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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anyone that can direct ME to articles on place training
puppies/young dogs I am getting a new puppy and want to incorperate
this in to training. I have done a search but have not come up with
much. I know there is some good trainers using this method because
I have seen the results on this site and must say I was impressed.
Thanks for any help.
 

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I believe Pat Nolan had some really good place training articles and or videos available. Try googling his name or maybe someone else here still has the links?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Chris thanks for posting the link that Danielle put up. When I posted this
thread I was kinda hoping she would have a little input. I pretty much
figured She had enuogh after the clicker training deal for a while.
I also train with a clicker and Use a verbal yes as a marker. Although
I am just starting back into retrievers I am not new to dog training I have
titled several dogs in Schutzhund and have a German Shepherds and
Belgium Malinois on the street as police dogs all trained with Clickers in
obedience. Some of which where started in another language and converted
to the clicker.
That being said what I am really after is the starting of place training
are the people using luring as in teaching the sit and down?
 

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ehf,
I used placeboards in training my pup and got great results. If it's easy to shape a behavior, I prefer shaping to luring. I've read in numerous places that shaping requires more cognitive involvement on the part of the dog, since the dog is actively seeking to make the click or marker word happen. Consequently, the dog really understands the behavior. When you lure, the dog is just instinctively following the food. One common analogy I've heard is that being lured is like following someone in a car to a new location. If you have to drive there by yourself the next day, you may not remember the route because you were focused on following the car, not on learning the route. Same with a dog that's following a piece of food. There are some behaviors that would be challenging or time consuming to shape if you didn't initially use a lure or target of some sort. But getting on a platform is easy to shape, so that's why I went that route.

Here's one approach to shaping. Put out the platform, stand near it with a handful of kibble, and wait to see what choices the pup makes. Pup looks at platform, mark it and then feed. Pup takes a step toward platform, mark it and then feed. As pup continues to move toward platform, continue marking and then feeding. Pup puts a paw on the platform, mark it and then feed. And so on until the pup is on the platform. You can use placement of reinforcement to help build the desired behavior...e.g., if pup looks at platform offer the kibble a few inches in front of the pup's nose so it takes another little step toward the platform as it's collecting its reinforcement. Or you may have a bold pup like mine that immediately jumps on to investigate the platform, so you can mark immediately and then feed. Once the pup is on the platform, you can let it move around a bit, feed some more, then toss a piece of kibble away from the platform to get the pup off and reset it for another rep. After the pup is reliably offering to get on the placeboard, you can begin selectively reinforcing whatever you want the dog's default position on the board to be. If you want a sit, mark and reinforce only when the dog sits. When I did this, I did not ask for a sit. I just waited for the pup to make a choice and reinforced the sit. I wanted the sit to be the default behavior, not something I needed to ask for each time. The end result was a very fast sit on the placeboard.

If I were to use luring in the initial introduction of the placeboard, I'd do something like what Michael Ellis does in introducing a touch pad. See this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doZO6PiRpOo. The section with Ellis explaining his method starts at around 1:50 or so. He explains how he initially lures then reaches a point where he sits back to see what the dog will do. (For a touch pad, he only wants the front feet on, and marks that when he lures. For the placeboard, I'd mark when all four feet are on, if you choose to lure). With your background in Schutzhund, are you familiar with Ellis? He uses markers and a lot of food/play in the initial training of dogs. I have a bunch of his DVDs. He's an awesome trainer and the DVDs are fantastic resources.

Another thing you can do with a very young pup is to feed it a few meals on the placeboard, to help condition a positive association with it.

Good luck with your pup. Placeboard training is great!
 
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