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I feed my adult dog . . .

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What is your feeding schedule for your adult dogs?
 

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I feed twice a day - about a cup in the AM and about 2 cups in the PM. I feed Purina ONE for Lucy and the "pet" dogs and Briezy eats Pro Plan Performance.

Andy
 

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feeding

I feed puppies three times a day until they are about ten weeks old. I feed the ten week old pups twice daily until about 8-9 months old. I then feed all the dogs once daily,usually very late in the evening after they have worked and cooled down. I feed a very high quality 31/24 dog food with omega fatty acids, glucosimine, and chondroitin added for joint health to the pups, adults, and senior dogs alike.

After reading an article in a recent RJ magazine where a report from Purina concerning this topic was discussed, I am of the opinion I have been correct all along. The report sites a study on sled dogs that are fasted for 24 hours before competition in order to maximize stamina and reduce stomach stress. The article is inciteful and useful for those seeking proper feeding applications for working dogs. In my opinion a working dog, fed properly with the correct type of food and in the correct amount, does not benefit and may even suffer from a twice daily feeding routine.

I have discovered that my dogs run with extreme stamina and energy on this program and they are ripped from head to toe with muscle and very little fat; if any. I always have plenty of water around but food is limited to exactly and precisely what each dog needs everyday and it varies with climate changes. I personally monitor each dog's consumption and waste to regulate the amount fed. In the hot summer months I feed less...in the winter I feed more (approximately 1/2 cup more than in the summer per dog).

HTH
 

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I feed twice a day.

What's interesting to note is that racehorses have their feed pulled from them the morning of the race, but they have unlimited water until about an hour before. Apparently this decreases the weight the horses have to drag around (themselves) and decreases the amount of blood flow needed to the digestive organs to digest, and makes more available to the heart, lungs and brains.
I'm not a vet of course, but have been around a racetrack since i was in diapers.
Reason why water is pulled is because a lot of horses suffer from pulmonary hemhorraging when they run and some are put on the diuretic Salix (Lasix to everyone else) to reduce the chances of that happening.

Is it common practice to pull a dog's food the morning of a trial, or to feed in a reduced amount?

Marcy
 

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I feed them both twice a day. 1 cup a.m & 1 cup p.m of Eagle Reduced fat. Onehas (the one who doesn't hunt or run tests) a thyroid condition & the weight won't come off despite a lot of walking & swimming (can't run her-bad elbows).
My "working girl" is heavier than I'd like even w/ training, walking, swimming. Kind of frustrating, but I guess she's just a big girl! Genetics I suppose.
 

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I feed my guys twice a day, they all get a different amounts depending on their work load and body condition. Pro-Plan lamb and rice is my choice of foods, helps keep their coats in beautiful condition and seems to provide enough energy for their work energy.
I found it interesting though about not feeding before a test or training, I would be curious to see if it does improve their energy level. Think about if they were still wild, they would be hungry before they spent a lot of energy chasing down their dinner.
Margo
 

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I free feed my dog. I know it isn?t the right or best method but there is reasoning behind the decision. When he was around 10 months (he is 2 year 3 months now) he just lost interest in eating. That sounds strange but that is pretty much how I described it to the Vet. She asked all the expected questions about stool, energy etc.. At the end she said he looks great and not to worry. I still worried. I still fed him twice a day but If he didn?t eat in the morning I would pick it up and just add in the afternoon. Some days he wouldn?t even eat. I moved up my schedule to transition him into adult food and tried a few different foods, no change. At that point I decided I am going to free feed. I selected Eukanuba performance and I just leave it available at all times.

I also do not leave his food available prior to testing or training.

The most interesting thing is that he sometimes will eat at night. I will hear him rustling about at night and he will be eating. A nocturnal Lab. Hmmmmm.

He is lean and athletic and I watch his weight as I would an athlete. If his behavior changed and he started to eat and gain weight I would limit his intake. He appears to be limiting it just fine, I have no problem with that.

