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I have a 2.5 year old male black lab that over the last year has developed a horrible over excitement problem when we are in the field. Last year was his first year in the field. Dove season he was rock steady, quiet as can be and picked up around 300 dove with zero issues. Towards the end of last duck season he developed a very very minor whining problem (I know, probably should have nipped it in the butt there). The whining was the high pitched excited whine that from what I understand dogs are unaware they are doing??

I trained quite a bit over the spring and summer (4ish days a week) and he has never noticeably whined when training. This hunting season the over excited whining has slowly developed into an almost neurotic behavior that I can no longer tolerate. He has a great temperament around the house, docile as can be, great in the kennel but when you stop the truck to unload to go hunting the whining and outrageous behavior begins. I’ve attempted to bring him hunting 8 or so times since mid November but have hardly even let him out of the kennel so as to not reward the whining. Yesterday he was very collected, got him to the hole and on the dog stand and the whining began. So he was walked back to the truck and put up before we ever fired a shot.

Any tips for attempting to correct this behavior? Would neutering help at all? Should I just make him a house dog and get a new one?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Well John Paul i m sorry your team is going through this ! Almost everyone that opens this will relate as we ve had this problem or know someone that is dealing with noise
My personal opinion is noise ranks right up there as the hardest behavior to correct
likely it all started early as that hard charging, never quit and always wanted more dog raised his prey drive. Then dove hunts with lots of shots and birds and it goes on. Even training in the off season likely helped build this drive.
so to correct your re going to get lots of solutions put your way. Everyone of them will have some validity. But what works for u?
Just yesterday in training I watched a respected trainer deal with noise on a young dog. In this case a long flier that was hard to see with shorter stations much more visible. It took a long time to eventually pick out the station. For this dog it was shot as a single.
I would guess the dog was sent 20 times and called back for a slight noise Finally he was allowed to retriever once quiet. It was the correct correction at that time.
another time it could be back to the hb and another back to the truck. there no one way
I ve been in the blind with a noisy dog - it’s tough.
try this - when your training and he’s next. Get out and work on discipline till he gives in : that’s heel,here, sit and so on : no field work till he’s a teammate. When u go to the blind it’s tougher but try to raise the discipline bar. I d be one to say never use the collar or stick on noise but someone will say it worked for me.
good luck
 

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As Mr Kress said, maybe the worst problem to have and many possible solutions that may or may not work.
Just spoke with friend who is dealing with some minor noise issues with a young dog. They have a blind planted with every training setup. Any noise as the mark(s) are thrown, the dog runs the blind first. If he is quiet he gets the marks first.
 

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This is an excerpt from the past.....change the "pictures".

1. teach him what it means to be "staked out"
2. throw some marks into floating decoys and delay any retrieves
3. boat involved? (it is a change of pace)
4. been in a blind? dog hide?
5. do training setups where time is "stretched" at least 30+ minutes
6. show him that doing nothing for quite some time is not unusual

These are two old training videos......they remain valid. Work outside of the box.


Also....

 
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