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Is there a "standard" between the two commands? I have taught neither as of yet, and am trying to see the significance to field usage. Shall I use the actual kennel and the kennel command then substitute with a place board?

I've read and watched where people use the kennel as a way to "send" the dog away, but when the kennel is actually gone, what identifies the place/kennel?

Thanks in advance,

Paul
 

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I use both "kennel" and "place."

Kennel is A kennel, specifically. I crate my dogs to eat and ride in the car; when I want them in kennels for that purpose, I say "kennel." It is always an actual crate. There is rarely distance involved, except for their house crates which never move. The dogs can get to those kennels from anywhere in the house. They get fed there, they KNOW where their crates are!

Place is a more general command. I use it for dog beds in the house, the pause table in agility, a bath mat for portable dog parking, and platforms for field work. Getting to the platform from a distance is similar to blinds: run in the direction I point you until you find something platform-y.

In practice I don't think it really matters, this is what works for me and my dogs. I taught the commands separately, I used a bath mat from the start for Place.

Generally speaking, the two things that tell the dog when he has reached the Place is a change in texture and in height. For example, consider a wooden pallet on a grassy field. It is wood vs. grass and raised about 3 inches. An actual pallet is much too big, but it illustrates the concept. Particularly something raised with an edge helps the dog get the idea in the beginning, once he has it you can use something like rubber mat and he'll still understand.
 

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I find "kennel" to be a very useful command. I use it to mean 1) get into your crate in the house 2) get into the car/truck 3) get into the boat. I use the command "table" to mean get up on any platform for example the force table or the scale in the vet's office. It shouldn't be too hard to add a mat to the meaning of "table". I think that they are both useful commands.
 

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I use both. They are close in meaning. Out in the field I use place when I do stand alone retrieves and send him back, he goes to the mat on the place command. I also use place for the table in agility. Kennel means in the truck either in his kennel or on the seat in the front of the truck. In the house I use the word blanket to get on the mat. What ever you use be consistent and teach him first so he will get used to the command you give.
 

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Kennel helps in the field if you are using a dog blind, dog box attached to a blind, or dog box on the end of a pit. To my dogs, kennel means get in something.
 

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I use kennel to get the dogs in the holding blinds at tests/trials and to get into a dog blind for hunting. At home it means get in the crate, go inside, go outside (basically go through the door). I don't use "place" or place boards. I use "sit" to get the dog to sit in a certain place.
 

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I use both. They are close in meaning. Out in the field I use place when I do stand alone retrieves and send him back, he goes to the mat on the place command. I also use place for the table in agility. Kennel means in the truck either in his kennel or on the seat in the front of the truck. In the house I use the word blanket to get on the mat. What ever you use be consistent and teach him first so he will get used to the command you give.
Me too. If i used kennel on a stand alone, they'd head for the truck :)
 

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I just use "kennel". They figure out the what/where given the context we're in. ;-)
 

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Me too. If i used kennel on a stand alone, they'd head for the truck :)
x2 they'd head straight for the truck from a very long distance, probably cross a creek and the Highway, if they survived that they'd stay in the truck until I arrived, however long that took. Got to be careful with that Kennel command ;)
 

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Guess I use mutiple commands and never gave it a thought.

Command & Meaning
Kennel: Go to one in the yard kennel fence or house kennel box
Load Up: Get in the back of the pickup
Go ta truck: Head to the truck and load in the back
Go ta boat: Get in da boat
Place: Go to the mat that was placed and shown you prior

Just what I do.....Duckdon

All carry the same outcome, that is to go there now and stay until I tell you different.
 

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I use both as well "Kennel" means get in truck, crate, pen...

"Place" is go to your dog blind, stand, spot in pit blind, spot on boat.... When ever he hears place he knows that means go to your hunting spot
 

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I use both as well "Kennel" means get in truck, crate, pen...

"Place" is go to your dog blind, stand, spot in pit blind, spot on boat.... When ever he hears place he knows that means go to your hunting spot
X2..............
 
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