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Looking for some methods on how to work heel with a pup that pulls, and just overall leash manners? I've tried treats, the stop light game, stoping and turning back around when she pulls. She's only 4 months but already pulling my arm out of my socket anytime I try to take her for a walk. If she's pulling so hard I really want to work on this first before I start working on heel.

I've tried Wolter's method of pulling her back and repeating heel but I have no real response. Barely any response in the yard and she always gets just a bit too in front of my for the heel.
 

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I usually start puppies on leashes as babies, very short sessions and I also shamelessly use treats, high value stuff like cut up hot dogs in very small pieces they can swallow while moving, to give them the idea to walk beside me tractably at heel. Only ever had one "problem dog" and she was a big strong Ches. female that was about 50 lbs. by 4 mos. She drug me around like a sled dog, no amount of stopping/changing direction seemed to work. She actually started pulling in puppy kindergarten. That class was taught by a clickers n treats type instructor who didn't even want us to use choke collars, never mind prong collars! For this young thug, the answer was a prong collar; we just didn't wear it in that class. It works like a charm, instant compliance! But I did repeat the lessons to be sure she understood. I also used a Delmar Smith wonder lead on this same dog when she needed occasional reminders. The wonder lead is useful if you live in a neighborhood where the do gooders view the prong collar as a medieval torture device.
 

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I usually start puppies on leashes as babies, very short sessions.
She was responsive to the leash and even small tugs on the collar would make her stop and look back but it's like a light switched on(off? Maybe) and any response to the tugs have gone out the window almost overnight and now is pulling like crazy. I have nothing against prong collars but I hope I can get some methods so I can hopefully not have to use one right now.
 

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If you don't want to go prong collar route, try running the leash down its back and loop it around the stomach and back under the leash up to your hand.

hopefully I explained that well. It works great, just give it a tug and the dog quickly responds.

i have had good luck with it, but sometimes a pup will throw a temper tantrum and start rolling over and biting at the leash the first couple times.

The prong collar works great though, and may need to go that route for other obedience drills (sit).
 

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Looking for some methods on how to work heel with a pup that pulls, and just overall leash manners? I've tried treats, the stop light game, stoping and turning back around when she pulls. She's only 4 months but already pulling my arm out of my socket anytime I try to take her for a walk. If she's pulling so hard I really want to work on this first before I start working on heel.

I've tried Wolter's method of pulling her back and repeating heel but I have no real response. Barely any response in the yard and she always gets just a bit too in front of my for the heel.
I've had good luck with backward heeling at feeding time. I usually start with puppies that have to sit before being released for each meal. Then progress to having them have to sit at the heel position before being released for breakfast or dinner. Then progress to having them move backwards with me to sit at the heel position. Then I start introducing the heel command and typically they fly back to the heal position and are released for feeding. Twice a day, that's 120 times in 2 months and food is a great motivator.
 

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I believe the ecollar has tremendous value in teaching "heel". Unlike choke chains or prong collars, ther is no "resentment" (not quite the right word, but it's late). The dog makes the decision to walk where you want him rather than being jerked into position.
As always, start on the lowest setting the dog can feel with the dog on a leash to help him learn how to be successful.
 

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I have always used a prong collar to teach walking at heel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've had good luck with backward heeling at feeding time. I usually start with puppies that have to sit before being released for each meal. Then progress to having them have to sit at the heel position before being released for breakfast or dinner. Then progress to having them move backwards with me to sit at the heel position. Then I start introducing the heel command and typically they fly back to the heal position and are released for feeding. Twice a day, that's 120 times in 2 months and food is a great motivator.
Wow I really like this idea to get her into the right position. She's already sitting and waiting to be released so I'm going to implement this and see how that goes. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've heard of using the ecollar for heel but isn't that used when the dog already has an idea of what heel is? She's been CC to sit and working on 'here'. I'm new to this so can you explain how to implement the ecollar for 'teaching' heel instead of reinforcing it? Thank you :)
 

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If you don't want to go prong collar route, try running the leash down its back and loop it around the stomach and back under the leash up to your hand.

hopefully I explained that well. It works great, just give it a tug and the dog quickly responds.

i have had good luck with it, but sometimes a pup will throw a temper tantrum and start rolling over and biting at the leash the first couple times.

The prong collar works great though, and may need to go that route for other obedience drills (sit).
I will give this a try, in all honesty I use the prong collar as a last resort type of tool. Not because it looks 'cruel' or because my dogs don't like them but simply because the ones I've used are so irritating to put on lol. I used a prong collar on my golden and I almost threw the thing out the window trying to add/remove the links.
 

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There is a puppy nylon prong collar that is very useful. I have used it with great success. In addition to this, I used what I call the Morgan Spector Drill for dogs that are constant forgers, exactly what you have.
 

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I see a lot of people do this (put on prong collar by opening the collar). Easiest, no-fuss way is to flip over the collar so the prongs face outward, slip it on, flip over again. Voila!
 

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If you don't want to go prong collar route, try running the leash down its back and loop it around the stomach and back under the leash up to your hand.

hopefully I explained that well. It works great, just give it a tug and the dog quickly responds.

i have had good luck with it, but sometimes a pup will throw a temper tantrum and start rolling over and biting at the leash the first couple times.

The prong collar works great though, and may need to go that route for other obedience drills (sit).
Here is an example. http://youtu.be/tc_sJJ04tPA

I did this recently with my 5 month old and after one time of having the leash cinch around her flank, she was no longer pulling. I don't think I would go on a super long walk with the leash like this, but I use it when the reminders to not pull don't work.
 

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Simplest way to get rid of a forger is to use a short leash and when they step in front of you, pivot on your foot nearest the dog to make a 90 degree turn, lift your outside knee and bump them in the cheek as you walk right through the dog. Be gentle at first and increase the "bump" as you need in order to get the dog looking for you. Also, do not make a single sound. It needs to come out of nowhere so they learn to stay in position and watch for you to turn. One week of two walks a day and it should be over. Works great with a prong collar but it also works with a flat collar or harness.
 

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I will give this a try, in all honesty I use the prong collar as a last resort type of tool. Not because it looks 'cruel' or because my dogs don't like them but simply because the ones I've used are so irritating to put on lol. I used a prong collar on my golden and I almost threw the thing out the window trying to add/remove the links.
Me too. Fixed it with vice-grips.
 

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If you don't want to go prong collar route, try running the leash down its back and loop it around the stomach and back under the leash up to your hand.

hopefully I explained that well. It works great, just give it a tug and the dog quickly responds.

i have had good luck with it, but sometimes a pup will throw a temper tantrum and start rolling over and biting at the leash the first couple times.

The prong collar works great though, and may need to go that route for other obedience drills (sit).

If you do this, you will find it works very well.

I have showed this to 100 lb little old ladies that were being dragged around by 80 lb adult dogs. They had control of the dog within minutes.-Paul
 

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Using the above method works great/
It is not widely used but works.
You still have the a loop around the neck but the loop around the stomach gives you the control.
It takes very little pressure to get a positive result.
I have shown this method to many pet owners who just want their dogs to heel.
Good luck
 

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I followed the Tom Dokken method and use choke chain leash have to be sure you have it on right pressure on / off so when doing right pressure is released. You start with one step at a time and progress from there worked for me so far but my pup is pretty biddable and listens well even as a pup. One keys too is I started way before 4 months old started at 1 month old gently Some say you can start after or at FF after dog learns pressure on/off is all about though you should be doing that in various ways in young pups
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