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Here's a letter I am going to have published in some club newsletters.

Me, AKC and DNA

I decided to write this article after a situation that occurred with me trying to comply with the Frequently Used Sire Program instituted by AKC a few years ago. That program (for those not familiar) is a DNA requirement for stud dogs that sire more than 3 litters in a calendar year or 7 in a lifetime.

As a matter of routine, I usually will DNA my males upon getting their health clearances (OFA,CERF etc). Most of the time, my males have not even been bred before the DNA gets sent in. Its just one of those things I like to be proactive about.

Last July, I sampled two of my males. Now I have to admit, timing was terrible as I was in the process of moving. So as you can imagine, I had a lot on my mind.

With my son helping, I sampled Bandit and Chill. These dogs are both out of the same female, but have different sires.

I collected the samples and sent them in to AKC. In August I received Chill’s DNA certificate back. Two weeks later I received Bandit’s DNA certificate back. Now the AKC puts a form letter in with the DNA certificates. The percentage of people that actually read this letter is likely to be in the low numbers especially after having received the first few that you do. However, upon looking at Bandit’s letter, I noticed it didn’t look quite like the normal letter you get with the certificates. Upon further attention, I noticed this letter was quite unlike any letter I had gotten before. Actually, to put it frankly, it scared the heck out of me. It stated that Bandit’s DNA sample had two exclusions and would need further testing.

Now after reading the letter I got with Bandit’s DNA certificate, I called AKC and immediately wanted to send in another sample. I figured with all that was going on, I had contaminated the sample somehow with either another dog’s DNA or dogfood or something. The person I spoke with at AKC said to wait until the further testing was completed.

For those that don’t know, one exclusion is allowed but two are not. Upon further testing, two more exclusions popped up. I was panicked. I had no males on my place, and the breeding that produced Bandit was an artificial insemination preformed by a veterinarian.

After receiving another very scary letter in October from the AKC, I spoke with the same individual in the DNA department. She was very helpful. I told her I wanted to resubmit a sample immediately for Bandit. I told her I had sampled two dogs at the same time and that I thought I might have cross contaminated the samples. She then looked up the other dog’s sample and noticed that Chill had one exclusion. I asked her how common exclusions were and she could not tell me. I had her look up the other dogs I had sampled in the past and NONE had any exclusions. So that told me that even Chill’s sample wasn’t normal. I asked the gal to cross compare the dogs which she did. Bandit’s sample matched Chill’s sire with no exclusions and Chill’s sample matched Bandit’s sire with no exclusions. So it seems a simple case of mislabeling occurred.

Simple to fix right?? Not so.

I then was referred to a case manager. I ordered a new kit to sample only Bandit (on her recommendation) and then we waited for the results again. This was November and this had already been dragging on in my opinion.

First week of December came and I called to see how the progress was going on Bandit’s new DNA sample. AKC had no record of receiving it. Fortunately, I had sent it Express Mail and we tracked it down. Now it was still going to be 5 weeks for the new results.

I called every week until the results were in. The third week of January and guess what? Not enough cheek cells to get a DNA profile from the sample.

By the first week of February, the third sample was on its way to the AKC. It took that sample until the mid-March to get the results back. All was cleared, I had in fact mis-labeled the samples. A simple case and it took 8 months to clear up.

So here’s my problem. If this DNA program is something the AKC really believes in, why are we not required to send in DNA samples with pups when we either register the litter or register the individual pups?

What would happen if you have a dog that is bred say 6 times over his first 10 years of life? Then he produces a son that is a wonder dog and is bred 200 times. Then the original sire gets bred his 7th time requiring a DNA sample to be on file and he is proven NOT to be the offspring of his sire of record. So all of this dog’s get including wonder dog and wonder dog’s get and their get are excluded from being able to be registered until the sire is found for Wonder Dog’s sire.. You could potentially have hundreds even thousands of pups that are not registerable. Why wait until there is a HUGE problem when requiring the DNA tests on pups would eliminate any such enormous mess such as this? Think this hasn’t happened or isn’t likely to happen? Wrong again. Read up on the AKC reports and you will find a Golden Retriever breeder who is currently trying to settle such an issue with a stud dog she has bred over 100 times and is looking at over 1000 Golden Retriever puppies getting their AKC registration revoked.

Lee Salmon
Wind River Labs
 

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I had a situation where if the pups had been required to have a DNA I would be alot better off.

Years ago I bought a Female pup from a back yard breeder in Baton Rouge. The pup took off and honestly has been the easiest dog I have ever trained. (All 4 of them) Anyway when I bought Jax they had two litters and had mixxed them. I hesitated on sending Jax's registration in and continued training her and ran her in a few picnic tests.

Eventually we moved to Utah. I ran her and passed her in 2 senior tests. I had mailed the registration in and was waiting on the certificate but entered her anyway. Our club secretary knew that the registration was on the way and said I would be fine running her without the AKC # for a couple of weeks.

Well I get notice from AKC that Jax registration is declined and that there is nothing I can do. I called AKC to see what the problem was and found out that the breeder had mixxed the litters and DNA would have to be done to get registration. I tried and tried to contact the backyard breeder and no luck. So now I have Jax who is still a great family dog and one hell of a hunting dog that is not registered. She has "unofficially passed 2 senoir tests" and is a great family member. We dont love her any less and she still gets out and trains and hunts and I run her in all the picnic tests, but we got screwed!

Running DNA on all pups before would demand that pups sell for a higher price, but it would have saved us 9 years ago. Needless to say I have since learned and avoid backyard bandits.

Sorry for my [email protected]!
 

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This actually happened in the pointing dog game a few yrs ago. The dog that won the National Ch was not out of the dog he was said to be. It caused a big stink. All his wins were void and all offspring wins were voided. It finally got straightend out I think but it took a while and a few people got suspended and alot of bad blood. Glad I got out of that game.
 

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I know a guy that AKC's dna rule helped him find out a litter had been registered to his stud even though he had never heard of the dog or the owner. His name had been forged on the litter app. He has now turned it over to the sheriff. At least one of the resulting pups(now 4 yrs old) has also been bred, so two generations have lost their registration.
 
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