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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i'm in the process of getting a pup (in 3 weeks) and wondering about kennel options and sizes. i know for kennel training you need a kennel that is appropriate for the dogs size or partition off a larger one for the dogs size so he wont use the bathroom in the corner and avoid it.

we plan on borrowing the mother in laws wire kennel while its a pup. its probably 2 feet by 1.5 feet more or less. but we plan on purchasing one soon for when it outgrows that. what size does most everyone buy? ive seen mediums, intermidiates, larges, and extra larges. i know it depends on the size of the pup so background info on the dog is its a male, father is 90 lbs of muscle and mother is 80 pounds of muscle.

i like the ruff tuffs for durability or the remingtons for price. any brand preferences? it will be used for the home and travel to the woods in my 4runner if i have passengers (otherwise he'll be riding in backseat)
 

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You need at least a large or extra large. Someone posted a rule of thumb about age (about 4 months, I think) at which you double the dogs weight to get his full adult size. If you do an internet search on crates, they will give you a size (weight) recommendation for each crate size. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
just in case there was a mixup i plan on getting a wire kennel while its a pup but for long term (and this thread) i plan on the "carrier" style kennels. hard plastic body with one entry way
 

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just in case there was a mixup i plan on getting a wire kennel while its a pup but for long term (and this thread) i plan on the "carrier" style kennels. hard plastic body with one entry way
I use the wire crates in the house with 5 adult dogs. I started with a plastic crate strapped in the back of a pickup for the road. The plastic crates provide no insulation and very little protection from the elements. Dogs get too hot in the summer, too cold in the winter and too wet in the rain. They also offer little protection for the dog and are not secure. Go ahead and invest in a good quality stainless or aluminum dog box. There are some nice products made for use in a van or suv.
 

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Something to think about when purchasing your dog crate. You want a smaller size with movable divider for the puppy stage due to the housebreaking issues as you already mentioned. Good idea to borrow one like this unless you plan on getting a new puppy every couple of years, then buy one and store it when not in use.

If you plan on using a crate in the house over a long period of time (such as going to work,) you'll need a fairly large one so your dog can lay down on it's side and be comfortable in it. 8 hours is a long time to be squeezed into a crate. Wire crates also allow better circulation and are easier to see out of. If your dog likes the security of a more den-like crate, then an enclosed crate would be the way to go.

Crates just for travel in a vehicle are safest when the dog has "just enough" room to lay on it's chest. In case of an accident, you don't want the dog flying around inside the crate. Some people prefer not to use folding crates in the car, because they can fold up on the dog in an accident, but they do allow for excellent ventilation.

My husband has the Zinger brand crates in the back of his truck: it's a full-sized truck with a shell over the bed, lots of room. The dogs love the big crates and they are very comfortable in there at hunt tests or traveling when they spend a lot of time in and basically "live" in the crates.

My little Dodge Durango also has a shell over the bed, but it's a much smaller space, and I do the day-to-day driving with the dogs on errands and to training sites. I have the Ruff-Tuff crates in mine. With their shape (narrow at the bottom,) the dogs have to lay on their chests, but they don't seem to mind. We're much more likely to have traffic incidents in my truck because we're in there every day and driving in town. My dogs are both Chessies, our male is 26 inches at the shoulder and very long front-to-back: he barely fits in the largest kennel they make, has to tuck his paws in.
 

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Get a crate big enough for the adult dog, and save the money of buying multiples. You can divide the crate, put boxes in it, whatever to make it "smaller" I see no reason to buy different size crates. JMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Get a crate big enough for the adult dog, and save the money of buying multiples. You can divide the crate, put boxes in it, whatever to make it "smaller" I see no reason to buy different size crates. JMO
i have no intention at all of buying multiple crates. i am going to borrow the mother in laws smaller crate until he outgrows it and then use the crate i buy based on this discussion.

so i'm thinking i need to go XL in most brands. i looked at the sizing of the other kennels compared to ruff tuff and it seems like its 6 inches shorter than most brands. i'm leaning towards xl remington or the vari kennel 500
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
so 3 months later im still stuck on this. the dog has basically outgrown the mother in laws hand me down wire kennel. he is and has been house broken for awhile so im still trying to figure out the kennel thing. he turned four months old yesterday so based on waynes theory at 35lbs he should be roughly 70lbs full grown. roughly 10-15 less than his father. and about par with his mother.

so im torn between intermediate ruff tuff or large (400) skykennel by petmate (our petco carries it). it will be both an inside the house and transport kennel in my 4runner (although as i type this he lays at my feet in bed so who knows of its extense in house use)

i like the ruff tuff with the acessories tray on top but am concerned about the size. i like the size of the skykennel but not the 2 piece design/wingnuts. any help? i would shell out more for the large ruff tuff but that is a lot of coin for plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
because as warm as it is in the summer it gets pretty cold in the winter too (teens-20's arent uncommon). i can get a door mounted fan for the summer. even if i get a sportdog kennel cover its still gonna be a little more chilly without some form of insulation (be it plastic)


i might also add that we dont use our heat in the house during the winter. house stays around 50-60. electric bill in 30-40 dollar range. layers and blankets are your friend. so having a wire kennel in the house might not be best for him. granted he's covered in fur but judging how he was snuggled up to me and my wifes body heat last night he prolly likes to be warm and cozy

i guess my final point would also be that so often i read or hear about a dogs natural den instincts. its kind of hard to have a den when i can see through the walls. i want his kennel to be something he can retreat to and relax. not stare at whats going on all around him while he's inside
 

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I can't state how much I love my Ruff Tough Kennel. I have the large and its shorter size actually fits my dogs great. They can stand up and not hit shoulders on top, can turn around easily, and plenty of room to lie down. For traveling in the winter, in South Dakota, I just throw on an insulated kennel cover, if really cold will throw on an old blanket.
 

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If you're using it in the car, the Ruff Tuff is going to be much safer for your dog than the PetMate. I love my Ruff Tuff kennels. My male chessie is 26 inches at the shoulder and around 72 lbs: he can walk in and turn around easily.
 
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