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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question from European, wrong forum but must ask:

Is Plott Hound a breed separate from the Catahoula? Separate from the Coonhound? Walker? If anyone has got the websites of the respective breed Clubs I would be grateful. Also wondering about differences.
 
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I laugh because my husband and I turned on OLN one day and they had a UKC conformation show on with a plott hound on the table. And I laughed because it looks just like my little Alli. We nicknamed her a barrel on toothpicks. And she has big ears. And when I clicked on the link, there she was again!! The dog we saw on the show must have been the slate blue because the dog looked black... And looked just like Alli.
 

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There are six distinct coonhound breeds: The Treeing Walker Coonhound; English Coonhound, Bluetick Coonhound; Redbone Coonhound, Black and Tan Coonhound, and Plott Hound. (Note that the Plott is the only breed oif the six that doesn't have "coonhound" as part of its official name)
Each has its own traits, colors and so on....Plotts are very commonly used as big game dogs as well...it suits their temperament. They have a look about them that is a bit different from the rest of the coonhound breeds...shorter ears, a less "houndy" looking head, usually a bit leggier, and the brindled coat is a dead giveaway.
 

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It is the North Carolina state dog :)

here is some info from a state website.

mary

The Plott Hound breed originated in the mountains of North Carolina around 1750 and is the only breed known to have originated in this State. Named for Jonathan Plott who developed the breed as a wild boar hound, the Plott Hound is a legendary hunting dog known as a courageous fighter and tenacious tracker. He is also a gentle and extremely loyal companion to hunters of North Carolina. The Plott Hound is very quick of foot with superior treeing instincts and has always been a favorite of big-game hunters.

The Plott Hound has a beautiful brindle-colored coat and a spine-tingling, bugle-like call. It is also only one of four breeds known to be of American origin.
 

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It is the North Carolina state dog :)

here is some info from a state website.

mary

The Plott Hound breed originated in the mountains of North Carolina around 1750 and is the only breed known to have originated in this State. Named for Jonathan Plott who developed the breed as a wild boar hound, the Plott Hound is a legendary hunting dog known as a courageous fighter and tenacious tracker. He is also a gentle and extremely loyal companion to hunters of North Carolina. The Plott Hound is very quick of foot with superior treeing instincts and has always been a favorite of big-game hunters.

The Plott Hound has a beautiful brindle-colored coat and a spine-tingling, bugle-like call. It is also only one of four breeds known to be of American origin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Are the plotts as tough/sharp against wild animals and other dogs as the catahoula?

When hunting boar, would You choose a plott or a bluetick? Why?
 

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Not to hijack the thread -- but this talk about coonhounds reminded me of my experience with this sport -- in Ontario we used to have the Hunting Show every September here in Toronto -- there was an area for all Sporting Dogs and Hounds -- the various breeds were demonstrated -- I was down there for several years in a row with the retrievers but got to know someof the other breed representatives -- one was a coonhound devotee from the Durham Region just east of Toronto -- long story short I ended up being invited out on a **** hunt -- I went out to this guy's house about 8 p.m. -- I'd been instructed to bring hip waders with me and to dress warm -- my host handed me a head lamp and said put this on -- then he loaded up his two hounds -- a Bluetick and a Treeing Walker -- we drove to theoutskirts of the Town of Whitby and stopped in a farmer's cornfield -- my host had permission to run his dogs on the farmer's land -- it was also the time of the year that racoons could not be killed but with a special license one could run the dogs on them -- any way he let the dogs out and soon they were on a trail of a racoon -- they were baying in the distance obviously chasing something -- after waiting a while we followed the sound of the dogs trailing -- across the corn field -- over fences, under fences -- through a swamp -- then the dogs doubled back -- back through the swamp (thank God I'd worn waders -- even more thankful for the headlamp) -- over and under fences again -- then the sound seemed to be coming from one spot -- we followed the hounds' baying to the tree where they had treed the **** -- I couldn't see a thing -- myt host pointed up the tree -- in my headlamp's glow I could catch the glint of green eyes staring back at me -- several pairs of eyes -- there was five racoons in that one tree -- we put the dogs on leads and returned to the truck -- that was my one and only **** hunt -- I know that there are several **** hunts ("nite" hunts) conducted for coonhounds or coonhound field trials under the UKC -- a very different type of dog sport
 

