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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious if older dogs, like people, can develop prostate issues? What are the symptoms?

I have an almost 9 year old male that seems to have to urinate more often and for longer durations than in the past. It has been a gradual change as opposed to overnight. Had him to the vet a month ago, wondering if it could be a uti. They put him on an antibiotic for 10 days and no real change.

He has trouble making it through the night these days, without having to go out and once outside, he may pee for 5 minutes... Just a dribble, but still trying to go. Unfortunately, I haven't had a dog live past 9 yet, so am not all that familiar with the health issues of older dogs. Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Yes, it is common when they get older. The vet should do a rectal exam to check. I have all my males checked when they are older. It can be very uncomfortable for them if it becomes infected, but the symptoms he is having could be that it is enlarged. I have a repro vet but I assume regular vets will do the exam too. If not, find a repro vet. One of my studs got prostatitis when he was about 8 and he received antibiotics and then 1/2 Ovaban a month kept it under control past the age of 14.
 

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Thanks for the advice Nancy. I did deal with it in one of my dogs with no success. I'll keep in mind your suggestion of a repro vet and ovaban.

Dan the symptoms you describe sound much like my old guy.

Good Luck,

Angie
 

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http://www.m.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/dog-prostate-problems?page=1

Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) in dogs is common but often not symptomatic. In dogs the prostate does not completely surround the urethra as it does in humans hence difficult urination is not a typical problem.

There are a number of other possible causes for your dog's urination issues. He may be drinking more water and hence producing more urine. Common causes are aging kidneys, Cushing's Disease, and diabetes mellitus. Another problem is a degenerative neuropathy of the nerves supplying the urinary bladder and urethra which can be caused by lumbosacral stenosis.

Minimum diagnostic testing includes a rectal exam to assess prostate size, a urinalysis including urine specific gravity, a biochemistry blood profile and CBC, and abdominal X-rays of the caudal abdomen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Excellent info. Thanks Dr. Ed! I' ll make another appt. for the older guy.
 
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