RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
875 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to a ball field to do a little work with the dogs today, and noticed that it had been posted with pesticide warning signs. It had been sprayed 3 days earlier. I left.
Does anyone have an idea if there is a risk to the dogs here? (I have to believe there is.) What I'm not sure of, is how long I should avoid it. We're having 24 hrs of solid thunder showers here, so I'm wondering if that would make it safe again.
Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
It does depend on what they have used. Pesticide refers to the whole spectrum to include herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides. You should be fine after the rain. It would most likely be fine if it were dry right now. Most every pesticide on the market is very safe, but if you do not know I would err on the side of caution. If there is a contact number (which is what we have to post in the states) it would be nice to know what product they have used. The person who could answer that may very well have a schedule and list for your information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,061 Posts
the laws for application in Minnesota require the person making the application name the pesticide, when it was applied, and interval for safe re-entry. This is supposted to be posted around the area of application. In the case of herbicides they are usually absorbed by the plants in 4-6 hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Just a side note to the pesticides. If you use anything with iminicloprid(sp) used in grub control products as well as other things, some seeds are now treated with it. It works much like frontline does, it is systemic which stays with you for awhile. It attacks the nervous system of insect pests. The problem is it is not selective so along with the grubs it kills earthworms and more important it kills bees (you know the bees that pollinate the plants that produce the fruits and veggies we eat). Please don't use this stuff if you like bees and enjoy eating produce. It has already been banned in Europe. Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Scott,

Due to the time of year it was most likely that the pesticide applied was a herbicide. Being 3 days post application reduces exposure potential to almost none. Most herbicides have relatively lower toxicities for mamals. That means it requires a large dose to cause acute toxicity. Something you or your dog couldn't get from a recently treated ball field.

Insecticides have the greatest potential for causing acute toxicity reactions in us and our dogs. Most act on the central nervous system. There is enough comonality between insect and mamal central nervous sytems that those products are toxic to us and our dogs too. The danger is in the dose we are exposed to and that is based on body weight. Fortunately, we and our dogs weigh several orders of magnitude greater than the tageted insects. Which means, it is very unlikey to recieve an acutely toxic dose even if entering a treated area immediately after application of the insecticide.

I'm sharing this to help you better understand the potential risks to you and your dog. They are very, very small. That said, I would still avoid those situations whenever possible. Stay away from treated fields for a day or two. Sunlight will quickly break down most pesticides. Many of the most toxic insecticides break down rapidly in the environment. In less than an hour for some.

To help put this all in perspective. The insecticide Sevin has about the same toxicity as aspirin.

I would always err on the side of caution.

Have fun with your dog,

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
875 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for your responses. They are a great help.
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
twall, very educated response. Not to say you should ever discount any potentail hazards, but most folks are uneducated and overly spooky about pesticides. Sound advice.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top