Joe Miano
 

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Feeding twice daily is supposed to decrease the risk of bloat and volvulus. However, with Purina's data from the Ididarod this may be at the expense of performance. It will be interesting to see if the results are the same for a sprint type of performance ( HT /FT ) as they are for a marathon type of performance. I also feed twice daily. When we are at a hunt test or going hunting my dog usually is too jacked up and doesn't eat anyway.
 
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Re: feeding

okefenokee dawgs said:
(nsip)After reading an article in a recent RJ magazine where a report from Purina concerning this topic was discussed, I am of the opinion I have been correct all along. The report sites a study on sled dogs that are fasted for 24 hours before competition in order to maximize stamina and reduce stomach stress. The article is inciteful and useful for those seeking proper feeding applications for working dogs. In my opinion a working dog, fed properly with the correct type of food and in the correct amount, does not benefit and may even suffer from a twice daily feeding routine.(snip)
Hi Keith,

I think the article you're referring to was the Purina Summit. Dr. Gillette from Auburn was part of that if I recall. We went to the Auburn sports medicine symposium this past winter, where they talked about the feeding of sled dogs versus field dogs. Sled dogs are endurance athletes where the work we do with our retrievers makes them sprint athletes. It's a different chemistry between the two dogs. And he had two different protocols for feeding and nutrition. With sprint athletes, you want to supplement with a glucose mix about 30 mins (I'm trying to recall from memory, so don't quote me on this) prior to activity and then 30 mins after. Something about training the muscles in efficient use of glucose reserves, but again, I don't recall the details.

There was also discussion of training the body to burn fat, which burns at a lower temperature and, as a result, helps prevent overheating. I was getting confused through the whole thing, but I have it in my notes. Sorry this is so vague.

Dr. Buck (and Ed and Noah) can probably explain the body chemistry a heck of a lot better than I can...

With that said, we feed once a day in the evenings. Although I have heard that breaking it into two feedings can help prevent bloat, I've never been comfortable with the timing of doing a morning feeding and then going out to train. I would have to get up at 4 or 4:30 and I'm just not that dedicated!!! :)

-Kristie
 

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feeding

Kristie,

you are correct about the information you presented. The idea that our dogs are sprint athletes, however, is a misnomer in my opinion. In my training regimen I routinely run my dogs for a mile or so before work begins. I then run a series of land and water setups that are pretty tough physically. I then finish the session with a few miles of running behind the 4 wheeler and have them retire to their kennels to cool down before feeding.

I don't know about you guys but that scenario does not sound like a sprint training session. I realize that in testing situations the dogs are run briefly and swim only short distances...that is testing not daily training. The idea is to have a dog that can perform the test at maximum effeciency without physical risk. The study we are talking about supports the idea that dogs perform better on fewer feedings in between work sessions.

In terms of bloat I can only back off and listen to others who have had that problem. I have never experienced it with one of my dogs.
 

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okefenokee dawgs wrote:
I routinely run my dogs for a mile or so before work begins. I then run a series of land and water setups that are pretty tough physically. I then finish the session with a few miles of running behind the 4 wheeler and have them retire to their kennels to cool down before feeding.

I don't know about you guys but that scenario does not sound like a sprint training session.
Hi Keith,

In another life I was a dog driver. What they call sled dog mushers up here. What you described would be a sprint dog type schedule. In limited class, 5 dog would be a 6 mile event and 7 dog would be an eight mile event. In unlimited class a 10-12 mile would be a short sprint with 16-25 being more normal.

When I think of a sprint dog the first thing that pops into my head is an eight mile, balls to the wall, all out sprint. Lot's of fun tryin' to stay on the sled on icy turns :D I'd do it in twenty some minutes 24 something was my fastest I think. I believe nowadays they have gone under 20 minutes.

I can't think of what we do as even close to as physical or as demanding as what a good sled dog will do on an average racing team.

You notice I said nothing about the middle distance or long distance guys.
 

