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The rulebook states

Ability to “mark’’ does not necessarily imply “pinpointing the fall.’’ A dog that misses the “fall’’ on the first cast, but recognizes the depth of the “area of the fall,’’ stays in it, then quickly and systematically “huntsit-out,’’ has done both a creditable and an intelligent job of marking. Such work should not be appreciably out-scored by the dog that “finds’’ or “pinpoints’’ on his first cast.

How do each of you apply this, or see it applied?

Just for discussion purposes.
 

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I write notes about many aspects of a performance but especially hunts. There are “excellent” to “good” to “SOB” hunts. There are wrong side hunts and “hooks”....
 

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This is based strictly on the rule book passage you have referenced.
I totally agree that a dog which executes an intelligent, tight, hunt resulting in recovery of the bird should not be scored appreciatively higher than one that front foots it for the purpose of callbacks.
However, since judging is about comparing the relative performances of the dogs which have completed the trial, the dog with the least graphite on the paper for all the marks has shown itself to be the better marker that day. So, in the end, pin pointing the birds may be very important when it comes to placements. -Paul
 

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This is based strictly on the rule book passage you have referenced.
I totally agree that a dog which executes an intelligent, tight, hunt resulting in recovery of the bird should not be scored appreciatively higher than one that front foots it for the purpose of callbacks.
However, since judging is about comparing the relative performances of the dogs which have completed the trial, the dog with the least graphite on the paper for all the marks has shown itself to be the better marker that day. So, in the end, pin pointing the birds may be very important when it comes to placements. -Paul
Assuming style, line manners, delivery are more or less equal
 

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I am very judicious with a straight line to the bird and M++ when judging marks. ( I only start drawing when the dog gets near the area or they do something weird on the way to the mark. A small tight area hunt I will also give a M++ but will indicate a small tight hunt. Since it is relative, some dogs are pinpoint markers, come up with the bird very fast, with no hunt at all. If they do that 6 or 8 times in a trial, that’s impressive, fun to watch, and an indication of marking talent. Style and delivery are important. Blinds are important as well since they can be the deciding factor between two stellar marking jobs. Style and attention to the handler’s direction are very important.
 

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I've trained a few competitors. Each one is/was different than you and I. Between a PIG and a High Roller what verbs do you use to define plausible STYLE?
 

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I've trained a few competitors. Each one is/was different than you and I. Between a PIG and a High Roller what verbs do you use to define plausible STYLE?
Lots of verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, ETC can be found in the Standard, quoted here.....

(7) "Style is apparent in every movement of a dog
and throughout his entire performance at trials, for
example: by the gaiety of his manner in approaching
the line, by his alertness on-line, by his eagerness and
speed on retrieves, by his water-entry, by his pick-up of
birds and by his return with them. Style makes for a
pleasing performance; together with ability to mark,
they constitute the most important factors for placings in
Derby Stakes.
In all stakes, in respect to “style,’’ a desired
performance includes: (a) an alert and obedient
attitude, (b) a fast-determined departure, both on land
and into the water, (c) an aggressive search for the
“fall,’’ (d) a prompt pick-up, and (e) a reasonably fast
return. Dogs may be credited for outstanding and
brilliant exhibitions of style, or they may be penalized
for deficiencies in style — the severity of the penalty
ranging from a minor demerit, to elimination from the
stake in extreme cases."

I think the Standard spells it out pretty well. Particularly in the second paragraph. - Paul
 

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Between a PIG and a High Roller what verbs do you use to define plausible STYLE?
At a recent derby I wrote 'Entertaining' multiple times on one dogs sheet. The dog did not win but did place and style defiantly played a part in separating her from the pack. She was the most fun to watch and appeared to be having the time of her life, made me laugh every series.
She also had excellent line manners.
 
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