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Obviously impacted by the order the birds go down, but I have come to the conclusion that I still have a lot to learn about being a better handler. Had pretty much always subscribed and trained to the standard selection theories, Primary and Secondary. Then after reading several articles, especially the September 2010 Retriever News article written by Dave Rorem, I became intrigued by his idea of "Ideal Selection". Maybe the next shortest bird down was not the best order to pick up the birds for all dogs. We own a high rolling female out of Cosmo and a Lean Mac bitch. After rerunning all her failed setups of recent(in my mind), most of them were big hunts and/or handles on the longest bird in the setup that I chose to pick up last. She is a pin point singles marker and what I consider an above average marker on multiples. No head swinging issues. Just a good solid marker. In training I have started selecting the longest mark remaining after the go-bird with good success so far. Not sure this will work with every dog and situations may dictate different order of pick up.

What are your thoughts on selection and are they the same with all your dogs?
 

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Most of my dogs', (if left up to their own device), would want to run as mentioned, outside, outside , in. I know Primary Selection isn't very popular, (and not a good idea if you're gonna' test).

To teach it, you can't let the dog select on his own, and also the dog can certainly wind up somewhat short in the marking/memory department if it's done exclusively without any traditional marking concepts.

But having Primary Selection as an option has proven to be a good thing for me afield in huntin' situations that beg for it..Not all marks will be picked up in traditional order, and sometimes you'll push the dog past the go bird to a cripple..And cripples are a priority for me.
 
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