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feeding

Doc E,

Looks like by the results of the poll we have a group comprised of mostly overweigh, not at their peak performance, but not bloated dogs??? 8)
He He He
 

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Sprint

Howard,

I am not privvy to sled dogging (don't get much snow down here in dixie) so you must be correct.

I was simply drawing a comparison between an average dog trial or test and daily training...not to sledding. In our world of retrievers a sprint, in my opinion, would be what the dogs do at a test or trial. That may not be the true definitiion of a sprint, but that is what a I am referring to.

In my scenario, the dog that runs at a test or trial needs to be marathon trained prior to getting there so that they are in the best shape possible. To do that, again in my opinion, requires that the dog be on a once daily feeding program supplemented with water and other necessary nutrients as needed for heat stress and such.
 

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Keith,
I'm still not sure the sled dog results can be applicable to what we do with our retievers. In the dog world it's still probably closer to sprint stuff. The closest thing we do would be a goose or duck hunt with multiple hunters and one dog or a pheasant hunt. Hopefully they will do some studies on retrievers. The only other studies that I'm aware of is on pointers and the importance of feeding a 30/20 food on their performance over the peiod of a hunting season.

Buck
 
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Re: feeding

okefenokee dawgs said:
(snip)I don't know about you guys but that scenario does not sound like a sprint training session.(snip)
Hi Keith,

Endurance athletes, again from what I recall, are dogs that go literally all day. Way different than anything we'd ever do with our retrievers, including roading them. Pointing breeds and sled dogs are the two most commonly referred to in this regards.

-Kristie
 

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endurance

Kristie,

I seem to be missing something. If endurance dogs that go all day, whatever breed that may be, can and do perform better on one feeding per day, why would we feed more food to a dog that is parhaps more sedentary in terms of activity level?

I think Ed responded well in the other feeding thread about this issue in that he sees a lot of their training group dogs overweight and suffering from it in terms of performance. I could see your point, if I knew what it was (He He), if the dogs in reference (performance dogs) performed poorly on a once daily routine.

Anyway, by the looks of the poll I am outnumbered, so I will just take my ripped and shredded dogs and go play for a few hours.... 8) :lol:
 

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Keith,
It will be interesting to see the results if they ever do a similar study in labs. My guess is that feeding schedule will be less important, just because of the different metabolic demands.The most important thing is not the number of feedings but the total amount of food per day. As you have said a lean dog in great shape is definitely going to perform better.
 
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Re: endurance

okefenokee dawgs said:
Kristie,

I seem to be missing something. If endurance dogs that go all day, whatever breed that may be, can and do perform better on one feeding per day, why would we feed more food to a dog that is parhaps more sedentary in terms of activity level?
(snip)
I wasn't saying to feed more. I was just saying that the protocol for feeding and supplementation is different for performance versus endurance athletes. Dr. Gillette did an hour-long presentation on it and I wrote down almost everything he said -- most of which was over my head. The bottom line was that the metabolic activity in their muscles was different as far as the "goodies" they used to optimize performance. The muscular function in sprint versus endurance athletes was amazingly different. For quick bursts of activity, you want one type of supplementation. And for long-term activity, you want another type of supplementation. The muscles work in two different ways for each type of activity -- or rather... The muscles start out working in one particular way and then switch over as activity goes beyond a certain period of time. So our dogs (sprinters) wouldn't benefit from a program that's structured for endurance athletes because they never work long enough to reap those benefits.

Here's some of Dr. Gillette's stuff:
http://www.sportsvet.com/page4.htm
http://www.sportsvet.com/Art3.html <This is the one with the technical stuff

-Kristie
 

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Kristie

Kristie,

Thanks,

I assumed you didn't mean feed more since you stated you only feed once daily. However, I think your clarification will help others that may be reading (with fat dogs...he he he).

Pelagius: “Once lust is unbridled it knows no limits. In the order of nature those who forgot God did not understand themselves either.”
 
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