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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are some here that know a bit about duck calls. My husband wants to learn more about it for actual hunting purposes. Where should he start? CD's, books, where?
 

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CD's are good, I have several. (kinda like dog books, can't have enough).

I like the RNT series, I bought the full set, 3 different discs.

After listening and practicing for awhile, he needs to find someone who knows how to blow a call, and go listen and blow the call for that person.

Listening to the cd's only get you so far, especially if your not doing something right (most of the time it is correct air) If your doing that wrong, nothing else is right either.

Find some waterfowl events with pro staffers on site, he could blow a call with them and probably get some instant lessons.

Is he a member of any hunting forums? Maybe someone lives close by that he could get some personal lessons from, that helped me a lot.

OH, calls are like dogs and training gear, ONE IS NOT ENOUGH!!!!! :D
 

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I asked this same question a while back, and the MASTER himself (Chris Atkinson) replied and suggested the Carlson System of Call Operation. It is extremely detailed in all aspects of duck call operation and helped me tremendously. I highly recommend purchasing this material.

Larry
 

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IMO you can't learn calling from just the CD's, although they are a great way to practice, especially on the drive to work. I'd recommend both CD's and Videos, combined with some calling time with a guy that not only knows how to blow a call, but also knows WHEN to call ducks.

The techniques will come from technical explanations, but the "art" of duck calling comes into play when you can read the ducks and call accordingly.

Todd
 

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laranie labs said:
I asked this same question a while back, and the MASTER himself (Chris Atkinson) replied and suggested the Carlson System of Call Operation. It is extremely detailed in all aspects of duck call operation and helped me tremendously. I highly recommend purchasing this material.
Larry
My opinion this is the best learning system on the market. Not easy to master and does take some time and work. As far as calls just about all the high end call are good and can be tuned to you needs. RNT Foiles Echo Winglock are good calls. My personal favorite is RNT!
 

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Like asking which retriever organization is "the best", picking the best duck call, or the best instructional system is largely a matter of personal preference. It's also a matter of deciding what one's end goal is. Is it to compete on stage calling human judges, or is it to be more effective in the duckblind.... They're not mutually exclusive, one can definitely have both, but the approaches may vary - depending upon the goal. (If your goal includes Mainstreet calling, I'd suggest not learning on a double-reed)

Wildfowl Adventures just posted about his buddy Keith's being the best. I tend to agree that Keith (Refugeman) Allen's is possibly "the best" out there. What WA did not mention is that he has not one, but TWO World Champion trophies that he pulls out in the duckblind, to show to passing mallards when they won't respond well to calling... 8) (OK, I'm joking that he takes his trophies out in the field, but he really is a two-time world champ) Christian also didn't mention that he himself is part of the RNT Trilogy calling instructional. The RNT stuff is quite good.

I've mentioned the Carlson system on here before. Of all the instructional systems, Carlson is either loved or "hated" by callers. Carlson's is much more "technical" than the others, focusing a bit more on "physics" and non-ducky sounding excercises, to get the operator to the endpoint. (the above mentioned were not yet available when I started) I don't know if I'd still be messing with the Carlson system or not if I were starting over today. I think the Carlson system is still an excellent choice if one's goals may include trying to get qualified for the world's in Stuttgart AND one has no access to good callers live, and must go it alone with a CD/DVD player, a call, and his time.

I think a couple things need to be looked at for a new caller, or someone looking to do more with a call. What are you looking to do? Are you looking to compete and call judges, or to be more effective in the field to call ducks? How much practice do you want to put into it? Face it, some folks really want a quickie, want to spend very little time practicing.

Callingducks.com is pretty new. I'd suggest that someone looking to get more into duck calling poke around there a little. There's a good amount of stuff there including calling forums, soundfiles, etc.

Chris
 

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Chris, I agree.

1. Do not learn on a double reed. Their operation is totally different than a single reed. If you can operate a single reed and still prefer the sound of a double, then you can blow the double. However, just because you can operate a double, doesn't mean that you can operate a single.

2. The Carlson system is VERY technical, by far the most scientific instructional format to date. They go in to size of mouth cavity and tongue position, etc. BUT, in my opinion, I just don't like the end result. What I mean is that I am just not a fan of the sound that results from the instruction. This may not make sense but it is a fact, the Carlson system produces a distinct and easily recognizable sound that I am just not a fan of. I know for a fact that our beloved RTF leader learned this system and has been battling for years to get away from this sound and has been one of the more successful I know at achieving this. Just ask him, it has been tough!

