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Our local news has had several stories on a Maryland company that has developed a new canine heritage DNA test that can determine breed composition of mutts. The company, MetaMorphix (also developed the pedigree DNA test AKC uses), says it can identify 38 different breeds from a cheek swab. The test will be available to the public in about a month, according to the press information.

Hmmm....wonder if silver Lab breeders are quaking in their boots?


http://www.k9magazine.com/viewarticle.php?sid=15&aid=1796

http://www.metamorphixinc.com/products3.html
 

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If they can't differentiate a dogs DNA from a wolf how are they going to tell the breeds apart? Sounds like bullpuckey.
 

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Are you planning on giving the test to your breeding stock?

If the test shows 6, 8 or 10 generations back a dog with 25% something else was bred into your line are you going to contact AKC and have your registration rescinded? Would anyone contact everyone they sold a pup to and return their money?

Can of worms!!!
 

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I hope it isn't BS. I'd love to see the % of Rottweiler in some of the Show "Labs"!

:twisted: :twisted: :twisted:
 

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Here's the 38 breeds they will initially cover:
Afghan Hound
Akita
Basenji
Basset Hound
Beagle
Belgian Tervuren
Bernese Mountain Dog
Border Collie
Borzoi
Boxer
Bulldogs
Chihuahua
Chinese Shar-Pei
Chow chow
Cocker Spaniel
Collie
Dachshund
Doberman Pinscher
English Setter
German Shepherd Dog
German Shorthaired Pointer
Golden Retriever
Greyhounds
Italian Greyhound
Labrador Retriever
Mastiff
Miniature Schnauzer
Poodle
Pug
Rottweiler
Saluki
Samoyed
Shetland Sheepdog
Shih Tzu
Siberian Husky
St Bernard
Whippet
Yorkshire Terrier


If they can't differentiate a dogs DNA from a wolf how are they going to tell the breeds apart? Sounds like bullpuckey.
I believe the term is progress.
 

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subroc said:
If the test shows 6, 8 or 10 generations back a dog with 25% something else was bred into your line are you going to contact AKC and have your registration rescinded? Would anyone contact everyone they sold a pup to and return their money?
It doesn't work like that. Dogs have 78 chromosomes, getting 39 from each parent. At the sixth generation, they inherit _on_average_ 1/64 of the genetic makeup from each ancestor, or _on_average_ about one chromosome. Because of the way chromosomes are reshuffled in breeding, though, farther back than the parents there is no way of knowing how much, if anything, a given individual contributed to your dog. In principle it is possible for a grandparent (2nd generation) to have contributed nothing. It is *probable* that one or more dogs in the sixth generation contributed nothing.

There are also spontaneous mutations. I know someone who had a mismatch at one locus on the DNA profile of a puppy she bred. The other 9 1/2 matched, and the AKC or whoever was responsible certified parentage on the puppy. She contacted them and they said they inferred the mismatch was the result of a mutation.

Amy Dahl
 

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afdahl said:
subroc said:
If the test shows 6, 8 or 10 generations back a dog with 25% something else was bred into your line are you going to contact AKC and have your registration rescinded? Would anyone contact everyone they sold a pup to and return their money?
It doesn't work like that. Dogs have 78 chromosomes, getting 39 from each parent. At the sixth generation, they inherit _on_average_ 1/64 of the genetic makeup from each ancestor, or _on_average_ about one chromosome. Because of the way chromosomes are reshuffled in breeding, though, farther back than the parents there is no way of knowing how much, if anything, a given individual contributed to your dog. In principle it is possible for a grandparent (2nd generation) to have contributed nothing. It is *probable* that one or more dogs in the sixth generation contributed nothing.

There are also spontaneous mutations. I know someone who had a mismatch at one locus on the DNA profile of a puppy she bred. The other 9 1/2 matched, and the AKC or whoever was responsible certified parentage on the puppy. She contacted them and they said they inferred the mismatch was the result of a mutation.

Amy Dahl
Thanks Amy

Over the years your information has been a great learning experience.

This is another case.

Thanks Again

Joe Miano
 
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