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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My buddy is looking hard at the new A5. Anyone own one and/or have any info on how they are so far?

Thanks, Danny
 

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the new Browning A 5 only shares the model number with the classic humpback, those that own the classic version will testify that the two will never be mistaken for one another
 

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the new Browning A 5 only shares the model number with the classic humpback, those that own the classic version will testify that the two will never be mistaken for one another

I definitely agree with Bon Mallari without a doubt. In my opinion just to much history to overcome, so to say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the new Browning A 5 only shares the model number with the classic humpback, those that own the classic version will testify that the two will never be mistaken for one another
Yea, he's aware that the gun is only similar aesthetically but was kind of liking the new recoil system and some of the other upgrades. I know it has not been on the market very log, that's why I was looking for feedback from those who own them or are familiar with how they are working out so far. My only 2 comments to him were they have only been out a year and they're a 3" gun not 3.5 (if it matters to him)

Danny
 

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The New A5 has the same hump back design as the original, but as Bon said that is where the similarities end. The new one has a completely different gas system. With that said I have a friend that is a browning rep and he absolutely loves the new A5
 

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A friend of mine is a die hard hump back collector with 40+ at anyone time. He shoot the new version not too long ago and really liked it. To use his words, "it's lighter and kicks less, what's not too like?". I had no idea what he was talking about but he also mendioned that adjusting the gas mechanism on the new version would be much easier to fine tune.
 

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The New A5 has the same hump back design as the original, but as Bon said that is where the similarities end. The new one has a completely different gas system. With that said I have a friend that is a browning rep and he absolutely loves the new A5
I know the old one wasn't gas operated. I don't think the new one is either. I think it uses a kinetic system.

Are they out on the market yet?
 

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A friend of mine is a die hard hump back collector with 40+ at anyone time. He shoot the new version not too long ago and really liked it. To use his words, "it's lighter and kicks less, what's not too like?". I had no idea what he was talking about but he also mentioned that adjusting the gas mechanism on the new version would be much easier to fine tune.
the old A5 was inertia (recoil) driven, they were carved out of solid steel, extremely reliable, and almost jam proof.They handled everything from light loads to heavier magnums, no adjustment needed, plus they were a true Browning...as much as I prefer to shoot a Remington gas operated 1100, I appreciate the classic design and craftmanship of the older A5 and also the fact that they have withstood the test of time and are still in use to this day, probably by many here on the RTF
 

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My husband wants to trade in his beneli for it. He has the older A5 and its a great gun.
Cyndi, that's interesting because I went the opposite way. Didn't like the Browning at all especially when the weather turned cold. Absolutely love my Benelli but have now gone completely away from the auto and into the over/unders
 

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the old A5 was inertia (recoil) driven, they were carved out of solid steel, extremely reliable, and almost jam proof.They handled everything from light loads to heavier magnums, no adjustment needed, plus they were a true Browning...as much as I prefer to shoot a Remington gas operated 1100, I appreciate the classic design and craftmanship of the older A5 and also the fact that they have withstood the test of time and are still in use to this day, probably by many here on the RTF

They did indeed require an adjustment! They required you to chnge the "friction Rings" location,, and how is was placed in reference to a bevel macined on the ring...


http://www.browning.com/customerservice/qna/detail.asp?id=105

If Browning has Changed this Pain in the arse method of adusting for light to heavy loads,, they have REALLY improved the design. IMHO it will make the gun much nicer to own... So many guys get confused, or forget they have that ring installed for light loads,, then shoot heavy loads through it (the gun will still function) and then Damage occurs..


Plus ,, I assume the New A-5 will shoot steel??
You shouldnt in the old ones.

Gooser
 

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I am a HUGE beretta fan..

They are just plain bullet proof.
THOSE guns will cycle ANTHING from extreamly light reloads to 3 Inch monsters..

I was very interested when Browning brought back the A5
Here is a review I found when thinking about one for myself...

Notice the discussion that you no longer have to worry about those pain in the arse Friction rings..

http://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/browning-auto-5-gun-review/


Gooser
 

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They did indeed require an adjustment! They required you to change the "friction Rings" location,, and how is was placed in reference to a bevel machined on the ring...




Gooser
Never knew about those , nice to learn something new each day :cool:
 

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I've owned 2 A5's the first was a sweet 16 with a Belgium barrel the other was a light 12 with a Japaneses barrel I loved them both I have a Benelli now. I heard Benelli was making the new A5 not sure if that's true.
 

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They did indeed require an adjustment! They required you to chnge the "friction Rings" location,, and how is was placed in reference to a bevel macined on the ring...


http://www.browning.com/customerservice/qna/detail.asp?id=105

If Browning has Changed this Pain in the arse method of adusting for light to heavy loads,, they have REALLY improved the design. IMHO it will make the gun much nicer to own... So many guys get confused, or forget they have that ring installed for light loads,, then shoot heavy loads through it (the gun will still function) and then Damage occurs..
The friction rings aren't a pain in the arse, ya just gotta pay attention to your weapon. Nowadays, the average shooter takes the owner's manual, stuffs it in a drawer and uses WD-40 as a lubricant. I change the rings in my Light 12 and Sweet 16 twice a year coinciding with the changes in the seasons; shooting season and hunting season. The Magnum stays with my Dad who has it set for hunting loads with the Hastings barrel set in place and the original barrel kept in mint condition in his safe.

Simple stuff really, and here is how simple. Last fall I had the dogs at a tower shoot and we were coming up to the hot station. A young fella comes up and tells me that the shotgun his Dad gave him wasn't ejecting. I told him to switch the friction rings which was met by a quizzical look. Phone in hand, he tells me that's what his Dad said to do. I took the shotgun and the shooting started:

Check for empty magazine.
Pull bolt back, and check for empty chamber.
Luke!
Depress barrel and remove cap.
Tess! Take bird from Luke.
Remove forearm and barrel.
Luke! Take bird from Tess.
Slip off friction rings, and reset.
Tess! Take bird from Luke.
Set barrel back in place.
Luke! Take bird from Tess.
Replace forearm.
Tess! Take bird from Luke.
Depress barrel and replace cap.
Luke! Take bird from Tess.
Luke returns, take bird from Luke.
Release bolt, check for function.
Hand back to owner and finish the station.
Luke! Tess!
End of station.

It's not rocket science.
 

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I've owned 2 A5's the first was a sweet 16 with a Belgium barrel the other was a light 12 with a Japaneses barrel I loved them both I have a Benelli now. I heard Benelli was making the new A5 not sure if that's true.
Highly doubtful. While the Browning site doesn't mention place of manufacture, the new A5 will either be made by Miroku or in Belgium.
 
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