouple folks in Norcal area, Linda Harger, Julie Cole, Midwest Gary Kavan , Jerry P (pro) --each with40-50 year experience with your breed (note every person seen training field trial bred chessy, wore heavy leather gloves). My experience with retrievers biting have more to Golden and Blk lab male retrievers, anytime was directed at me, shortly resolve to never happen again. Note regarding blocking , I get it, but it may drive your dog further protective/aggressive mode. I don't recall mentioned that aggression directed at you our other household members. If the primary handler was male or female. Training notes are good for reflection over time. This is a sad topic for me. I helped train a retriever ( puppy to AA), who retired, placed with my brother in law, my newphen was biten by Rowdy, who was put down the next day. I felt as though we failed Rowdy-- left unattended with to be fair -- alittle bugger, his whole life FT ( very successful). This was much more common in the 70s and 80s with retired FT lab s placed in homes. I unfortunately love them all. Remember, nothing happens all at once.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,393 Posts
I’m pretty glad I posted last night because I got to have two great telephone conversations as a result.

This website and the retriever world in general has created some amazing relationships for me. Thanks to all of you.

To the original poster, that was stupid of me to try to envision what’s going on and suggest a solution. Of course, a dog with an aggression problem that’s biting people is nothing to take lightly.

I wish the best for your family and for that dog and hope you get true in person expertise to diagnose and work on the issue. I would start tomorrow or today.

Stay cool everybody!

Good luck, Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,991 Posts
To respond to Tobias and the Colonel - we are using a “balanced” trainer and are using both the prong collar and e-collar.
My Chessy’s behavior issues are distinct depending on the situation. When leashed, he sometimes does not like unleashed dogs coming up to him and he will lunge an snarl. As far as I know, he hasn’t actually bitten a dog. I have stood there and had the owner inspect their dog and even given out my name and number if asked. The mystery to me is that he only does this sometimes. There are dogs who come up to him and literally get in his face and he doesn’t react.
When my Chessy is off-leash, he ignores dogs unless they come up to him. Again, sometimes (not always) he goes after then. Again, no biting just a lot of scary snarling. Since my Chessy is huge, he’s the one on top.
My Chessy has a bite history. Both times he put his mouth over the forearm. He let go when yelled at. And then acts as if nothing happened. The first time, the person didn’t want to show me her arm and walked away. The second time, his teeth didn’t puncture the skin but there were red marks.
Hope this gives you more context. I have also been in touch with CBR for advice. If he can’t be rehabilitated, I am hoping we can re-home him unless experienced trainers tell me we should put him down.
Your dog doesn't sound that bad. there is a method for getting rid of aggression for good,but you can't do it using prongs and chokes. You can't have conflict when working with aggression, I know because I have been doing it for over twenty years.The thought process needs to change and it can't come from the handler/trainer
Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,991 Posts
Have you had a full physical, including a full thyroid panel done on him? Low or out of balance thyroid can cause anxiety and/or aggression and normal onset is around 2 years old.

If you can't "fix" him, you can't re-home him. You would be turning a liability over to someone else to deal with.

Meredith
[/QUOTThere are methods now to eradicate it

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,945 Posts
Good to know Pete! I guess I am basing that statement on the fact that most owners don’t have a clue on what to do (or how to do it), nor do they have access to someone like you to help them fix the issues. So, just handing off a dog with a problem is not a good solution.

I know we would all love to hear how things turn out for this dog and his family.

Meredith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,991 Posts
Good to know Pete! I guess I am basing that statement on the fact that most owners don’t have a clue on what to do (or how to do it), nor do they have access to someone like you to help them fix the issues. So, just handing off a dog with a problem is not a good solution.

I know we would all love to hear how things turn out for this dog and his family.

Meredith
Hopefully some day this method will gain popularity. Most owners and dog trainers don't have a clue about aggression. I didn't either and I worked with aggressive dogs for a long time. Ultimate control on the control commands and management has always been what most aggressive dog trainers could offer. One problem is the handler /trainer is not always with the dog. No handler and the dog makes it's own decision. Now aggressive thoughts can be eliminated from the dogs psychy through behavior modification and not obedience. I'm sure there are a few that can't be eliminated completely but the majority can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,701 Posts
Your dog doesn't sound that bad. there is a method for getting rid of aggression for good,but you can't do it using prongs and chokes. You can't have conflict when working with aggression, I know because I have been doing it for over twenty years.The thought process needs to change and it can't come from the handler/trainer
Pete
I wasn't intimating that the use a prong or choke chain would work in correcting the behavior or changing it. But might be necessary for general basic obedience (not knowing what the dog has been taught or has been expected of it on the home front). Same for the use of an e-collar. Just for general training purposes and to bring balance to the dog's daily life. I should have been more clear on that front. Glad you pointed it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,991 Posts
I wasn't intimating that the use a prong or choke chain would work in correcting the behavior or changing it. But might be necessary for general basic obedience (not knowing what the dog has been taught or has been expected of it on the home front). Same for the use of an e-collar. Just for general training purposes and to bring balance to the dog's daily life. I should have been more clear on that front. Glad you pointed it out.
I know you weren't. I was responding to his second post. The e collar is necessary though. but like everything else you have to know when,why where and how how to apply it.
Simple really but not easy.
Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Hopefully some day this method will gain popularity. Most owners and dog trainers don't have a clue about aggression. I didn't either and I worked with aggressive dogs for a long time. Ultimate control on the control commands and management has always been what most aggressive dog trainers could offer. One problem is the handler /trainer is not always with the dog. No handler and the dog makes it's own decision. Now aggressive thoughts can be eliminated from the dogs psychy through behavior modification and not obedience. I'm sure there are a few that can't be eliminated completely but the majority can.
Pete,
Can we hire you? If not, is there someone you can recommend?
 
21 - 40 of 44 Posts
Top