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"Not a team player" is a phrase I hear from time to time.

What is your definition?

Training and/or genetic reasons? Dog too wild?
 

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I have two dogs. One is a Miniature Schnauzer, the other is a Duck Toller. My main sport is agility.

Gatsby (Schnauzer) was in training for two years, and still has not seen (and likely never will) a trial. He liked agility. He knew all the obstacles. But he can't take direction. He'd be with me for the first three obstacles, then bail on me to go jump off the top of the A-frame. Or go sniff where the horses pooped (and not stress sniffing, either). He has additional issues (a low threshold for environmental stimulus and general dislike of bustle) that preclude him enjoying competition, and I'm not going to waste my money on entry fees for a dog that doesn't want to be there, but Gatsby is not a team player.

Marsh trained for two months before his first trial, six months after he came to live with me. From the first run, I could tell he A) understood how the game of agility is played, and B) that we play it as a team. He connects with me and stays connected even when we're running in different directions, and is willing to follow my lead (although I'm not convinced Marsh can't just read the numbers). If I had to quantify it, I'd say it's willing to take direction, but I think it's more than that. I may not be able to name it, but I know it when I see it. It's about that connection, a line of attention that goes both ways.
 

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I have two dogs. One is a Miniature Schnauzer, the other is a Duck Toller. My main sport is agility.

Gatsby (Schnauzer) was in training for two years, and still has not seen (and likely never will) a trial. He liked agility. He knew all the obstacles. But he can't take direction. He'd be with me for the first three obstacles, then bail on me to go jump off the top of the A-frame. Or go sniff where the horses pooped (and not stress sniffing, either). He has additional issues (a low threshold for environmental stimulus and general dislike of bustle) that preclude him enjoying competition, and I'm not going to waste my money on entry fees for a dog that doesn't want to be there, but Gatsby is not a team player.

Marsh trained for two months before his first trial, six months after he came to live with me. From the first run, I could tell he A) understood how the game of agility is played, and B) that we play it as a team. He connects with me and stays connected even when we're running in different directions, and is willing to follow my lead (although I'm not convinced Marsh can't just read the numbers). If I had to quantify it, I'd say it's willing to take direction, but I think it's more than that. I may not be able to name it, but I know it when I see it. It's about that connection, a line of attention that goes both ways.
I agree.. and a dog that understands you and hope that you don't let the dog down.:)
 

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It can be either. It's situational. Though some pedigree's have a predisposition for bidability.

Angie
 

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I would also call it biddability. The willingness of a dog to work with their handler. If you have to spend most of your time trying to get your dog's attention, you aren't having fun or productive training sessions. I've had these discussions with other trainers before. I think you can take a dog with less raw talent, but very biddable and go a lot farther with them than you can with a dog that has a ton of raw talent, but doesn't want to work with you. In HT, they list Style as dog's willingness to work with their handler. They should probably just change the name to biddability and most judges would understand that part of the scoring better.

Dawn
 
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