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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I promise I tried searching for this info first! :)

"Sit" is a quick, short, strong toot. But what do people use for "Come-in"? I'm looking forward to seeing different phonetic interpretations :)

Thanks!
 

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"Sit" can be a quick, short burst or a single, loooonnngggg, burst depending on the distance between you and the dog and whether or not the dog is sitting quickly to the whistle. Come in is 2 quick "tweet, tweets" or several quick tweets if bringing the dog back to a bird they have over run, usually with one or both arms held down at a 45 degree angle in the direction you want the dog to come back.
 

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Okay, I somehow feel compelled to answer this question...

A come in or "here" whistle is a series of short quick, short toots! Usually it consists of 4-5 short whistle beeps from me. As a puppy progresses in his learning at a young age I use the "here" whistle to sound excited at his coming and to get him excited about coming in. I also praise him good when he complies.

BHB
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, guys! I have Hillman's DVD and what you're describing is what I seem to observe him doing in the DVD. But I wanted to be sure I have it right before I started practicing this for several months only to discover that I'm way off. Thanks again. Just needed a pat on the back and "you're doing it right"!

And thanks for the description of different contexts.
 

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In all reality I don't think it matter what you use. As long as you're consistent with the application the dogs learn what the different sounds mean pretty quickly.

I rarely use a "here" whistle in while running marks except as BHB describes with a pup. With a more experienced dog, they don't need a whistle or "here" command to bring the duck back to me.
 

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My "here" whistle used to be all over the map. Then I went to a Mitch White seminar and took away two ideas that I have started using.

1) No need to whistle the dog to you after he picks up the mark or blind and is coming toward you anyway. It's a wasted whistle and can be construed as nagging.
2) My "here" whistle is now three short toots with hard stops on the end of each. Imagine saying "Come. Here. Now." while blowing the whistle.

Bonus idea) Blow with decreased sound volume when the dog is close to you and increased sound volume when the dog is further away. Blowing a lung full of air at a dog 20 yards away is like holding a conversation with one person talking and the other yelling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Again, thanks. Obviously, I need to practice my technique as much or more than he needs to learn the signal - probably true for many training principles. I notice that when I try to blow with lower force, there's a fine line where I get a variable-pitched rumble rather than a tweet or toot. Kinda like your breakpoint in singing. So, will practice: volume; and Come. Here. Now. I find it really helpful to have something like that as a guide. Thanks!
 
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