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I had coonhounds in high school and between my **** hunting buddy and I we had all but the Plott. We had stretcher boards for drying the furs. The boards were shaped so the skins could be tacked on to dry. The boards narrowed for the head portion.

My father used to tell about Lucy, bluetick, was so good you could show her the strecher board and she would find a **** to fit. Then one day my mother walked past with the ironing board and Lucy never came back. :lol:

My favorite was a treeing waker who used to bay in the kennel and one evening he wouldn't quiet and I went to shut him in the dog house. In the chokecherry tree that shaded the kennel was a raccoon. Ole' Lonesome had treed a **** while locked in the kennel. :D
 

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Richard
I love your stories -- especially about Lucy
 

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I believe I mentioned that it was done under a specal license that allowed the running of dogs on the raccoons -- but not the killing of *****
 

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Plott hounds

Used to hunt bears in the Upper Penisula of Michigan with Plotts. They are one of the toughest treeing hounds for making a mean walking bear take to a tree. But since the majority of our hunting was for racoon, the Treeing Walker and Bluetick hound was our favorite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sharon Potter said:
If I were going after boar, I'd probably go with a Plott hound. They tend to be more aggressive, gutsier, and scrappier that a Bluetick.

Thanks! How would their gutsiness "be expressed" during a typical hunt? What do they do that the bluetick does not typically?

Are plotts as sharp towards other dogs generally?
 

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Plotts are more likely to attack than just tree or bay up. They're pretty darned fearless. Not to say the other breeds won't do the same, but the Plotts were bred for it and are very good at their job.
 

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My experience with treeing hounds goes back 30 years so probably a coonhound forum would be more informative. We bred bluetick hounds and the Grand Bleu De Gasgone imported from France. 30 years ago AKC did not have limited registration and many breeders, culled hard if dogs did not have the traits they desired. One well respected Plott hound breeder for bear dogs (can not remember the name), destroyed dogs that ran from a fighting ground bear. He lined bred his animals and his dogs were culled hard. They were not mean towards other dogs but they did work together much as a pack. A friend had a kennel full of them. They had gashes, wounds, and swollen feet but they did not quit. I had the experience of watching a pack of walkers and blueticks hounds on a bear be picked up one by one as the bear fought hard enough that these expeienced bear hounds were quiting. The only one left at the end of the day was a young 9 month old female Plott out of this breeding on her first hunt. It was an example of genetic line breeding done right.
I want to say I do not recommend line breeding, alot of people doing it have not a clue what genes are behind their dogs and it can destroy and bottle neck lines quickly. Line breeding should be left to breeders that will keep the offspring to adults for evaluation and cull the undesirable traits and genetic faults. Now days someone has 2 dogs with the same outstanding dog or dogs close up in the pedigree, line breed them, and sell them to the public with open registration this is not how linebreeding was meant to be conducted. Linebreeding was a controlled breeding, closely monitored offspring, severe culling, and destroying an entire line if it did not meet the goals of the breeder.
I guess I have rambled on for a while but back to Plott hounds. I think you have to ask yourself more questions of what you want in a scenting hound. Some track slow and methodical, some only run hotter trails with their noses higher in the air and some tree harder than others. It is much like buying a quality lab. Pick the breed you want find a honest breeder with proven permormance dogs which usually means Grand Nite Champion titles, buy the best you can afford, and this will narrow your odds down to having a top hound. Here is a link to doing just that. http://www.ukcdogs.com/HPCoonhounds.htm
 
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