RNT's stuff is good definitely, but Keith's teaching method is amazing. He has broken it down in ways that is very easy to understand. If you master the techniques he describes in this CD, you are blowing a duck call. An example is this...Keith started working with 4 young guys last year about March. By November, 2 of them had qualified for the World and 1 made the final round.

Finally, being able to operate a call is only half of the battle when learning to call ducks, albeit the toughest part for most. The second part is where a ton of good call operators get lost. You have to learn to communicate with the ducks not just call at them. Where most people struggle is they try to sound like Chris, Christian, Keith, or their next door neighbor that is the best "duck caller" they have ever heard. You have to listen to ducks....period. There are some recordings out there of live ducks (Zink's Mallards Gone Wild is one) that can be very beneficial. The best however, is the real thing. Go to a park, a refuge, or sit next to your flyer pen. They will show you what to say and when to say it.

Becoming a good call operator is tough and being a good duck caller is even harder. Some people think that good calling is necessary to harvest more ducks, some think it is unimportant but that group mainly is made up of people that either can't do it or don't want to put the time in to learn. Much like retrievers...some think that your hunting partner must be able to run a 300 yard blind across 3 rice levees to be effective and some that even force fetching is unecessary.

Good luck!
 

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echo

Get on the the echo duck calls website and order Rick Dunn's Duck Calling CD. You can't go wrong with Team Echo. The CD covers everything from the basic quacks, 2 man meet calling, and the open contest calling routines.
 

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Good points Christian,

It's funny...out of all those Carlson heritage callers, Barnie seemed to be able to pull it off with a "univerally appealing routine"....I'd imagine his C of C is coming....

Chris, who's on Ted Kourousis' coat-tails and still shaking the Carlson hen....

(Which drake mallards may like more than judges... :wink: )

Let's face it...I was lucky to get on that bus and barely called my way out of the paper bag, the few times I did it!

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the ideas. My husband's interest is in getting ducks to the blind, I dont think he's much interested in competition. Would that narrow down the choices somewhat? Its his job to bring 'em and shoot 'em, (he does pretty well at hitting them :D And I'm doing my level best to make sure our dog will bring them back!
 

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I've tried the calling thing, but for my money, NOTHING beats a few sacks of ground corn to put little feathered butts in the decoys.

Just a little something I picked up from /paul regards


Bubba
 

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Bubba said:
I've tried the calling thing, but for my money, NOTHING beats a few sacks of ground corn to put little feathered butts in the decoys.

Just a little something I picked up from /paul regards


Bubba
Sometimes I wonder if you'll ever learn. Its sweet corn, left overnight in a Williams bakery white bread bag and you have to spread it evenly throughout the decoys.

/Paul
 

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It really doesn't matter whether his aspirations are in the field or on the stage, you have to be able to competently operate a call. In other words that doesn't narrow down the choices...all of the above listed instructional programs will help him.
 

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Wildfowl Adventures said:
It really doesn't matter whether his aspirations are in the field or on the stage, you have to be able to competently operate a call. In other words that doesn't narrow down the choices...all of the above listed instructional programs will help him.
I agree with this, with one exception.

I think if someone doesn't aspire to be on stage, AND they realistically don't want to invest much time in practicing, and never will, they may want to consider a double-reed.

Lots of guys seem to get a somewhat ducky quack quickly with the double and that's as far as they want to go.
 

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Bubba wrote:
I've tried the calling thing, but for my money, NOTHING beats a few sacks of ground corn to put little feathered butts in the decoys.

Just a little something I picked up from /paul regards


Bubba


Sometimes I wonder if you'll ever learn. Its sweet corn, left overnight in a Williams bakery white bread bag and you have to spread it evenly throughout the decoys.

/Paul
No use in casting a bare hook, huh boys?
 

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2-Dogs said:
Bubba wrote:
I've tried the calling thing, but for my money, NOTHING beats a few sacks of ground corn to put little feathered butts in the decoys.

Just a little something I picked up from /paul regards


Bubba


Sometimes I wonder if you'll ever learn. Its sweet corn, left overnight in a Williams bakery white bread bag and you have to spread it evenly throughout the decoys.

/Paul
No use in casting a bare hook, huh boys?
I typically used canned corn when I'm fishin...

/Paul
 

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Wildfowl Adventures said:
Okay...okay...


I'll give it to you...if you don't want to be on stage and you want sound sound like one and only one duck, a DR will do the trick.
Like I said, it was an exception.

The one nice thing about that sort of caller is at least they are realistic upfront. If they don't want to put any time into learning....and they want to do the absolute bare minimum for a quick quack, they admit it and get on with it.

- Chris, who can sound like more than one thing, but is not sure if any of them are ducks.
 
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